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Definitions of crowd

  1. an informal body of friends; "he still hangs out with the same crowd" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. fill or occupy to the point of overflowing; "The students crowded the auditorium" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a large number of things or people considered together; "a crowd of insects assembled around the flowers" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. to gather together in large numbers; "men in straw boaters and waxed mustaches crowded the verandah" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. cause to herd, drive, or crowd together; "We herded the children into a spare classroom" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. approach a certain age or speed; "She is pushing fifty" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. To push, to press, to shove. Newage Dictionary DB
  8. To press or drive together; to mass together. Newage Dictionary DB
  9. To fill by pressing or thronging together; hence, to encumber by excess of numbers or quantity. Newage Dictionary DB
  10. To press by solicitation; to urge; to dun; hence, to treat discourteously or unreasonably. Newage Dictionary DB
  11. To press together or collect in numbers; to swarm; to throng. Newage Dictionary DB
  12. To urge or press forward; to force one's self; as, a man crowds into a room. Newage Dictionary DB
  13. A number of things collected or closely pressed together; also, a number of things adjacent to each other. Newage Dictionary DB
  14. A number of persons congregated or collected into a close body without order; a throng. Newage Dictionary DB
  15. The lower orders of people; the populace; the vulgar; the rabble; the mob. Newage Dictionary DB
  16. An ancient instrument of music with six strings; a kind of violin, being the oldest known stringed instrument played with a bow. Newage Dictionary DB
  17. To play on a crowd; to fiddle. Newage Dictionary DB
  18. A number of persons or things collected closely together; the common people. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  19. To press closely together; fill to excess. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. To press in numbers. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. A number of persons or things closely pressed together, without order: the rabble: multitude. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. To gather into a lump or crowd: to fill by pressing or driving together. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  23. To press together in numbers: to swarm. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  24. A throng; multitude. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  25. To gather into a throng; fill by pressing in; encumber by numbers. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  26. To throng together. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  27. To fill to overflowing; pack; throng; push forward; urge. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. A numerous collection; multitude; throng. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. A number of things or persons collected closely and promiscuously together; the lower orders; the rabble. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. To press; to drive together; to fill to excess; to urge. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  31. To press in numbers or urge forward; to swarm. To crowd sail, to carry an extraordinary force of sail, or to carry a press of sail. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  32. A confused multitude of persons; a throng; a mob; a number of things together; the populace. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  33. To press together; to fill to excess; to encumber with numbers; to extend to the utmost, as a ship crowds on sails. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  34. krowd, n. a number of persons or things closely pressed together, without order: the rabble: multitude.--v.t. to gather into a lump or crowd: to fill by pressing or driving together: to compress.--v.i. to press on: to press together in numbers: to swarm.--p.adj. CROWD'ED.--CROWD SAIL, to carry a press of sail for speed. [A.S. crúdan, to press.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  35. krowd, n. (obs.) an ancient musical instrument of the nature of the violin.--n. CROWD'ER (obs.), a fiddler. [W. crwth, a hollow protuberance, a fiddle; Gael., Ir. cruit.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  36. Throng, dense multitude; the c., the masses; (colloq.) company, set, lot; large number (of things); (Naut.) c. of sail, large number of sails hoisted. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  37. Collect (t.&i.) in a crowd; fill, occupy, cram, (space &c. with); fill (place &c.) as a crowd does; force one\'s way into, through, &c. (confined space &c. or abs.); force (thing, person) into &c.; c. out, exclude by crowding; (Naut., of ship or crew) hasten on; c. sail, hoist unusual number of sails. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  38. would pass in a c., is not conspicuously defective &c. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  39. n. [Anglo-Saxon] A number of closely pressed together, or lying adjacent; —a number of persons congregated and pressed together; throng; multitude; populace; mob. Cabinet Dictionary
  40. A multitude confusedly pressed together; a promiscuous medley; the vulgar, the populace; a fiddle. Complete Dictionary

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