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Definitions of concrete

  1. To form or unite in a mass; cover with concrete. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  2. To form into a hardened mass; coalesce; congeal; supply with concrete. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To unite into a solid mass. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4. cover with cement; "concrete the walls" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. form into a solid mass; coalesce Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. To form into a mass by the coalescence of separate particles. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  7. To unite or form into one mass; to congeal or grow hard. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  8. a strong hard building material composed of sand and gravel and cement and water Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. A solid mass of lime, sand, gravel, etc., used for bridges and buildings. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. Concreteness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  11. A mass formed by parts growing or sticking together: a mixture of lime, sand, pebbles, etc., used in building. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  12. A mass formed by parts growing together; compound of mortar and stones. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  13. A hardened mass, as of gravel and hydraulic cement. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. A concrete object. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. A mass formed by concretion; a compound; a mass of stone chippings, pebbles. &c., cemented by mortar. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  16. A compound; any mass formed of lime, sand, pebbles, &c. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  17. Concretely. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  18. formed by the coalescence of particles Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. United in growth; hence, formed by coalition of separate particles into one mass; united in a solid form. Newage Dictionary DB
  20. Standing for an object as it exists in nature, invested with all its qualities, as distinguished from standing for an attribute of an object; -- opposed to abstract. Newage Dictionary DB
  21. Applied to a specific object; special; particular; -- opposed to general. See Abstract, 3. Newage Dictionary DB
  22. A compound or mass formed by concretion, spontaneous union, or coalescence of separate particles of matter in one body. Newage Dictionary DB
  23. A mixture of gravel, pebbles, or broken stone with cement or with tar, etc., used for sidewalks, roadways, foundations, etc., and esp. for submarine structures. Newage Dictionary DB
  24. A term designating both a quality and the subject in which it exists; a concrete term. Newage Dictionary DB
  25. Sugar boiled down from cane juice to a solid mass. Newage Dictionary DB
  26. To unite or coalesce, as separate particles, into a mass or solid body. Newage Dictionary DB
  27. To form into a mass, as by the cohesion or coalescence of separate particles. Newage Dictionary DB
  28. To cover with, or form of, concrete, as a pavement. Newage Dictionary DB
  29. Formed into one mass: the opposite of abstract, and denoting a particular thing. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  30. Formed into one mass; denoting a real thing. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  31. To form or unite into a solid mass. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  32. Joined in or constituting a mass. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. Actually existing; real; individual; particular. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. Made of concrete. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. United in growth; formed by massing several things together; having a real existence; not abstract, but applied to a subject-as white, abstract, white sugar, concrete. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for concrete?

Usage examples for concrete

  1. Imagine my pleasant surprise when I found that it was not water at all, but a narrow white concrete path, evidently newly made. – 'Brother Bosch', an Airman's Escape from Germany by Gerald Featherstone Knight
  2. Now the tank was a dry, empty, shallow depression of concrete – The Film Mystery by Arthur B. Reeve
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