Spellcheck.net

Language:

English - United States Change

Enter your text below and click here to check the spelling

Definitions of damp

  1. To make moist; dampen; discourage; check. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  2. To wet slightly: to chill: to discourage: to check: to make dull. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  3. To moisten; discourage; lessen. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  4. deaden (a sound or noise), esp. by wrapping Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. lessen in force or effect; "soften a shock"; "break a fall" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. To moisten; to chill: to weaken; to deaden; to check; to discourage Choke-damp, carbonic acid gas. Fire-damp, carburetted hydrogen. See Damps. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  7. To moisten; to make slightly wet; to depress or discourage; to weaken; to check or restrain. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  8. Being in a state between dry and wet; moderately wet; moist; humid. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. Dejected; depressed; sunk. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. a slight wetness Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. Moisture; humidity; fog; fogginess; vapor. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Dejection; depression; cloud of the mind. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To render damp; to moisten; to make humid, or moderately wet; to dampen; as, to damp cloth. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To put out, as fire; to depress or deject; to deaden; to cloud; to check or restrain, as action or vigor; to make dull; to weaken; to discourage. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. Moisture; fog: a poisonous gas sometimes formed in coal mines. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. Dampness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  17. Vapor, mist: moist air: lowness of spirits:-pl. dangerous vapors in mines, etc. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  18. Moisture; moist air. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  19. Moisture; dampness; fog; mist; poisonous gas in mines. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  20. Moist air; humidity; fog; depression of spirits. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  21. Moist air; moisture; fog; vapour; depression of spirits; dejection. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  22. Damply. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. slightly wet; "clothes damp with perspiration"; "a moist breeze"; "eyes moist with tears" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  24. Moist; foggy; humid. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  25. Moist: foggy. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  26. Somewhat wet; moist. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  27. Clammy; cold. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. Moist; humid; depressed; chilled. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29. In a state between dry and wet; moist; humid. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

Usage examples for damp

  1. Well, to be sure they are damp – Historical Romances: Under the Red Robe, Count Hannibal, A Gentleman of France by Stanley J. Weyman
  2. Unconsciously he put his hand to his forehead, which was damp with the heat of the printing- office which he had just left. – The Slave Of The Lamp by Henry Seton Merriman
X