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Definitions of cycle

  1. ride a bicycle Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the unit of frequency; one Hertz has a periodic interval of one second Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. cause to go through a cycle Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a shortened version of `bicycle' or `tricycle' or `motorcycle' Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a single complete execution of a periodically repeated phenomenon; "a year constitutes a cycle of the seasons" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a periodically repeated sequence of events; "a cycle of reprisal and retaliation" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a series of poems or songs on the same theme; "schubert's song cycles" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. an interval during which a recurring sequence of events occurs; "the neverending cycle of the seasons" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. recur in cycles Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. ride a motorcycle Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a wheeled vehicle that has two wheels and is moved by foot pedals Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. recur in repeating sequences Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. pass through a cycle; "This machine automatically cycles" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. cause to go through a recurring sequence; "cycle thge laundry in this washing program" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. An imaginary circle or orbit in the heavens; one of the celestial spheres. Newage Dictionary DB
  16. An interval of time in which a certain succession of events or phenomena is completed, and then returns again and again, uniformly and continually in the same order; a periodical space of time marked by the recurrence of something peculiar; as, the cycle of the seasons, or of the year. Newage Dictionary DB
  17. An age; a long period of time. Newage Dictionary DB
  18. An orderly list for a given time; a calendar. Newage Dictionary DB
  19. The circle of subjects connected with the exploits of the hero or heroes of some particular period which have served as a popular theme for poetry, as the legend of Arthur and the knights of the Round Table, and that of Charlemagne and his paladins. Newage Dictionary DB
  20. One entire round in a circle or a spire; as, a cycle or set of leaves. Newage Dictionary DB
  21. A bicycle or tricycle, or other light velocipede. Newage Dictionary DB
  22. To pass through a cycle of changes; to recur in cycles. Newage Dictionary DB
  23. To ride a bicycle, tricycle, or other form of cycle. Newage Dictionary DB
  24. A series of operations in which heat is imparted to (or taken away from) a working substance which by its expansion gives up a part of its internal energy in the form of mechanical work (or being compressed increases its internal energy) and is again brought back to its original state. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. A complete positive and negative wave of an alternating current; one period. The number of cycles (per second) is a measure of the frequency of an alternating current. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. A period of time, or order of events, which repeats itself regularly; a revolution of a certain period of time; an imaginary circle in the heavens; the stories surrounding some famous event or hero; as, the Arthurian cycle; an age; a bicycle or tricycle. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. To ride a bicycle or tricycle. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. Cycler, cyclist. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  29. Cycled. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  30. Cycling. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  31. A recurrent series of events. A recurring period of time. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  32. A period of time in which events happen in a certain order, and which constantly repeats itself: an imaginary circle or orbit in the heavens. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  33. Cyclic. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.
  34. Recurring period of time; circle or orbit. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  35. A recurring period of time; a round of years or of ages; a vast period. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. A turn or circle; loop. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. A bicycle, tricycle, etc. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. A series of years, events, or phenomena which recur in the same order; a long period; an imaginary circle in the heavens: a body of legend connected with some mythical subject. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. To revolve in a circle. The cycle of the moon, or golden number, or Metonic cycle a period of nineteen years, after which the new and full moons return on the same days of the month. The cycle of the sun, a period of twenty-eight years. Cycle of indiction, a period of fifteen years. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. The revolution of a certain period of time which finishes and begins again in a perpetual circle; a round of years in which the same course begins again; cycle of the moon, or golden number, a period of 19 years, at the end of which the new and full moons occur again on the same days of the month; cycle of the sun, a period of 28 years; cycle of indiction, a period of 15 years. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  41. The circulation of a fluid through a definite series of vessels. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.
  42. [Greek] The circulation of a fluid through a definite series of vessels; recurrent series of phenomena, as life cycle, ovarian cycle, etc. na
  43. A basic unit of computation, one period of a computerclock.Each instruction takes a number of clock cycles. Often thecomputer can access its memory once on every clock cycle, andso one speaks also of "memory cycles".Every hacker wants more cycles (noted hacker Bill Gosperdescribes himself as a "cycle junkie"). There are only somany cycles per second, and when you are sharing a computerthe cycles get divided up among the users. The more cyclesthe computer spends working on your program rather thansomeone else's, the faster your program will run. That's whyevery hacker wants more cycles: so he can spend less timewaiting for the computer to respond.The use of the term "cycle" for a computer clock period canprobably be traced back to the rotation of a generatorgenerating alternating current though computers generally usea clock signal which is more like a square wave.Interestingly, the earliest mechanical calculators,e.g. Babbage's Difference Engine, really did have partswhich rotated in true cycles. foldoc_fs
  44. s[=i]'kl, n. a period of time in which events happen in a certain order, and which constantly repeats itself: an imaginary circle or orbit in the heavens: a series of poems, prose romances, &c., centring round a figure or event--also CY'CLUS: an abbreviation for bicycle and tricycle.--v.i. to move in cycles: to ride or take exercise on a bicycle or tricycle.--adjs. CY'CLIC, -AL, pertaining to or containing a cycle.--ns. CY'CLIST, for bicyclist or tricyclist; CY'CLOGRAPH, an instrument for describing the arcs of circles that have too large a curvature for compasses; CY'CLOID, a figure like a circle: a curve made by a point in a circle, when the circle is rolled along a straight line.--adj. CYCLOID'AL.--ns. CYCLOID'IAN, one of the fourth order of fishes, according to the classification of Agassiz, having cycloid scales with smooth edges, as the salmon; CYCLOM'ETER, an instrument for measuring circular arcs: an apparatus attached to the wheel of a cycle for registering the distance traversed; CY'CLORN, a cycle-horn. [Gr. kyklos, a circle.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  45. A period or revolution of a certain number of years or days. The Methodists gave this name to an aggregate of curative means, continued during a certain number of days. Nine was the usual number. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  46. [Greek] One of a number of successively repeated periods, at the end of each one of which the phenomena present at its beginning start in anew and repeat themselves; as Cardiac c. na
  47. Recurrent period (of events, phenomena, &c.); Metonic or Lunar c., one of 19 years, used for finding date of Easter; period of a thing\'s completion; complete set or series; series of poems collected round a central event &c.; bicycle, tricycle, or similar machine; (v.i.) revolve in cc., ride c. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  48. c. car, kinds of light motor-car of simplified pattern usu. with three wheels and without water-cooling radiator. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  49. A succession or round of symptoms. American pocket medical dictionary.
  50. A period of time in which a certain series of events or acts is completed, especially if repeated again and again. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  51. A course of diet and exercise arranged in a definite manner, for a certain end. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  52. [Gr., a ring, circles] The Continual recurrence of a set of events in an assigned order. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  53. The period during which the occurrence of one set takes place. The Solar C. consists of twenty-eight Julian years, after the lapse of which, on the Julian system, the same days of the week would always return to the same days of each month throughout the year. The Lunar C. consists of 235 lunations, which do not differ from nineteen Julian years by quite an hour and a half. Consequently, if in any one period of nineteen years the days of the occurrence of all the new moons (or full moons) are noted, they will be found to recur on or very near to the same days in the same order in the next period of nineteen years, and so on. These nineteen years constitute a Lunar or Metonic C., the fact of the recurrence having been discovered by Meton, an Athenian mathematician, circ. 432 B.C. The Golden Number of a year denotes its place in the lunar C. The Calippic C. (Calippus, of Cyzicus, circ. 320 B.C.) was designed as an improvement on the Metonic C., and consists of seventy-six years, or four Metonic C. The adoption of this C. in combination with the Julian calendar brings the succession of new moons back to the same day, and nearly the same hour of the day. C. of indictions, a period of fifteen years, used in the courts of law and in the fiscal organization of the Roman Empire under Constantine and his successor ; it was thus introduced into legal dates as the Golden Number was introduced into ecclesiastical dates. To find the prime number or year of the solar C., add 9 to the number of the year A.D. and divide by 28 ; to find the Golden Number or year of the lunar C., add 1 and divide by 19 ; to find the indiction, add 3 and divide by 15 : the remainder, if any, is the required year ; if none, the year is the twenty-eighth, nineteenth, and fifteenth of these C. respectively. C. of operations, in thermodynamics, a series of operations by which a substance working in a heat-engine (as steam in a steam-engine) is finally brought to the same state in all respects as at first. When a C. of operations can be gone through first in a given order, and then in the reverse order, the cycle is said to be a Reversible C. If a heat-engine were capable of performing a reversible C. of operations, it would by dynamically perfect. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  54. n. [Greek] An imaginary circle or orbit in the heavens;—a period of time in which a succession of events or phenomena is repeated in the same order;—one entire round in a spire or circle. Cabinet Dictionary
  55. A circle; around of time, a space in which the same revolution begins again, a periodical space of time; a method, or account of a method, continued till the same course begins again; imaginary orbs, a circle in the heavens. Complete Dictionary

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