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Definitions of conquer

  1. take possession of without permission or take with force, as after a conquest or invasion; "the invaders seized the land and property of the inhabitants"; "The army seized the town"; "The militia captured the castle" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. to put down by force or authority; "suppress a nascent uprising"; "stamp down on littering"; "conquer one's desires" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. overcome by conquest; "conquer your fears"; "conquer a country" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. take possession of by force, as after an invasion; "the invaders seized the land and property of the inhabitants"; "The army seized the town"; "The militia captured the castle" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  5. To gain or acquire by force; to take possession of by violent means; to gain dominion over; to subdue by physical means; to reduce; to overcome by force of arms; to cause to yield; to vanquish. Newage Dictionary DB
  6. To subdue or overcome by mental or moral power; to surmount; as, to conquer difficulties, temptation, etc. Newage Dictionary DB
  7. To gain or obtain, overcoming obstacles in the way; to win; as, to conquer freedom; to conquer a peace. Newage Dictionary DB
  8. To gain the victory; to overcome; to prevail. Newage Dictionary DB
  9. To gain by conquest; overcome; subdue. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. To be victorious. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  11. Conqueror. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. To gain by force: to overcome or vanquish. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  13. To be victor. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  14. To gain by force; overcome; vanquish. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  15. To overcome; subdue; vanquish. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  16. To obtain as in war, or by any conflict. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  17. Conquerable. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  18. To subdue, especially in war and after a struggle; to gain dominion or sovereignty over; to overcome. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  19. To overcome; to gain the victory. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  20. To overcome by physical force, as an enemy in battle; to vanquish; to defeat; to subdue by argument or by moral influence; to gain by perseverance or effort. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  21. kong'k[.e]r, v.t. to gain by force or with an effort: to overcome or vanquish.--v.i. to be victor.--adj. CON'QUERABLE, that may be conquered.--n. CON'QUERABLENESS.--adj. CON'QUERING, victorious.--adv. CON'QUERINGLY.--ns. CON'QUEROR, one who conquers: a victor:--fem. CON'QUERESS; CON'QUEST, the act of conquering: that which is conquered or acquired by physical or moral force: the act of gaining the affections of another.--MAKE A CONQUEST, to conquer.--THE CONQUEROR, William I. of England (L. CONQUES'TOR); THE CONQUEST, the acquisition of the throne of England by William, Duke of Normandy, in 1066. [O. Fr. conquerre--L. conquir[)e]re,--con, inten., quær[)e]re, to seek.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  22. Overcome by force; get the better of (habit, passion, &c.); acquire, subjugate, (land). Hence conquerable a. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  23. stoop to c., use indirect means for gaining one\'s end. Concise Oxford Dictionary

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