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Definitions of date

  1. a meeting arranged in advance; "she asked how to avoid kissing at the end of a date" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. date regularly; have a steady relationship with; "Did you know that she is seeing an older man?"; "He is dating his former wife again!" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. sweet edible fruit of the date palm with a single long woody seed Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a participant in a date; "his date never stopped talking" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. the present; "they are up to date"; "we haven't heard from them to date" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. the specified day of the month; "what is the date today?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a particular day specified as the time something will happen; "the date of the election is set by law" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. the particular year (usually according to the Gregorian calendar) that an event occurred; "he tried to memorizes all the dates for his history class" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a particular but unspecified point in time; "they hoped to get together at an early date" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. assign a date to; determine the (probable) date of; "Scientists often cannot date precisely archeological or prehistorical findings" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. stamp with a date, as of a postmark; "The package is dated November 24" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. the particular day, month, or year (usually according to the Gregorian calendar) that an event occurred; "he tried to memorizes all the dates for his history class" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. provide with a dateline; mark with a date; "She wrote the letter on Monday but she dated it Saturday so as not to reveal that she procrastinated" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  14. stamp with a date; "The package is dated November 24" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  15. go on a date with; "Tonight she is dating a former high school sweetheart" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  16. The fruit of the date palm; also, the date palm itself. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. That addition to a writing, inscription, coin, etc., which specifies the time (as day, month, and year) when the writing or inscription was given, or executed, or made; as, the date of a letter, of a will, of a deed, of a coin. etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. The point of time at which a transaction or event takes place, or is appointed to take place; a given point of time; epoch; as, the date of a battle. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Assigned end; conclusion. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. Given or assigned length of life; dyration. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To note the time of writing or executing; to express in an instrument the time of its execution; as, to date a letter, a bond, a deed, or a charter. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To note or fix the time of, as of an event; to give the date of; as, to date the building of the pyramids. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To have beginning; to begin; to be dated or reckoned; - with from. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. The time of an event or transaction; as, July 4 is the date on which we celebrate our independence; duration; a statement which names the time of issuing of a writing, book, document, etc.; the present time: used in out of date and up to date; colloquially, an engagement for a fixed time; the edible fruit of the date palm. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  25. To mark with a definite time; to find the definite time of. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  26. To bear the statement of a time; reckon to have existed from a given time. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. The time when a letter is given or written: the time of any event: a stipulated time. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  28. To affix the date to. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  29. To reckon: to begin. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  30. The fruit of the date-palm, so called from its fancied resemblance to the finger. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  31. The time of any event, fruit of the date-palm. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  32. To note the time of. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  33. To reckon time. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  34. To mark with a date; assign a date to. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. To bear date; with from. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. The time of some event; a point of time. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. A sweet Oriental stone-fruit, or the tree bearing it. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. The time when an event happened or anything was done; the specification of this in a document or letter; duration; period. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. The fruit of the date-palm. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. To affix the date to; to note or fix the time of an event or transaction. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  41. To reckon; to begin; to be dated. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. The day, month, and year in which anything was given or executed; the time of any event or transaction; period; age; era; epoch. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  43. To write, fix, or note the time of any event, &c.; to reckon; to begin. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  44. The fruit of the date-palm tree. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  45. the fruit of a species of palm (q.v.), the Phoenix dactilifera. This was a common tree in Palestine ( Joel 1:12 ; Nehemiah 8:15 ). Palm branches were carried by the Jews on festive occasions, and especially at the feast of Tabernacles ( Leviticus 23:40 ; Nehemiah 8:15 ). biblestudytools.com
  46. To have beginning; to begin; to be dated or reckoned; -- with from. mso.anu.edu.au
  47. The designation or indication in an instrument of writing, of the time, and usually of the time and place, when and where it was made. When the place is mentioned in the date of a deed, the law intends, unless the contrary appears, that it was executed at the place of the date. Plowd. 7 b., 31 H. VI. This word is derived from the Latin datum, because when deeds and agreements were written in that language, immediately before the day, month and year in which they were made, was set down, it was usual to put the word datum, given. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  48. All writings ought to bear a date, and in some it is indispensable in order to make them valid, as in policies of insurance; but the date in these instruments is not inserted in the body of the writing because as each subscription makes a separate contract, each underwriter sets down the day, month and year he makes his subscription. Marsh. Ins. 336. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  49. Deeds, and other writings, when the date is an impossible one, take effect from the time of deliver; the presumption of law is, that the deed was dated on the day it bears date, unless, as just mentioned, the time is impossible; for example, the 32d day of January. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  50. The proper way of dating, is to put the day, month, and year of our Lord; the hour need not be mentioned, unless specially required; an instance of which may be taken from the Pennsylvania Act of the 16th June, 1836, sect. 40, which requires the sheriff, on receiving a writ of fieri facias, or other writ of execution, to endorse thereon the day of the month, the year, and the hour of the day whereon he received the same. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  51. In public documents, it is usual to give not only the day, the month, and the year of our Lord, but also the year of the United States, when issued by authority of the general government; or of the commonwealth, when issued under its authority. Vide, generally, Bac. Ab. Obligations, C; Com. Dig, Fait, B 3; Cruise, Dig. tit, 32, c. 20, s. 1-6; 1 Burr. 60; 2 Rol. Ab. 27, 1. 22; 13 Vin. Ab. 34; Dane's Ab. lndex, h. t. See Almanac. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  52. A string unique to a time duration of 24hours between 2 successive midnights defined by the local timezone. The specific representation of a date will depend onwhich calendar convention is in force; e.g., Gregorian,Islamic, Japanese, Chinese, Hebrew etc. as well as localordering conventions such as UK: day/month/year, US:month/day/year.Inputting and outputting dates on computers is greatlycomplicated by these localisation issues which is why theytend to operate on dates internally in some unified form suchas seconds past midnight at the start of the first of January1970.Many software and hardware representations of dates allow onlytwo digits for the year, leading to the year 2000 problem.Unix manual page: date(1), ctime(3). foldoc_fs
  53. d[=a]t, n. the time of any event: a stipulated time: age, period of time.--v.t. to affix the date to.--v.t. to reckon: to begin.--adj. DATE'LESS, without date: without fixed limit: undatable.--OUT OF DATE, antiquated; UP TO DATE, adapted or corrected to the present time: modern. [O. Fr. date--L. datum, as in datum Romæ = given or written at Rome.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  54. d[=a]t, n. the fruit of the date-palm.--ns. DATE'-PALM, DATE'-TREE, the tree on which it grows, a native of the northern half of Africa and the south-west of Asia; DATE'-PLUM; DATE'-SUG'AR. [Fr. datte--L. dactylus--Gr. daktylos, a finger.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  55. The unripe date is astringent. When ripe, it resembles the fig. The juice of the tree is refrigerant. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  56. W.-Asiat. & N.-Afr. tree (also d.-palm), or its fruit, an oblong single-stoned drupe. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  57. Statement in document, letter, book, or inscription, of the time (& often place) of execution, writing, publication, &c.; time at which thing happens or is to happen; period to which antiquities &c. belong; person\'s age, duration, term of life, (archaic or poet.); (go) out of d., (become) obsolete; up to d. (f. book-keeping phr. for accounts completed to current day, now as slang adj. & adv.), meeting, according to, the latest requirements or knowledge; d.-line, meridian 180° from Greenwich, east& west of which the d. differs. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  58. Mark (letter &c.) with d. (dated from London), whence dater n.; refer (event) to a time; count time, reckon, (dating from the Creation); bear d., be dated; have origin from (church dates from the 14th c.). Hence datable a. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  59. n. [Latin] Specification of time when a writing, inscription, coin, &c., was given or executed;—precise period or time of; epoch;—duration; continuance. Cabinet Dictionary
  60. n. [Greek] The fruit of the date-palm]. Cabinet Dictionary
  61. The time at which a letter is written, marked at the end or the beginning; the time at which any event happened; the time stipulated when any thing should be done; end, conclusion; duration, continuance; the fruit of the date tree. Complete Dictionary

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