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Definitions of cord

  1. stack in cords, of wood Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a line made of twisted fibers or threads; "the bundle was tied with a cord" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a cut pile fabric with vertical ribs; usually made of cotton Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a light insulated conductor for household use Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a unit of amount of wood cut for burning; 128 cubic feet Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. bind or tie with a cord Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. stack in cords; "cord firewood" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  8. A string, or small rope, composed of several strands twisted together. Newage Dictionary DB
  9. A solid measure, equivalent to 128 cubic feet; a pile of wood, or other coarse material, eight feet long, four feet high, and four feet broad; -- originally measured with a cord or line. Newage Dictionary DB
  10. Fig.: Any moral influence by which persons are caught, held, or drawn, as if by a cord; an enticement; as, the cords of the wicked; the cords of sin; the cords of vanity. Newage Dictionary DB
  11. Any structure having the appearance of a cord, esp. a tendon or a nerve. See under Spermatic, Spinal, Umbilical, Vocal. Newage Dictionary DB
  12. See Chord. Newage Dictionary DB
  13. To bind with a cord; to fasten with cords; to connect with cords; to ornament or finish with a cord or cords, as a garment. Newage Dictionary DB
  14. To arrange (wood, etc.) in a pile for measurement by the cord. Newage Dictionary DB
  15. of Core Newage Dictionary DB
  16. A twisted string; a measure of wood equal to 128 cu. ft.; a tendon or nerve; a small rope. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. To fasten or connect with string or rope; to pile up, as wood, in piles 8 ft. by 4 ft. by 4 ft. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  18. 1. In anatomy, any long, string-like structure. 2. To become corded or string-like. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  19. (orig.) A chord: a small rope or thick kind of string. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. To bind with a cord. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  21. A thin rope; measure of wood of 128 cubic feet. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  22. To secure by a cord; to pile up for measurement, as wood. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  23. To bind with cord; furnish with cords. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. To pile (firewood) by the cord. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. A string of several strands. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. A measure for wood (128 cubic feet). The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. A string or thin rope, composed of several strands twisted together; a quantity of 128 cubic feet, originally measured with a cord; anything which binds or draws. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  28. A string or small rope having the strands or plies well twisted; a quantity of wood formerly measured by a cord; that by which persons are caught, held, or drawn; in Scrip., a snare; a musical string. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  29. To bind; to fasten with cords or rope. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  30. Any chord-like structure, as spinal, spermatic cord. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.
  31. [Greek] Any cord-like structure, as spinal cord, spermatic cord. na
  32. The materials of which cord was made varied according to the strength required; the strongest rope was probably made of strips of camel hide, as still used by the Bedouins. The finer sorts were made of flax, ( Isaiah 19:9 ) and probably of reeds and rushes. In the New Testament the term is applied to the whip which our Saviour made, ( John 2:15 ) and to the ropes of a ship. ( Acts 27:32 ) biblestudytools.com
  33. frequently used in its proper sense, for fastening a tent ( Exodus 35:18 ; 39:40 ), yoking animals to a cart ( Isaiah 5:18 ), binding prisoners ( Judges 15:13 ; Psalms 2:3 ; 129:4 ), and measuring ground ( 2 Samuel 82 ;2; Psalms 78:55 ). Figuratively, death is spoken of as the giving way of the tent-cord ( Job 4:21 . "Is not their tent-cord plucked up?" RSV). To gird one's self with a cord was a token of sorrow and humiliation. To stretch a line over a city meant to level it with the ground ( Lamentations 2:8 ). The "cords of sin" are the consequences or fruits of sin ( Proverbs 5:22 ). A "threefold cord" is a symbol of union (Eccl 4:12 ). The "cords of a man" ( Hosea 11:4 ) means that men employ, in inducing each other, methods such as are suitable to men, and not "cords" such as oxen are led by. ( Isaiah 5:18 ) says, "Woe unto them that draw iniquity with cords of vanity, and sin as it were with a cart rope." This verse is thus given in the Chaldee paraphrase: "Woe to those who begin to sin by little and little, drawing sin by cords of vanity: these sins grow and increase till they are strong and are like a cart rope." This may be the true meaning. The wicked at first draw sin with a slender cord; but by-and-by their sins increase, and they are drawn after them by a cart rope. Henderson in his commentary says: "The meaning is that the persons described were not satisfied with ordinary modes of provoking the Deity, and the consequent ordinary approach of his vengeance, but, as it were, yoked themselves in the harness of iniquity, and, putting forth all their strength, drew down upon themselves, with accelerated speed, the load of punishment which their sins deserved." biblestudytools.com
  34. A solid measure, equivalent to 128 cubic feet; a pile of wood, or other coarse material, eight feet long, four feet high, and four feet broad; originally measured with a cord or line. dictgcide_fs
  35. kord, n. a small rope or thick kind of string: something resembling a cord, as 'spinal cord,' 'umbilical cord,' &c.: (fig.) anything that binds or restrains: a measure of firewood, originally determined by the use of a cord or string.--v.t. to supply with a cord: to bind with a cord.--n. CORD'AGE, a quantity of cords or ropes, as the rigging of a ship, &c.--adj. CORD'ED, fastened with cords: furrowed, as with cords: (her.) wound about with cords: piled in 'cords.'--ns. CORD'-GRASS, a genus of grasses of which one species found in muddy salt-marshes is used for making ropes; CORD'ING, the act of binding: cordage; CORD'ITE, an approved smokeless gunpowder, so called from its cord-like appearance; CORD'-WOOD, wood put up in 'cords.' [Fr. corde--L. chorda. See CHORD.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  36. From the Latin Chorda, which is itself derived from intestine; and, afterwards, was applied to musical cords or strings, made of the intestines of animals. See Chorda. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  37. [Latin] Any elongated, rounded, band-like body; when used without qualification, the spinal c. and the umbilical c. (q. v.). See also Spermatic c. and Vocal c. na
  38. Thin rope, thick string; (Anat.) cord-like structure in animal body, as SPINAL, UMBILICAL, c., VOCAL cc.; cord-like rib on cloth; ribbed cloth, esp. corduroy; cc., corduroy breeches or trousers; measure of cutwood (usu. 128 cub. Ft.); (fig.) cc. of discipline, fourfold c. of evidence, &c.; (v.t.) bind with c. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  39. A stringlike structure; in common parlance, a tendon. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  40. A pile of wood eight feet long, four high, and four broad, containing 128 cubic feet. (From the cord with which it is measured.) Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  41. n. [Latin] [Greek] A string or small rope; —a solid measure for wood, &c., equivalent to 128 cubic feet; a pile eight feet long, four feet high, and four foot broad. Cabinet Dictionary
  42. A rope, a string; a quantity of wood for fuel; a pile eight feet long, four high, and four broad. Complete Dictionary

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