Spellcheck.net

Definitions of cog

  1. roll steel ingots Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. tooth on the rim of gear wheel Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. join pieces of wood with cogs Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. To seduce, or draw away, by adulation, artifice, or falsehood; to wheedle; to cozen; to cheat. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To obtrude or thrust in, by falsehood or deception; as, to cog in a word; to palm off. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To deceive; to cheat; to play false; to lie; to wheedle; to cajole. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. A trick or deception; a falsehood. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. A tooth, cam, or catch for imparting or receiving motion, as on a gear wheel, or a lifter or wiper on a shaft; originally, a separate piece of wood set in a mortise in the face of a wheel. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. A kind of tenon on the end of a joist, received into a notch in a bearing timber, and resting flush with its upper surface. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A tenon in a scarf joint; a coak. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. One of the rough pillars of stone or coal left to support the roof of a mine. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To furnish with a cog or cogs. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. A small fishing boat. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  14. The tooth of a gear-wheel; a toothed cam; a projection on a beam to be received in a notch on another to join the two together. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. To furnish with gear-teeth. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. Cogged. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. Cogging. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. One of a series of teeth or projections on a wheel or other part of machinery; used figuratively in the sense of an interruption to the regular course of any action. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  19. To cheat or deceive: to cog dice is to load them so that they may fall in a given way. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. A catch or tooth on a wheel. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. To fix teeth in the rim of a wheel:-pr.p. cogging; pa.p. cogged. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. The tooth of a wheel. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  23. A tooth projecting from the surface of a wheel. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. The tooth of a wheel, by which it drives another wheel or body; a little boat. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  25. To wheedle; to seduce or draw from, by adulation or artifice; to cheat; to obtrude or thrust in by falsehood or deception. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  26. To furnish with cogs, as a wheel. In Scotland, a round wooden bowl. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  27. To wheedle. To cog a die, to load it. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  28. Prefix-see co. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  29. The tooth on the rim of a wheel; a piece of deceit; a trick. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  30. To furnish with cogs; to obtain by flattering or wheedling; to wheedle; to cheat. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  31. A wooden vessel of a circular form for containing milk, broth, &c.; a little boat. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  32. kog, v.t. to cheat or deceive: to wheedle: to cog dice is to manipulate them so that they may fall in a given way.--n. the act of cheating: deception.--p.adj. COG'GING, cheating. [No doubt from the succeeding word.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  33. kog, n. a catch or tooth on a wheel.--v.t. to fix teeth in the rim of a wheel: to stop a wheel by putting a block before it:--pr.p. cog'ging; pa.p. cogged.--n. COG'-WHEEL, a toothed wheel, whose teeth fit into and move another. [M. E. cogge; ety. dub.; cf. Sw. kugge.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  34. kog, n. formerly a large ship of burden or for war: a small boat: a cock-boat. [M. E. cogge, perh. from O. Fr. cogue, a ship. Cf. Dan. kogge, kog; Ice. kuggi.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  35. One of series of projections on edge of wheel or side of bar transferring motion by engaging with another series; hunting c., extra c. on one wheel &c. securing constant variation in the cc. engaged; c.-wheel, with cc. Hence cogged a. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  36. C. dice, fraudulently control the way they fall (cogged dice for loaded dice is a mistake of modern archaists). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  37. See Cogge. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  38. n. [Welsh] A tooth or projection on a wheel by which it receives or imparts motion. Cabinet Dictionary
  39. n. [Gaelic] A wooden bowl or dish a drinking cup. [Welsh] A boat; a fishing-boat. Cabinet Dictionary
  40. The tooth of a wheel, by which it acts upon another - wheel. Complete Dictionary

What are the misspellings for cog?

X