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Definitions of complete

  1. highly skilled; "an accomplished pianist"; "a complete musician" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. having come or been brought to a conclusion; "the harvesting was complete"; "the affair is over, ended, finished"; "the abruptly terminated interview" Webster Dictionary DB
  3. without qualification; used informally as (often pejorative) intensifiers; "an arrant fool"; "a complete coward"; "a consummate fool"; "a double-dyed villain"; "gross negligence"; "a perfect idiot"; "pure folly"; "what a sodding mess"; "stark staring mad"; "a thoroughgoing villain"; "utter nonsense" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  4. complete or carry out; "discharge one's duties" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. having every necessary or normal part or component or step; "a complete meal"; "a complete wardrobe"; "a complete set pf the Britannica"; "a complete set of china"; "a complete defeat"; "a complete accounting" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. (botany) having all four whorls or principal parts--sepals and petals and stamens and carpels (or pistils); "complete flowers" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. perfect and complete in every respect; having all necessary qualities; "a complete gentleman"; "consummate happiness"; "a consummate performance" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. come or bring to a finish or an end; "He finished the dishes"; "She completed the requirements for her Master's Degree"; "The fastest runner finished the race in just over 2 hours; others finished in over 4 hours" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. bring to a whole, with all the necessary parts or elements; "A child would complete the family" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. write all the required information onto a form; "fill out this questionnaire, please!"; "make out a form" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. completely The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. complete a pass Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. having all four whorls or principal parts--sepals and petals and stamens and carpels (or pistils); "complete flowers" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. Filled up; with no part or element lacking; free from deficiency; entire; perfect; consummate. Newage Dictionary DB
  15. Finished; ended; concluded; completed; as, the edifice is complete. Newage Dictionary DB
  16. Having all the parts or organs which belong to it or to the typical form; having calyx, corolla, stamens, and pistil. Newage Dictionary DB
  17. To bring to a state in which there is no deficiency; to perfect; to consummate; to accomplish; to fulfill; to finish; as, to complete a task, or a poem; to complete a course of education. Newage Dictionary DB
  18. Lacking nothing; entire; perfect; full; finished. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  19. To make whole or perfect; fulfil; finish. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. Completeness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  21. To fill up, finish, or perfect: to accomplish. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. Filled us: free from deficiency: perfect: finished. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  23. Free from deficiency; perfect; entire; finished. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  24. To fill up; perfect; finish. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  25. To make complete; accomplish; finish; fulfil. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. Perfect; entire; absolute; finished. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  27. To finish; to perfect; to accomplish. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  28. Without a flaw; perfect; not defective; finished; concluded. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  29. See also complete graph, complete inference system,complete lattice, complete metric space, complete partialordering, complete theory.[1. or 2. or both?] foldoc_fs
  30. kom-pl[=e]t', adj. free from deficiency: perfect: finished: entire.--v.t. to finish: to make perfect or entire: to accomplish.--adjs. COMPL[=E]T'ABLE; COMPL[=E]T'ED.--adv. COMPLETE'LY.--ns. COMPLETE'NESS, the state of being complete; COMPL[=E]'TION, the act of completing: the state of being complete: fulfilment.--adjs. COMPL[=E]T'IVE; COMPL[=E]T'ORY, fulfilling: completing. [L. compl[=e]re, -[=e]tum, to fill up--com, inten., and pl[=e]re, to fill.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  31. Having all its parts, entire; finished; unqualified, as c. surprise; (archaic, of persons) accomplished, as c. horseman. Hence completely adv., completeness n. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  32. Finish; make whole or perfect; make up the amount of. So completion n., completive a. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  33. Perfect, full, without any defects ; finished, ended, concluded. Complete Dictionary

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