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Definitions of converse

  1. To hold intercourse with; to interchange thoughts or talk familiarly with. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To interchange thoughts; talk familiarly. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  3. To have intercourse: to talk familiarly. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4. To have intercourse; talk familiarly. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  5. To speak together informally and alternately. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  6. To associate; commune. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  7. carry on a conversation Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. To talk familiarly with; to speak with, as a friend with a friend; to convey thoughts and opinions in friendly intercourse. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  9. a proposition obtained by conversion Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. To keep company; to hold intimate intercourse; to commune; -- followed by with. Newage Dictionary DB
  11. To engage in familiar colloquy; to interchange thoughts and opinions in a free, informal manner; to chat; -- followed by with before a person; by on, about, concerning, etc., before a thing. Newage Dictionary DB
  12. To have knowledge of, from long intercourse or study; -- said of things. Newage Dictionary DB
  13. Frequent intercourse; familiar communion; intimate association. Newage Dictionary DB
  14. Familiar discourse; free interchange of thoughts or views; conversation; chat. Newage Dictionary DB
  15. Turned about; reversed in order or relation; reciprocal; as, a converse proposition. Newage Dictionary DB
  16. A proposition which arises from interchanging the terms of another, as by putting the predicate for the subject, and the subject for the predicate; as, no virtue is vice, no vice is virtue. Newage Dictionary DB
  17. A proposition in which, after a conclusion from something supposed has been drawn, the order is inverted, making the conclusion the supposition or premises, what was first supposed becoming now the conclusion or inference. Thus, if two sides of a sides of a triangle are equal, the angles opposite the sides are equal; and the converse is true, i.e., if these angles are equal, the two sides are equal. Newage Dictionary DB
  18. Familiar intercourse: conversation. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  19. A proposition converted or turned about - i.e. one in which the subject and predicate have changed places. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. Familiar inter course; talk; the reverse of a proposition. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  21. Conversation; intercourse; communion. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. The reverse; an inverted proposition. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. Familiar discourse or talk. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  24. In math., an opposite proposition; in logic, a sentence or proposition in which the terms are interchanged, as putting the predicate for the subject. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  25. Conversely. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. of words so related that one reverses the relation denoted by the other; "`parental' and `filial' are converse terms" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  27. Reversed in order or relation; opposite. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. Reversed in order or relation. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  29. Transposed; reversed. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. Opposite; reciprocal. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for converse?

Usage examples for converse

  1. And what language did they converse in with her? – Joan of Arc by Ronald Sutherland Gower
  2. It seemed, at times, that they were speaking the language of angels of light; that I ought to fall at their feet, and ask their pardon for having spoken to them of questions on which a man of honour ought never to converse with a woman whom he respects. – The Priest, The Woman And The Confessional by Father Chiniquy
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