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Definitions of command

  1. To have or exercise supreme authority or influence. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To order or charge with authority; control; exercise supreme authority over; lead; to overlook, as from a height; to exact; to be able to obtain. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  3. To order: to bid: to exercise supreme authority over: to have within sight, influence, or control. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4. To order; govern; have within sight or influence. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  5. To order with authority; require; enjoin. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  6. To have under control; be master of; overlook, as from a height; cover; guard; be able to obtain. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  7. To claim irresistibly. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  8. To act as a leader; to rule. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  9. To have chief authority: message: the ability to overlook or influence: the thing commanded. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  10. To have chief authority. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  11. look down on; "The villa dominates the town" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. be in command of; "The general commanded a huge army" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. To be in authority; rule. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. To order; to control; to have in power; to dominate or overlook; to enforce. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  15. To bid, order, or charge with authority; to govern or direct; to have power over; to have within the observation of the eye. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  16. availability for use; "the materials at the command of the potters grew" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. the power or authority to command; "an admiral in command" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. (computer science) a line of code written as part of a computer program Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. a military unit or region under the control of a single officer Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. demand as one's due; "This speaker commands a high fee"; "The author commands a fair hearing from his readers" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  21. To order with authority; to lay injunction upon; to direct; to bid; to charge. Newage Dictionary DB
  22. To exercise direct authority over; to have control of; to have at one's disposal; to lead. Newage Dictionary DB
  23. To have within a sphere of control, influence, access, or vision; to dominate by position; to guard; to overlook. Newage Dictionary DB
  24. To have power or influence of the nature of authority over; to obtain as if by ordering; to receive as a due; to challenge; to claim; as, justice commands the respect and affections of the people; the best goods command the best price. Newage Dictionary DB
  25. To direct to come; to bestow. Newage Dictionary DB
  26. To have or to exercise direct authority; to govern; to sway; to influence; to give an order or orders. Newage Dictionary DB
  27. To have a view, as from a superior position. Newage Dictionary DB
  28. An authoritative order requiring obedience; a mandate; an injunction. Newage Dictionary DB
  29. The possession or exercise of authority. Newage Dictionary DB
  30. Authority; power or right of control; leadership; as, the forces under his command. Newage Dictionary DB
  31. Power to dominate, command, or overlook by means of position; scope of vision; survey. Newage Dictionary DB
  32. Control; power over something; sway; influence; as, to have command over one's temper or voice; the fort has command of the bridge. Newage Dictionary DB
  33. A body of troops, or any naval or military force or post, or the whole territory under the authority or control of a particular officer. Newage Dictionary DB
  34. Authority; an order or mandate; a dominating situation; power to control; a naval or military force under a certain officer. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  35. An order; behest; the thing commanded. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  36. The right to command; act of commanding; control; mastery; authority. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. An order; commandment. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. The force or district commanded. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. The right, power, or act of commanding; supreme power or authority; mandate or order given; the power of overlooking; a body of troops, or any naval or military force or station, under the command of a particular officer. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. Right, power, or authority over; an order or message with authority; a naval or military force under the authority of a particular officer. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for command?

Usage examples for command

  1. It looked so easy to command a company when some one else was doing it; it was hard when he tried it himself. – The Red Acorn by John McElroy
  2. I feared that the stars would eat me if I did not obey their command and now they have come. – Philippine Folk Tales by Mabel Cook Cole
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