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Definitions of coquet

  1. To trifle in love merely to win admiration. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To deceive with affected fondness; trifle in love. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To trifle with in love:-pr.p. coquetting; pa.p. coquetted. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4. To trifle with in love. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  5. To flirt; seek to attract attention or admiration. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  6. To excite admiration or love, from vanity, or to deceive. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  7. To attempt to excite admiration or love with intent to deceive. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  8. talk or behave amorously, without serious intentions; "The guys always try to chat up the new secretaries"; "My husband never flirts with other women" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. To attempt to attract the notice, admiration, or love of; to treat with a show of tenderness or regard, with a view to deceive and disappoint. Newage Dictionary DB
  10. To trifle with in love in order to gratify vanity. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  11. To trifle in love in order to gratify vanity; to attempt to attract admiration. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  12. Coquetted. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.

Usage examples for coquet

  1. I did not even coquet with them; because I found, on examining myself, I could not coquet with a man without loving him a little; and I perceived that I should not be able to stop at the line of what are termed innocent freedoms, did I suffer any. – Maria The Wrongs of Woman by Mary Wollstonecraft
  2. Well, here's the House, which holds the Lovely Prize quiet and serene; here no noisie Footmen throng to tell the World, that Beauty dwells within; no Ceremonious Visit makes the Lover wait; no Rival to give my Heart a Pang; who wou'd not scale the Window at Midnight without fear of the Jealous Father's Pistol, rather than fill up the Train of a Coquet where every Minute he is jostled out of Place. – The Busie Body by Susanna Centlivre Commentator: Jess Byrd
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