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Definitions of cut

  1. reduce in scope while retaining essential elements; "The manuscript must be shortened" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. in baseball; a batter's attempt to hit a pitched ball; "he took a vicious cut at the ball" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. cut down on; make a reduction in; "reduce your daily fat intake"; "The employer wants to cut back health benefits" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a refusal to recognize someone you know; "the snub was clearly intentional" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. turn sharply; change direction abruptly; "The car cut to the left at the intersection"; "The motorbike veered to the right" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. intentionally fail to attend; "cut class" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. an unexcused absence from class; "he was punished for taking too many cuts in his math class" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. the act of reducing the amount or number; "the mayor proposed extensive cuts in the city budget" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. the act of shortening something by cutting off the ends; "the barber gave him a good cut" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. the act of cutting something into parts; "his cuts were skillful"; "his cutting of the cake made a terrible mess" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. the act of penetrating or opening open with a sharp edge; "his cut in the lining revealed the hidden jewels" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. the division of a deck of cards before dealing; "his cutting the cards before every deal soon became a ritual" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. a stroke (in tennis or badminton or squash) that puts reverse spin on the ball; "cuts do not bother a good tennis player" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. a canal made by erosion or excavation Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. the omission that is made when an editorial change shortens a written passage; "an editor's deletions frequently upset young authors"; "both parties agreed on the excision of the proposed clause" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. cut down; "the tree is down" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. a piece of meat that has been cut from an animal carcass Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. cease, stop; "cut the noise"; "We had to cut short the conversation" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. lessen the strength or flavor of a solution or mixture; "cut bourbon" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. refuse to acknowledge; "She cut him dead at the meeting" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. (of a male animal) having the testicles removed; "a cut horse" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. a trench resembling a furrow that was made by erosion or excavation Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. a wound made by cutting; "he put a bandage over the cut" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  24. wounded by cutting deeply; "got a gashed arm in a knife fight"; "had a slashed cheek from the broken glass" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  25. informal: be able to manage or manage successfully; "I can't hack it anymore"; "she could not cut the long days in the office" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  26. make out and issue; "write out a check"; "cut a ticket"; "Please make the check out to me" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  27. (used of grass or vegetation) cut down with a hand implement or machine; "the smell of new-mown hay" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  28. weed out unwanted or unnecessary things; "We had to lose weight, so we cut the sugar from our diet" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  29. with parts removed; "the drastically cut film" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  30. (used of rates or prices) reduced usually sharply; "the slashed prices attracted buyers" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  31. a remark capable of wounding mentally; "the unkindest cut of all" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  32. cause to stop operating by disengaging a switch; "Turn off the stereo, please"; "cut the engine"; "turn out the lights" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  33. mixed with water; "sold cut whiskey"; "a cup of thinned soup" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  34. made neat and tidy by trimming; "his neatly trimmed hair" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  35. the division of a deck of cards before dealing; "he insisted that we give him the last cut before every deal"; "the cutting of the cards soon became a ritual" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  36. (sports) a stroke that puts reverse spin on the ball; "cuts do not bother a good tennis player" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  37. the style in which a garment is cut; "a dress of traditional cut" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  38. a distinct selection of music from a recording or a compact disc; "he played the first cut on the cd"; "the title track of the album" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  39. (film) an immediate transition from one shot to the next; "the cut from the accident scene to the hospital seemed too abrupt" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  40. a share of the profits; "everyone got a cut of the earnings" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  41. a step on some scale; "he is a cut above the the rest" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  42. cut off the testicles (of male animals such as horses); "the vet gelded the young horse" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  43. grow through the gums; "The new tooth is cutting" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  44. have grow through the gums; "The baby cut a tooth" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  45. cut and assemble the components of; "edit film"; "cut recording tape" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  46. have a reducing effect; "This cuts into my earnings" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  47. dissolve by breaking down the fat of; "soap cuts grease" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  48. shorten as if by severing the edges or ends of; "cut my hair" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  49. penetrate injuriously; "The glass from the shattered windshield cut into her forehead" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  50. fell by sawing; hew; "The Vietnamese cut a lot of timber while they occupied Cambodia" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  51. reap or harvest; "cut grain" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  52. hit (a ball) with a spin so that it turns in the opposite direction; "cut a pingpong ball" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  53. separate with or as if with an instrument; "Cut the rope" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  54. divide a deck of cards at random into two parts to make selection difficult; "Wayne cut"; "She cut the deck for a long time" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  55. make an incision or separation; "cut along the dotted line" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  56. allow incision or separation; "This bread cuts easily" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  57. function as a cutting instrument; "This knife cuts well" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  58. perform or carry out; "cut a caper" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  59. form or shape by cutting or incising; "cut paper dolls" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  60. form by probing, penetrating, or digging; "cut a hole"; "cut trenches"; "The sweat cut little rivulets into her face" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  61. create by duplicating data; "cut a disk"; "burn a CD" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  62. record a performance on (a medium); "cut a record" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  63. make a recording of; "cut the songs"; "She cut all of her major titles again" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  64. stop filming; "cut a movie scene" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  65. make an abrupt change of image or sound; "cut from one scene to another" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  66. pass through or across; "The boat cut the water" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  67. pass directly and often in haste; "We cut through the neighbor's yard to get home sooner" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  68. move (one's fist); "his opponent cut upward toward his chin" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  69. give the appearance or impression of; "cut a nice figure" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  70. discharge from a group; "The coach cut two players from the team" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  71. separated into parts or laid open or penetrated with a sharp edge or instrument; "the cut surface was mottled"; "cut tobacco"; "blood from his cut forehead"; "bandages on her cut wrists" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  72. (of pages of a book) having the folds of the leaves trimmed or slit; "the cut pages of the book" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  73. fashioned or shaped by cutting; "a well-cut suit"; "cut diamonds"; "cut velvet" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  74. having a long rip or tear; "a split lip" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  75. of Cut Newage Dictionary DB
  76. To separate the parts of with, or as with, a sharp instrument; to make an incision in; to gash; to sever; to divide. Newage Dictionary DB
  77. To sever and cause to fall for the purpose of gathering; to hew; to mow or reap. Newage Dictionary DB
  78. To sever and remove by cutting; to cut off; to dock; as, to cut the hair; to cut the nails. Newage Dictionary DB
  79. To castrate or geld; as, to cut a horse. Newage Dictionary DB
  80. To form or shape by cutting; to make by incision, hewing, etc.; to carve; to hew out. Newage Dictionary DB
  81. To wound or hurt deeply the sensibilities of; to pierce; to lacerate; as, sarcasm cuts to the quick. Newage Dictionary DB
  82. To intersect; to cross; as, one line cuts another at right angles. Newage Dictionary DB
  83. To refuse to recognize; to ignore; as, to cut a person in the street; to cut one's acquaintance. Newage Dictionary DB
  84. To absent one's self from; as, to cut an appointment, a recitation. etc. Newage Dictionary DB
  85. To do the work of an edged tool; to serve in dividing or gashing; as, a knife cuts well. Newage Dictionary DB
  86. To admit of incision or severance; to yield to a cutting instrument. Newage Dictionary DB
  87. To perform the operation of dividing, severing, incising, intersecting, etc.; to use a cutting instrument. Newage Dictionary DB
  88. To make a stroke with a whip. Newage Dictionary DB
  89. To interfere, as a horse. Newage Dictionary DB
  90. To move or make off quickly. Newage Dictionary DB
  91. To divide a pack of cards into two portion to decide the deal or trump, or to change the order of the cards to be dealt. Newage Dictionary DB
  92. An opening made with an edged instrument; a cleft; a gash; a slash; a wound made by cutting; as, a sword cut. Newage Dictionary DB
  93. A stroke or blow or cutting motion with an edged instrument; a stroke or blow with a whip. Newage Dictionary DB
  94. That which wounds the feelings, as a harsh remark or criticism, or a sarcasm; personal discourtesy, as neglecting to recognize an acquaintance when meeting him; a slight. Newage Dictionary DB
  95. A notch, passage, or channel made by cutting or digging; a furrow; a groove; as, a cut for a railroad. Newage Dictionary DB
  96. The surface left by a cut; as, a smooth or clear cut. Newage Dictionary DB
  97. A portion severed or cut off; a division; as, a cut of beef; a cut of timber. Newage Dictionary DB
  98. An engraved block or plate; the impression from such an engraving; as, a book illustrated with fine cuts. Newage Dictionary DB
  99. The act of dividing a pack cards. Newage Dictionary DB
  100. The right to divide; as, whose cut is it? Newage Dictionary DB
  101. Manner in which a thing is cut or formed; shape; style; fashion; as, the cut of a garment. Newage Dictionary DB
  102. A common work horse; a gelding. Newage Dictionary DB
  103. The failure of a college officer or student to be present at any appointed exercise. Newage Dictionary DB
  104. A skein of yarn. Newage Dictionary DB
  105. Gashed or divided, as by a cutting instrument. Newage Dictionary DB
  106. Formed or shaped as by cutting; carved. Newage Dictionary DB
  107. Overcome by liquor; tipsy. Newage Dictionary DB
  108. To deflect (a bowled ball) to the off, with a chopping movement of the bat. Webster Dictionary DB
  109. To drive (an object ball) to either side by hitting it fine on the other side with the cue ball or another object ball. Webster Dictionary DB
  110. To strike (a ball) with the racket inclined or struck across the ball so as to put a certain spin on the ball. Webster Dictionary DB
  111. To drive (a ball) to one side by hitting with another ball. Webster Dictionary DB
  112. A slanting stroke causing the ball to spin and bound irregularly; also, the spin so given to the ball. Webster Dictionary DB
  113. A stroke on the off side between point and the wicket; also, one who plays this stroke. Webster Dictionary DB
  114. To reduce. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  115. To cleave or separate with a sharp instrument; make an incision in; divide; trim; intersect; diminish; colloquially, to pass deliberately without recognition; wound deeply; divide (a pack of cards) at random; colloquially, to absent oneself from; as, to cut a class. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  116. To make an incision; do the work of a sharp instrument; as, the knife cuts well; to make a short cut by going across; as, we cut across the field. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  117. An incision or wound made by a sharp instrument; gash; a sharp stroke; a slight; a groove, made by digging; a slice; a straight, short passage; as, a short cut to a place; a block on which an engraving is made; the fashion of a garment; shape; colloquially, the deliberate ignoring of an acquaintance; the division of a pack of cards; one of several pieces used in drawing lots; a reduction in price. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  118. Cut. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  119. Cutting. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  120. To make an incision: to cleave or pass through: to divide: to carve or hew: to wound or hurt: to affect deeply: to castrate:-pr.p. cutting; pa.t. and pa.p. cut. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  121. A cleaving or dividing: a stroke or blow: an incision or wound: a piece cut off: an engraved block, or the picture from it: manner of cutting, or fashion. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  122. An incision; blow; piece cut off; small engraving; near passage. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  123. To make incision in; cleave; hew; wound or pain. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  124. To divide, trim, or shape, as with a knife; make a cut; server; clip; hew; wound. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  125. To hurt; pain; grieve. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  126. To pass without recognition. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  127. Formed or affected by cutting; wounded; severed. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  128. An incision; a gash; slit. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  129. A cutting motion or action. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  130. A short way, as across a corner. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  131. Fashion; form; style. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  132. Print. An engraved black, or a picture printed from it. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  133. Gashed; divided, &c. Cut and dry or dried, prepared for use. Cut-grass, spear-grass. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  134. The opening, cleft, gash, or wound, made by an edged instrument; a stroke or blow, as with a whip; a wound to one's feelings; a channel made by cutting or digging; a piece cut off; a near passage by which an angle is cut off; a picture cut or carved on wood or metal; the stamp on which a picture is carved, and by which it is impressed; the impression; the act of dividing a pack of cards; shape in which a thing is cut. To draw cuts, to draw lots, as of paper cut for the purpose. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  135. To separate or cleave as with a knife; to make an incision; to sever; to divide; to hew; to mow; to carve; to wound or affect deeply; to intersect or cross; to castrate. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  136. To sever, as a knife; to lie divided by a knife; to divide by passing through; to perform a surgical operation by cutting, especially in lithotomy; to divide a pack of cards. To cut across, to pass by a shorter course, so as to cut off an angle. To cut asunder, to cut in pieces; to sever. To cat down, to fell by severing. To cut off, to separate one part from another; to extirpate; to put to untimely death; to interrupt; to intercept; to end; to finish. To cut out, to remove by cutting or carving: to contrive or prepare to take the precedence of. To cut out a ship, to enter a harbour, and seize and carry off a ship by a sudden attack. To cut short, to stop by interruption; to shorten; to abridge. To cut up, to cut in pieces; to eradicate; to criticise severely; to affect deeply. To cut one's acquaintance, to meet him in the street or elsewhere, and pretend not to see or recognize him. To cut a caper, to frisk about. To cut a dash, to make a show. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  137. To separate by a cutting instrument; to divide; to sever; to hew, as timber; to penetrate or pierce; to affect deeply; to intersect or cross; to intercept. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  138. A stroke or blow with a sharp instrument; a cleft; a notch; a gash; a channel or ditch made by digging or cutting; a part cut off; a carving or engraving, likewise the print from it; form; shape; fashion. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  139. Divided; carved; intersected. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  140. Divided; pierced; deeply affected: to cut a figure, to show off conspicuously: to cut a joke, to be witty and sociable: to cut down, to reduce; to retrench; to fell, as timber: to cut off, to separate; to destroy; to intercept: to cut up, to divide into pieces: to be cut up, applied to an army in the field that has lost many men in killed and wounded: to cut out, to remove a part; to shape: to cut out a ship, to enter a harbour and seize and carry off a ship by a sudden attack: to cut short, to abridge: to cut one's acquaintance, to refuse or avoid recognising him when meeting or passing each other: to cut a knot, to effect anything by short and strong measures: to cut the cards, to divide a pack into two portions: to cut and dry, or dried, prepared for use: to cut in, to divide; to join in anything suddenly: to draw cuts, to draw lots by means of straws or pieces of paper, & c., cut in pieces of different lengths and held between the forefinger and thumb. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  141. kut, v.t. to make an incision in: to cleave or pass through: to divide: to carve, hew, or fashion by cutting: to wound or hurt: to affect deeply: to shorten: to break off acquaintance with, to pass intentionally without saluting: to renounce, give up: to castrate: to perform or execute, as 'to cut a caper.'--v.i. to make an incision: to pass, go quickly: (slang) to run away, to be off: to twiddle the feet rapidly in dancing:--pr.p. cut'ting; pa.t. and pa.p. cut.--n. a cleaving or dividing: a stroke or blow: an act of unkindness: the card obtained by cutting or dividing the pack: an incision or wound: a piece cut off: an engraved block, or the picture from it: manner of cutting, or, fashion: (pl.) a lot.--n. CUT'AWAY', a coat with the skirt cut away in a curve in front--also adj.--ns. CUT'-OFF, that which cuts off or shortens, a straighter road, a shorter channel cut by a river across a bend: a contrivance for saving steam by regulating its admission to the cylinder; CUT'PURSE (Shak.), one who stole by cutting off and carrying away purses (the purses being worn at the girdle): a pickpocket; CUT'TER, the person or thing that cuts: in a tailor's shop, the one who measures and cuts out the cloth: a small vessel with one mast, a mainsail, a forestaysail, and a jib set to bowsprit-end, any sloop of narrow beam and deep draught; CUT'-THROAT, an assassin: ruffian; CUT'TING, a dividing or lopping off: an incision: a piece cut off: a paragraph from a newspaper: a piece of road or railway excavated: a twig; CUT'-WA'TER, the fore-part of a ship's prow.--CUT A DASH, or FIGURE, to make a conspicuous appearance; CUT-AND-COME-AGAIN, abundant supply, from the notion of cutting a slice, and returning at will for another; CUT-AND-COVER, a method of forming a tunnel by cutting out, arching it over, and then covering in; CUT-AND-DRY, or CUT-AND-DRIED, ready made, without the merit of freshness--from the state of herbs in the shop instead of the field; CUT AND RUN, to be off quickly; CUT DOWN, to take down the body of one hanged by cutting the rope: to reduce, curtail; CUT IN, to strike into, as to a conversation, a game at whist; CUT IT TOO FAT, to overdo a thing; CUT OFF, to destroy, put to an untimely death: intercept: stop; CUT OFF WITH A SHILLING, to disinherit, bequeathing only a shilling; CUT ONE'S STICK, to take one's departure; CUT OUT, to shape: contrive: debar: supplant: to take a ship out of a harbour, &c., by getting between her and the shore; CUT SHORT, to abridge: check; CUT THE COAT ACCORDING TO THE CLOTH, to adapt one's self to circumstances; CUT THE TEETH, to have the teeth grow through the gums--of an infant; CUT THE THROAT OF (fig.), to destroy utterly; CUT UP, to carve: eradicate: criticise severely: turn out (well or ill) when divided into parts; CUT UP ROUGH, to become quarrelsome.--A CUT ABOVE (coll.), a degree or stage above; SHORT CUT, or NEAR CUT, a short way. [Prob. W. cwtau, shorten.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  142. A common expression for the division or solution of continuity made by a sharp instrument. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  143. Act of cutting; stroke, blow, with knife, sword, whip; c. & thrust, hand-to-hand struggle; excision (of part of a play &c.); act, speech, that wounds the feelings; particular stroke in cricket, lawn tennis, croquet, &c.; refusal to recognize an acquaintance; short c., crossing that shortens the distance; fashion, style, (of clothes, hair, &c.); a c. (degree, stage) above; wound made by cutting; railway cutting; narrow opening in floor of stage of theatre, by which scenes are moved up& down; =woodcut; piece (esp. of meat) cut off; draw cc., draw lots with sticks of unequal length (prob. a different word). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  144. (cut). Penetrate, wound, with edged instrument, as the knife c. his finger, he c. his finger with a knife; (fig.) a cutting wind, cutting retort, it c. him to the heart, whence cuttingly adv.; divide with knife &c. in two, in or into pieces; (fig.) c. (renounce) a connexion; detach by cutting; carve (meat); cross, intersect, as two lines c. each other; (intr.) pass through, across, &c. (slang) run away; reduce by cutting (hair &c.); shape, fashion, by cutting (coat, gem, &c.); perform, execute, make, as c. a caper, dash, joke, figure; divide (pack of cards) so as to determine deal, prevent cheating, &c.; hit (ball) in particular way, in cricket &c.; renounce acquaintance of (person), decline to recognize him, esp. c. him dead; absent oneself from, avoid, renounce, as c. a lecture, c. the whole concern; c. a tooth, have it appear through gum; c. short, shorten by cutting (lit. & fig.), also interrupt; c. one\'s stick, go; c. coat according to cloth; c. down, bring or throw down by cutting, (fig.) reduce (expenses); c. in (intr.), enter abruptly, interpose (in conversation), (Cards) join in game by taking place of player who cuts out; c. off, remove by cutting, bring to an end, intercept (supplies, communications), exclude (from access &c.); c. off with a shilling, disinherit by bequeathing a shilling; c. out, remove by cutting, (fig.) out-do or supplant (rival), fashion or shape (lit. & fig.), prepare, as his work is c. out for him, (Cards, intr.) be excluded from game as result of cutting; c. up, c. in pieces, destroy utterly, (fig.) criticize severely, (usu. pass.) distress greatly, c. up (well), leave (large) fortune, c. up rough, show resentment; c.-&-come-again, abundance; c. & dried or dry (of opinions &c.), ready-made, lacking freshness; cutpurse, thief; cut-throat, murderer. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  145. c. of person\'s jib (slang), personal appearance; c.-out, device in motor for releasing gas rapidly without passage through silencer. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  146. c. a loss, withdraw promptly from a losing speculation or enterprise; c. and run (slang), run away, make off; c. a record, break it; c. one\'s eye or wisdom teeth, attain discretion; c. prices, undersell competitors; c. the knot, dispose of difficulty in rough-&-ready manner (see also GORDIAN). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  147. n. An opening made with a sharp instrument; a gash; a wound;—a stroke or blow with an edged instrument, whip, or the like;—a harsh remark, or avoidance of one’s acquaintance;—a notch, passage, or channel made by cutting;—a portion severed or cut off;—an engraved block; the impression from an engraving;—the act of dividing a pack of cards;—the right to divide;—manner in which a thing is cut for formed; shape; style; fashion. Cabinet Dictionary
  148. Prepared for use. Complete Dictionary
  149. The action of a sharp or edged instrument; the impression or separation of continuity, made by an edge; a wound made by cutting; a channel made by art; a part cut off from the rest; a small particle, a shred; a lot cut off a stick; a near passage, by which some angle is cut off; a picture cut or carved upon a stamp of wood, or copper, and impressed from it; the act or practice of dividing a pack of cards; fashion, form, shape, manner of cutting into shape; a fool or cully; Cut and long tail, men of all kinds. Complete Dictionary

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