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Definitions of date

  1. To reckon; to begin; to be dated. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To note the time of writing or executing; to express in an instrument the time of its execution; as, to date a letter, a bond, a deed, or a charter. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To note or fix the time of, as of an event; to give the date of; as, to date the building of the pyramids. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To mark with a definite time; to find the definite time of. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  5. To affix the date to. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  6. To note the time of. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  7. To mark with a date; assign a date to. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  8. To have beginning; to begin; to be dated or reckoned; - with from. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To bear the statement of a time; reckon to have existed from a given time. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. To reckon time. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  11. date regularly; have a steady relationship with; "Did you know that she is seeing an older man?"; "He is dating his former wife again!" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. assign a date to; determine the (probable) date of; "Scientists often cannot date precisely archeological or prehistorical findings" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. stamp with a date, as of a postmark; "The package is dated November 24" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. To bear date; with from. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. To affix the date to; to note or fix the time of an event or transaction. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  16. To write, fix, or note the time of any event, &c.; to reckon; to begin. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  17. a participant in a date; "his date never stopped talking" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. the present; "they are up to date"; "we haven't heard from them to date" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. the specified day of the month; "what is the date today?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. a particular day specified as the time something will happen; "the date of the election is set by law" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. the particular year (usually according to the Gregorian calendar) that an event occurred; "he tried to memorizes all the dates for his history class" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. a particular but unspecified point in time; "they hoped to get together at an early date" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  23. the particular day, month, or year (usually according to the Gregorian calendar) that an event occurred; "he tried to memorizes all the dates for his history class" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  24. provide with a dateline; mark with a date; "She wrote the letter on Monday but she dated it Saturday so as not to reveal that she procrastinated" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  25. stamp with a date; "The package is dated November 24" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  26. go on a date with; "Tonight she is dating a former high school sweetheart" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  27. The fruit of the date palm; also, the date palm itself. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. That addition to a writing, inscription, coin, etc., which specifies the time (as day, month, and year) when the writing or inscription was given, or executed, or made; as, the date of a letter, of a will, of a deed, of a coin. etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. The point of time at which a transaction or event takes place, or is appointed to take place; a given point of time; epoch; as, the date of a battle. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. Assigned end; conclusion. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. Given or assigned length of life; dyration. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. The time of an event or transaction; as, July 4 is the date on which we celebrate our independence; duration; a statement which names the time of issuing of a writing, book, document, etc.; the present time: used in out of date and up to date; colloquially, an engagement for a fixed time; the edible fruit of the date palm. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  33. The time when a letter is given or written: the time of any event: a stipulated time. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  34. The fruit of the date-palm, so called from its fancied resemblance to the finger. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  35. The time of any event, fruit of the date-palm. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  36. The time of some event; a point of time. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. A sweet Oriental stone-fruit, or the tree bearing it. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. The time when an event happened or anything was done; the specification of this in a document or letter; duration; period. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. The fruit of the date-palm. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. The day, month, and year in which anything was given or executed; the time of any event or transaction; period; age; era; epoch. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  41. The fruit of the date-palm tree. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for date?

Usage examples for date

  1. We mean to tear down only that which is wrong and out of date and where we tear down we mean to build what is right and fitted to the times. – The Art of Public Speaking by Dale Carnagey (AKA Dale Carnegie) and J. Berg Esenwein
  2. But it is strong enough too; at least, it has kept me up to date – Hunger by Knut Hamsun
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