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Definitions of copula

  1. an equating verb (such as `be' or `become') that links the subject with the complement of a sentence Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. The stop which connects the manuals, or the manuals with the pedals; -- called also coupler. Newage Dictionary DB
  3. A word which joins the subject and predicate in a sentence. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  4. That which couples or joins together: a bond or tie: (logic) the word joining the subject and predicate. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  5. Is omitted, with few exceptions, in modern improved text-books. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  6. A word uniting the subject and predicate of a sentence, as the present indicative of the verb to be. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  7. That which couples; the word which unites the subject and predicate of a proposition. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  8. In logic, the word that couples or ties the predicate to the subject-namely, is, or is not. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for copula?

Usage examples for copula

  1. It is because all propositions are not affirmative that we require a copula at all. – Deductive Logic by St. George Stock
  2. To be, however, is not always a pure copula – Composition-Rhetoric by Stratton D. Brooks
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