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Definitions of common

  1. lacking refinement or cultivation or taste; "he had coarse manners but a first-rate mind"; "behavior that branded him as common"; "an untutored and uncouth human being"; "an uncouth soldier--a real tough guy"; "appealing to the vulgar taste for violence"; "the vulgar display of the newly rich" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  2. a piece of open land for recreational use in an urban area; "they went for a walk in the park" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. of no special distinction or quality; widely known or commonly encountered; average or ordinary or usual; "the common man"; "a common sailor"; "the common cold"; "a common nuisance"; "followed common procedure"; "it is common knowledge that she lives alone"; "the common housefly"; "a common brand of soap" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  4. belonging to or participated in by a community as a whole; public; "for the common good"; "common lands are set aside for use by all members of a community" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. commonly encountered; "a common (or familiar) complaint"; "the usual greeting" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. being or characteristic of or appropriate to everyday language; "common parlance"; "a vernacular term"; "vernacular speakers"; "the vulgar tongue of the masses"; "the technical and vulgar names for an animal species" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. of or associated with the great masses of people; "the common people in those days suffered greatly"; "behavior that branded him as common"; "his square plebeian nose"; "a vulgar and objectionable person"; "the unwashed masses" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. to be expected; standard; "common decency" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. common to or shared by two or more parties; "a common friend"; "the mutual interests of management and labor" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. Belonging or relating equally, or similarly, to more than one; as, you and I have a common interest in the property. Newage Dictionary DB
  11. Belonging to or shared by, affecting or serving, all the members of a class, considered together; general; public; as, properties common to all plants; the common schools; the Book of Common Prayer. Newage Dictionary DB
  12. Often met with; usual; frequent; customary. Newage Dictionary DB
  13. Not distinguished or exceptional; inconspicuous; ordinary; plebeian; -- often in a depreciatory sense. Newage Dictionary DB
  14. Profane; polluted. Newage Dictionary DB
  15. Given to habits of lewdness; prostitute. Newage Dictionary DB
  16. The people; the community. Newage Dictionary DB
  17. An inclosed or uninclosed tract of ground for pleasure, for pasturage, etc., the use of which belongs to the public; or to a number of persons. Newage Dictionary DB
  18. The right of taking a profit in the land of another, in common either with the owner or with other persons; -- so called from the community of interest which arises between the claimant of the right and the owner of the soil, or between the claimants and other commoners entitled to the same right. Newage Dictionary DB
  19. To converse together; to discourse; to confer. Newage Dictionary DB
  20. To participate. Newage Dictionary DB
  21. To have a joint right with others in common ground. Newage Dictionary DB
  22. To board together; to eat at a table in common. Newage Dictionary DB
  23. Belonging equally to more than one; as common to the human race; public; usual; frequent; inferior; of low birth or origin; in grammar, applied to both masculine and feminine gender, or to any individual of a class; as, a common noun. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  24. A tract of open public land. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  25. Commonness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. Belonging equally to more than one: public: general: usual: frequent: easy to be had: of little value: vulgar. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  27. A tract of open land, used in common by the inhabitants of a town, parish, etc. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  28. An open public ground. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  29. Belonging to several; public; general; usual; of small value; vulgar. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  30. Frequent or usual; customary; regular. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. Pertaining to two or more persons or things; joint; general. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  32. Common place; coarse; vulgar; low. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. Land owned by a town; land open to the lower classes. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. Belonging equally to more than one, or to many indefinitely; belonging to all; public; general; frequent; usual; of little value; of low or no rank; vulgar; of verbs, both active and passive; of nouns, both masculine and feminine, also applicable to a whole class. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  35. A tract of open ground, the common property of all the members of a community; conjoint property of all the members of a community; conjoint possession. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  36. To have a joint right in some common ground; to board together. A common divisor or measure, a quantity which divides two or more quantities without leaving a remainder. Common prayer, the liturgical formulary of the Church of England. Common time, those varieties of time in which each measure is divided into two or four equal parts. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  37. Belonging equally to more than one; serving for the use of all; usual or ordinary; without rank; not distinguished by superior excellence; in gram., applied to nouns that are both masc. and fem. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  38. A tract of ground belonging to no one in particular or open to the use of all. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  39. Not distinguished or exceptional; inconspicuous; ordinary; plebeian; often in a depreciatory sense. dictgcide_fs
  40. The right of taking a profit in the land of another, in common either with the owner or with other persons; so called from the community of interest which arises between the claimant of the right and the owner of the soil, or between the claimants and other commoners entitled to the same right. dictgcide_fs
  41. kom'un, adj. belonging equally to more than one: public: general: usual: frequent: ordinary: easy to be had: of little value: vulgar: of low degree.--n. (Shak.) the commonalty: a tract of open land, used in common by the inhabitants of a town, parish, &c.--v.i. (Shak.) to share.--adj. COMMON'ABLE, held in common.--ns. COMM'ONAGE, right of pasturing on a common: the right of using anything in common: a common; COMM'ONALTY, the general body of the people without any distinction of rank or authority; COMM'ONER, one of the common people, as opposed to the nobles: a member of the House of Commons: at Oxford, a student who pays for his commons.--adv. COMM'ONLY.--ns. COMM'ONNESS; COMM'ONPLACE, a common topic or subject: a platitude: a memorandum: a note.--adj. common: hackneyed.--v.i. to make notes: to put in a commonplace-book.--n. COMM'ONPLACE-BOOK, a note or memorandum book.--n.pl. COMM'ONS, the common people: their representatives--i.e. the lower House of Parliament or HOUSE OF COMMONS: common land: food at a common table: at Oxford, rations served at a fixed rate from the college buttery: food in general, rations.--n. COMM'ON-SENSE, average understanding: good sense or practical sagacity: the opinion of a community: the universally admitted impressions of mankind.--COMMON BENCH, COMMON PLEAS, one of the divisions of the High Court of Justice; COMMON FORMS, the ordinary clauses which are of frequent occurrence in identical terms in writs and deeds; COMMON LAW, in England, the ancient customary law of the land; COMMON PRAYER (BOOK OF), the liturgy of the Church of England; COMMON-RIDING, the Scotch equivalent of BEATING THE BOUNDS (see BEAT); COMMON ROOM, in schools, colleges, &c., a room to which the members have common access.--IN COMMON, together: equally with others.--MAKE COMMON CAUSE WITH, to cast in one's lot with: to have the same interests and aims with.--PHILOSOPHY OF COMMON-SENSE, that school of philosophy which takes the universally admitted impressions of mankind as corresponding to the facts of things without any further scrutiny.--SHORT COMMONS, scant fare, insufficient supply of rations.--THE COMMON, that which is common or usual; THE COMMON GOOD, the interest of the community at large: the corporate property of a burgh in Scotland; THE COMMON PEOPLE, the people in general. [Fr. commun--L. communis, prob. from com, together, and munis, serving, obliging.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  42. Belonging equally to, coming from, or done by, more than one, as our c. humanity, c. cause, c. consent; belonging to, open to, affecting, the public, as c. crier, goal, alehouse, nuisance, scold; of ordinary occurrence, as a c. experience; ordinary, of ordinary qualities, as c. honesty, no c. mind; without rank or position, as c. soldier, the c. people; of the most familiar type, as C. Nightshade, Snake; of inferior quality; vulgar; (Math.) belonging to two or more quantities, as c. factor, multiple; (Gram.) c. noun, name applicable to any one of a class, c. gender, masculine or feminine; (Pros.) of variable quantity; (Mus.) c. time, measure, (two or four beats in bar), c. CHORD; c. law, unwritten law of England, administered by the King\'s courts, purporting to be derived from ancient usage; Court of C. Pleas (for trial of civil causes, a bolished 1875); C. Prayer, liturgy set forth in Book of C. P. of Edward VI; c. room (at Oxford), room to which fellows retire after dinner; c. sense, normal understanding, good practical sense in everyday affairs, general feeling (of mankind or community), philosophy of c. sense (accepting primary beliefs of mankind as ultimate criterion of truth); c. weal, commonweal, archaic, public welfare, (also) =COMMONWEALTH. Hence commonness n. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  43. Land belonging to a community, esp. unenclosed waste land; (right of) c., a man\'s right over another\'s land, as c. of pasturage; out of the c., unusual; in c., in joint use, shared. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  44. n. An uninclosed tract of ground belonging to the public, or to a number of persons. Cabinet Dictionary
  45. Belonging equally to more than one ; having no posses for or owner; vulgar, mean, easy to be had, not scarce ; publick, general ; mean, without birth or descent ; frequent, useful, ordinary ; prostitute. Complete Dictionary
  46. An open ground equally used by many persons. Complete Dictionary

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