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Definitions of deacon

  1. a cleric ranking just below a priest in Roman Catholic churches Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a Protestant layman who assists the minister Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a cleric ranking just below a priest in Christian churches; one of the Holy Orders Wordnet Dictionary DB
  4. An officer in Christian churches appointed to perform certain subordinate duties varying in different communions. In the Roman Catholic and Episcopal churches, a person admitted to the lowest order in the ministry, subordinate to the bishops and priests. In Presbyterian churches, he is subordinate to the minister and elders, and has charge of certain duties connected with the communion service and the care of the poor. In Congregational churches, he is subordinate to the pastor, and has duties as in the Presbyterian church. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. The chairman of an incorporated company. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. With humorous reference to hypocritical posing: To pack (fruit or vegetables) with the finest specimens on top; to alter slyly the boundaries of (land); to adulterate or doctor (an article to be sold), etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To read aloud each line of (a psalm or hymn) before singing it, - usually with off. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. An inferior or subordinate church officer; a man appointed to assist the minister and manage the material affairs of a church. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  9. In Episcopal and Catholic churches the order of clergy under priests: in some Presbyterian churches, an officer under the elders: in Scot. the master of an incoporated company. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  10. DEACONESS. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  11. DEACONSHIP, DEACONRY. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  12. To read out, as a line of a psalm or hymn, before singing it. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  13. A subordinate grade of the clergy. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  14. A subordinate church officer. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. In the Apostolic Church, one who has charge of collecting and distributing the alms or of ministering to the poor and sick. In the English Church, a clerical person who has not taken priest's orders. In the Presbyterian Church, one who superintends the financial and secular affairs of a congregation. In the Congregational Church, one who admits to membership and assists at the communion. In Scotland, the master of an incorporated company of craftsmen. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  16. In the Eng. Ch. and in the Ch. of R., a person in the lowest order of the clergy-originally an overseer of the poor, but deacons do not now fulfil their original purpose; in Scot., the chairman of an incorporated trade; in certain denominations, one who attends to the secular affairs of the congregation. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  17. The office described by this title appears in the New Testament as the correlative of bishop. [BISHOP] The two are mentioned together in ( Philemon 1:1 ; 1 Timothy 3:2 1 Timothy 3:8 ) Its original meaning implied a helper, an assistant. The bishops were the "elders," the deacons the young active men, of the church. The narrative of Acts 6 is commonly referred to as giving an account of the institution of this office. The apostles, in order to meet the complaints of the Hellenistic Jews that their widows were neglected in the daily ministration, call on the body of believers to choose seven men "full of the Holy Ghost and of wisdom," whom they "may appoint over this business." It may be questioned, however, whether the seven were not appointed to higher functions than those of the deacons of the New Testament. Qualifications and duties. Special directions as to the qualifications for and the duties of deacons will be found in Acts 6 and ( 1 Timothy 3:8-12 ) From the analogy of the synagogue, and from the scanty notices in the New Testament, we may think of the deacons or "young men" at Jerusalem as preparing the rooms for meetings, distributing alms, maintaining order at the meetings, baptizing new converts, distributing the elements at the Lords Supper. biblestudytools.com
  18. Anglicized form of the Greek word diaconos, meaning a "runner," "messenger," "servant." For a long period a feeling of mutual jealousy had existed between the "Hebrews," or Jews proper, who spoke the sacred language of palestine, and the "Hellenists," or Jews of the Grecian speech, who had adopted the Grecian language, and read the Septuagint version of the Bible instead of the Hebrew. This jealousy early appeared in the Christian community. It was alleged by the Hellenists that their widows were overlooked in the daily distribution of alms. This spirit must be checked. The apostles accordingly advised the disciples to look out for seven men of good report, full of the Holy Ghost, and men of practical wisdom, who should take entire charge of this distribution, leaving them free to devote themselves entirely to the spiritual functions of their office ( Acts 6:1-6 ). This was accordingly done. Seven men were chosen, who appear from their names to have been Hellenists. The name "deacon" is nowhere applied to them in the New Testament; they are simply called "the seven" ( 21:8 ). Their office was at first secular, but it afterwards became also spiritual; for among other qualifications they must also be "apt to teach" ( 1 Timothy 3: : 812 -12). Both Philip and Stephen, who were of "the seven," preached; they did "the work of evangelists." biblestudytools.com
  19. To read aloud each line of a psalm or hymn before singing it, -- usually with off. mso.anu.edu.au
  20. In ecclesiastical law. A minister or servant in the church, whose office is to assist the priest In divine service and the distribution of the sacrament. It is the lowest order in the Church of England. thelawdictionary.org
  21. Direct English Access and CONtrol. English-like query system.Sammet 1969, p.668. foldoc_fs
  22. To read aloud each line of (a psalm or hymn) before singing it, usually with off. dictgcide_fs
  23. d[=e]'kn, n. in Episcopal churches, a member of the order of clergy under priests: in some Presbyterian churches, an officer, distinct from the elders, who attends to the secular affairs of the church: in Congregational and some other churches, an officer who advises the pastor, distributes the elements at the Communion, and dispenses charity: in Scotland, the master of an incorporated company:--fem. DEA'CONESS, a female servant of the Christian society in the time of the apostles: in a convent, a nun who has the care of the altar: one of an order of women in some Protestant churches who nurse the sick and tend the poor.--ns. DEA'CONHOOD, DEA'CONRY, DEA'CONSHIP. [L. diaconus--Gr. diakonos, a servant.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  24. (Primitive Church) appointed minister of charity (Acts vi, 1-6); (Episcopal) member of third order of ministry below bishop& priest; (Presbyterian) officer attending to congregation\'s secular affairs. Hence deaconship n. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  25. n. [Latin] Originally one appointed to serve tables, or superintend the care of the poor;—in the Romish church, an assistant to the priest;—in the English church, one licensed to preach, but not to administer sealing ordinances;—in Presbyterian churches, one charged with the care and distribution of Church Property and Funds. Cabinet Dictionary
  26. One of the lowest order of the clergy. Complete Dictionary

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