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Definitions of dash

  1. To strike against and break; to rush with violence. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To break, as by throwing or by collision; to shatter; to crust; to frustrate; to ruin. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To put to shame; to confound; to confuse; to abash; to depress. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To throw in or on in a rapid, careless manner; to mix, reduce, or adulterate, by throwing in something of an inferior quality; to overspread partially; to bespatter; to touch here and there; as, to dash wine with water; to dash paint upon a picture. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To throw with violence or haste; to cause to strike violently or hastily; - often used with against. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To form or sketch rapidly or carelessly; to execute rapidly, or with careless haste; - with off; as, to dash off a review or sermon. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To erase by a stroke; to strike out; knock out; - with out; as, to dash out a word. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To throw violently or hastily; break by collision; hurl; shatter; splash; ruin; as, to dash one's hopes; to perform hastily, as writing; depress; confuse. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  9. To throw violently: to break by throwing together: to throw water suddenly: to bespatter: to destroy or frustrate: to mix or adulterate. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  10. To throw or strike suddenly or violently; to destroy or frustrate. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  11. To throw suddenly and violently; hurl; shatter; splash. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. To sketch hastily; with off. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  13. To discourage; abash. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. To rust with violence; to move impetuously; to strike violently; as, the waves dash upon rocks. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To rush with violence; strike something on a surface with a violent noisy motion. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  16. To strike against: to break against, as water: to rush with violence. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  17. To rush or strike against. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  18. hurl or thrust violently; "He dashed the plate against the wall"; "Waves were dashing against the rock" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. run or move very quickly or hastily; "She dashed into the yard" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. destroy or break; "dashed ambitions and hopes" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. add an enlivening or altering element to; "blue paint dashed with white" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. break into pieces, as by striking or knocking over; "Smash a plate" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. cause to lose courage; "dashed by the refusal" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  24. To rush impetuously. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. To strike suddenly or violently; to break by collision; to throw water suddenly; to be spatter; to sprinkle; to mix and adulterate by throwing in another substance; to erase at a stroke; to destroy; to frustrate; to confound; to abash. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  26. To strike with suddenness or violence; to throw water suddenly; to mix or adulterate; to blot out; to scatter; to rush or strike with suddenness; to break through with violence. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  27. a footrace run at top speed; "he is preparing for the 100-yard dash" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  28. Violent striking together of two bodies; collision; crash. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. A sudden check; abashment; frustration; ruin; as, his hopes received a dash. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. A slight admixture, infusion, or adulteration; a partial overspreading; as, wine with a dash of water; red with a dash of purple. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. A rapid movement, esp. one of short duration; a quick stroke or blow; a sudden onset or rush; as, a bold dash at the enemy; a dash of rain. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. Energy in style or action; animation; spirit. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. A vain show; a blustering parade; a flourish; as, to make or cut a great dash. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. A mark or line [--], in writing or printing, denoting a sudden break, stop, or transition in a sentence, or an abrupt change in its construction, a long or significant pause, or an unexpected or epigrammatic turn of sentiment. Dashes are also sometimes used instead of marks or parenthesis. Newage Dictionary DB
  35. The line drawn through a figure in the thorough bass, as a direction to raise the interval a semitone. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. A mark or line [-], in writing or printing, denoting a sudden break, stop, or transition in a sentence, or an abrupt change in its construction, a long or significant pause, or an unexpected or epigrammatic turn of sentiment. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. The sign of staccato, a small mark [] denoting that the note over which it is placed is to be performed in a short, distinct manner. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. A short, spirited effort or trial of speed upon a race course; - used in horse racing, when a single trial constitutes the race. Webster Dictionary DB
  39. A collision; a slight addition; a vulgar display; as, to cut a dash with fine clothes; a mark in writing or printing; something that causes discouragement; the striking of water in noisy motion; as, the dash of the waves; a sudden rush; a short, very quick race. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  40. A violent striking: a rushing or violent onset: a blow: a mark (-) at a break in a sentence: a slight admixture. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  41. Collision; onset; impetuosity; the mark (-) in writing or printing. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  42. A sudden onset; rush; impetuosity; spirit; display. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  43. A check; collision. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  44. A slight admixture. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  45. A line as a mark of punctuation, etc. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  46. A violent striking of two bodies; a slight admixture; a rushing or onset with violence; a sudden stroke; a blow; a sudden check; swift action; a mark noting a break in the sentence, thus -; a small mark. thus ('), denoting that the note over which it is placed is to be performed in a short distinct manner. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  47. A striking together of two bodies; collision; a slight addition; a rushing or onset; a sudden stroke, flourish, or parade; in writing or printing, a mark thus (-); in music, thus (1), over a note. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for dash?

Usage examples for dash

  1. I saw him dash away the tears from his face with the back of his driving glove. – Youth and the Bright Medusa by Willa Cather
  2. The trader looked at the watch as if he intended to make a dash to recover it, but the girl kept him steadily covered with his own revolver. – Mystery Ranch by Arthur Chapman
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