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Definitions of dead

  1. quickly and without warning; "he stopped suddenly" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. completely and without qualification; used informally as intensifiers; "an absolutely magnificent painting"; "a perfectly idiotic idea"; "you're perfectly right"; "utterly miserable"; "you can be dead sure of my innocence"; "was dead tired"; "dead right" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. (informal) very tired; "was all in at the end of the day"; "so beat I could flop down and go to sleep anywhere"; "bushed after all that exercise"; "I'm dead after that long trip" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. devoid of physical sensation; numb; "his gums were dead from the novocain"; "she felt no discomfort as the dentist drilled her deadened tooth"; "a public desensitized by continuous television coverage of atrocities" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. people who are no longer living; "they buried the dead" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a time when coldness (or some other quality associated with death) is intense; "the dead of winter" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. devoid of activity; "this is a dead town; nothing ever happens here" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. physically inactive; "Crater Lake is in the crater of a dead volcano of the Cascade Range" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. no longer having or seeming to have or expecting to have life; "the nerve is dead"; "a dead pallor"; "he was marked as a dead man by the assassin" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. not showing characteristics of life especially the capacity to sustain life; no longer exerting force or having energy or heat; "Mars is a dead planet"; "a dead battery"; "dead soil"; "dead coals"; "the fire is dead" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. not endowed with life; "the inorganic world is inanimate"; "inanimate objects"; "dead stones" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. drained of electric charge; discharged; "a dead battery"; "left the lights on and came back to find the battery drained" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. no longer in force or use; inactive; "a defunct (or dead) law"; "a defunct organization" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. not circulating or flowing; "dead air"; "dead water"; "stagnant water" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. total; "dead silence"; "utter seriousness" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. sudden and complete; "came to a dead stop" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. (followed by `to') not showing human feeling or sensitivity; unresponsive; "passersby were dead to our plea for help"; "numb to the cries for mercy" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. not yielding a return; "dead capital"; "idle funds" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. lacking animation or excitement or activity; "the party being dead we left early"; "it was a lifeless party until she arrived" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. no longer having force or relevance; "a dead issue" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  21. lacking resilience or bounce; "a dead tennis ball" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  22. not surviving in active use; "Latin is a dead language" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  23. out of use or operation because of a fault or breakdown; "a dead telephone line"; "the motor is dead" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  24. unerringly accurate; "a dead shot"; "took dead aim" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  25. lacking acoustic resonance; "dead sounds characteristic of some compact discs"; "the dead wall surfaces of a recording studio" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  26. very tired; "was all in at the end of the day"; "so beat I could flop down and go to sleep anywhere"; "bushed after all that exercise"; "I'm dead after that long trip" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  27. Destitute of life; inanimate; as, dead matter. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. Resembling death in appearance or quality; without show of life; deathlike; as, a dead sleep. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. Still as death; motionless; inactive; useless; as, dead calm; a dead load or weight. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. So constructed as not to transmit sound; soundless; as, a dead floor. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. Unproductive; bringing no gain; unprofitable; as, dead capital; dead stock in trade. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. Lacking spirit; dull; lusterless; cheerless; as, dead eye; dead fire; dead color, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. Monotonous or unvaried; as, a dead level or pain; a dead wall. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. Sure as death; unerring; fixed; complete; as, a dead shot; a dead certainty. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. Bringing death; deadly. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  36. Wanting in religious spirit and vitality; as, dead faith; dead works. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. Not brilliant; not rich; thus, brown is a dead color, as compared with crimson. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. Cut off from the rights of a citizen; deprived of the power of enjoying the rights of property; as, one banished or becoming a monk is civilly dead. Webster Dictionary DB
  39. Not imparting motion or power; as, the dead spindle of a lathe, etc. See Spindle. Webster Dictionary DB
  40. To a degree resembling death; to the last degree; completely; wholly. Webster Dictionary DB
  41. The most quiet or deathlike time; the period of profoundest repose, inertness, or gloom; as, the dead of winter. Webster Dictionary DB
  42. To make dead; to deaden; to deprive of life, force, or vigor. Webster Dictionary DB
  43. To die; to lose life or force. Webster Dictionary DB
  44. Thoroughly. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  45. Deprived of life; - opposed to alive and living; reduced to that state of a being in which the organs of motion and life have irrevocably ceased to perform their functions; as, a dead tree; a dead man. Webster Dictionary DB
  46. Flat; without gloss; - said of painting which has been applied purposely to have this effect. Webster Dictionary DB
  47. One who is dead; - commonly used collectively. Webster Dictionary DB
  48. Carrying no current, or producing no useful effect; - said of a conductor in a dynamo or motor, also of a telegraph wire which has no instrument attached and, therefore, is not in use. Webster Dictionary DB
  49. Out of play; regarded as out of the game; - said of a ball, a piece, or a player under certain conditions in cricket, baseball, checkers, and some other games. Webster Dictionary DB
  50. Having ceased to live without life; inanimate; resembling death; inactive; disused; complete; as, a dead loss; sure as death; as, a dead shot; out of the game or play. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  51. One or many dead persons: used after the; the point or degree of greatest lifelessness; as, the dead of night. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  52. Absolutely; exactly; as, he was dead wrong. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  53. 1. Without life. 2. Numb. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  54. Deprived of life: that never had life: deathlike: useless: dull: cold and cheerless: without vegetation: perfect. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  55. The time of greatest stillness. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  56. Those who are dead. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  57. Time of greatest silence. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  58. Without life; dull; still. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  59. Lifeless; insensible; numb; motionless; inanimate; dull. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  60. Complete; utter; absolute. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  61. Unproductive; useless. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  62. The most lifeless period, as of night. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  63. Dead persons collectively. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  64. Having ceased to live; without life; death like; still or motionless as death; blank; sure as death; useless; unprofitable; unreal; dull; tasteiess; vapid; deep; not acting; spiritless; without spiritual life, or the principle of Christian life; cut off from the rights of a citizen; not glossy; not gay or bright. The dead, dead men. Dead language, a language which is no longer spoken, and known only in writings, as the Hebrew, Greek, and Latin. Dead-lock, a complete standstill from complication. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  65. The time when things are most still or dead; those dead. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  66. Deprived of life; deceased; without life; that never had life; senseless; inactive; perfectly still; tasteless; vapid; perfect or complete, as a dead shot; wholly under the power of sin. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  67. Deprived of life; -- opposed to alive and living; reduced to that state of a being in which the organs of motion and life have irrevocably ceased to perform their functions; as, a dead tree; a dead man. mso.anu.edu.au
  68. Flat; without gloss; -- said of painting which has been applied purposely to have this effect. mso.anu.edu.au
  69. One who is dead; -- commonly used collectively. mso.anu.edu.au
  70. 1. Non-functional; down; crashed. Especially used ofhardware.2. At XEROX PARC, software that is working but notundergoing continued development and support. foldoc_fs
  71. ded, adj. without life: death-like: at rest, of a ball: cold and cheerless: without vegetation: utter: unerring.--v.t. to deaden, dull.--adv. in a dead manner.--n. the time of greatest stillness, as 'the dead of night.'--adjs. DEAD'-ALIVE', DEAD'-AND-ALIVE', dull, uneventful; DEAD'-BEAT, quite overcome; DEAD'-BORN, still-born.--n.pl. DEAD'-CLOTHES, clothes in which to bury the dead.--n. DEAD'-COL'OURING, the first broad outlines of a picture.--adjs. DEAD'-DO'ING (Spens.), putting to death, destructive; DEAD'-DRUNK, completely drunk.--v.t. DEAD'EN, to make dead: to deprive partly of vigour or sensation: to blunt: to lessen.--ns. DEAD'-EYE, (naut.), a round, flattish wooden block with a rope or iron band passing round it, and pierced with three holes for a lanyard; DEAD'-FALL, a trap operated by a weight that, when its support is removed, falls upon and kills or holds an animal; DEAD'-FREIGHT, money paid for the empty space in a ship by a person who engages to freight her, but fails to make out a full cargo; DEAD'-HEAD (U.S.), one who is allowed, without payment, to ride in a public carriage, sit in a theatre, or hold a privilege having a money value; DEAD'-HEAT, a heat or race in which no one gains the advantage; DEAD'-HOUSE, the house or room where (in hospitals, police-offices, &c.) dead bodies are kept till buried: a mortuary; DEAD'-LETT'ER, a letter undelivered and unclaimed at the post-office: a law or ordinance which has been made but never enforced; DEAD'-LEV'EL, a stretch of land without any rising ground: sameness; DEAD'-LIFT, a lift made without help, leverage, &c.; hence an effort under discouraging conditions.--n.pl. DEAD'-LIGHTS, storm-shutters for a cabin window.--ns. DEAD'LINESS; DEAD'-LOCK, the case when matters have become so complicated that all is at a complete standstill.--adj. DEAD'LY, causing death: fatal: implacable.--adv. in a manner resembling death.--ns. DEAD'LY-NIGHT'SHADE, the plant Belladonna (q.v.); DEAD'-MARCH, a piece of solemn music played at funeral processions, esp. of soldiers; DEAD'-MEAT, the flesh of animals ready for the market.--n.pl. DEAD'-MEN, empty bottles after a carouse.--ns. DEAD'NESS; DEAD'-NETT'LE, a genus of plants of the natural order Labiatæ, so called because they resemble nettles but do not sting; DEAD'-PAY, continued pay dishonestly drawn for men actually dead; DEAD'-RECK'ONING, an estimation of a ship's place simply by the log-book; DEAD'-ROPE, a rope not running in any block; DEAD'-SET, a determined and prolonged attempt; DEAD'-SHOT, an unerring marksman.--adj. DEAD'-STROKE, without recoil.--ns. DEAD'-WALL, a wall unbroken by windows or other openings; DEAD'-WA'TER, the eddy water closing in behind a ship's stern as she sails; DEAD'-WEIGHT, a heavy or oppressive burden; DEAD'-WIND, a wind coming directly ahead or opposed to a ship's course; DEAD'-WOOD, pieces of timber laid on the upper side of the keel at either end, useless material; DEAD'-WORK, work, itself unprofitable, which is necessary as a preliminary, as the opening of a mine.--DEAD AS A DOOR-NAIL, absolutely dead; DEAD LANGUAGE, one no longer spoken; DEAD-MEN'S BELLS, the foxglove; DEAD-MEN'S FINGERS, a very common coelenterate belonging to the Actinozoa--also Cow-paps and Mermaid's glove; DEAD-MEN'S SHOES, a situation formerly held by some one now dead; DEAD'S PART (Scots law), the part of a man's movable property which he may bequeath by will, and which is not due to wife and children.--BE DEAD SET AGAINST, to be utterly opposed to.--PUT THE DEAD WOOD ON (U.S. slang), to gain a great advantage over. [A.S. deád; Goth. dauths, Ger. todt, from root of die.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  72. (Sax.) Mortuus, (F.) Mort. Deprived of life, exanimate. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  73. That has ceased to live (the d., noun, d. person or persons, or all who have ever died; from the d., from among these; d.-house, mortuary; d.-march, funeral music; d. office, funeral service; d. as a doornail, quite d.; d. & gone; wait for d. men\'s SHOES; FLOG d. horse; d. men, empty bottles; d. man\'s finger, hand, thumb, kinds of orchid); benumbed, insensible, (of hands &c.; also d. to, unconscious or unappreciative of, hardened against); without spiritual life; obsolete, past, not effective, (d. language, e.g. ancient Greek; d. letter, law no longer observed, unclaimed or undeliverable letter at post office); inanimate (d. fence, of timber &c. opp. quickset; d. matter); extinct, dull, lustreless, without force, muffled, (d. brand, coal; d. gold, unburnished; d. colour, first layer in picture, cold& pale; d.-nettle, non-stinging weed like nettle; d.-alive, spiritless; d. sound, not resonant); inactive, motionless, idle, (D. Sea; d. point or d. centre, least& greatest extension of piston or crank, where it exerts no effective power; d. weight, inert, of lifeless matter, also fig. of debt &c.; d. pull, lift, at thing too heavy for one to move; d. freight, sum paid in chartering ship for part not occupied by cargo; d. arch, window, &c., sham; d. hours, still, in night; d. season; d. stock, unemployed capital, unsalable goods; d. ball, out of play; wind falls d.; as noun, =d. time, at d. of night, in the d. of winter); abrupt, complete, unrelieved, exact, (come to d. stop; a d. faint; on a d. level; d. heat, exact equality in race; a d. calm; d. loss, without compensation; be in d. earnest; a d. certainty; d. on the target, quite straight, so d. shot, unerring; d.-lock, utter standstill); d.-eye (naut.), round flat three-holed block for extending shrouds; d.-fire, St Elmo\'s fire. as presaging death; d.-head, non-paying theatre-goer or passenger; d.-light (naut.), shutter protecting cabin-window or porthole in storm; d.-reckoning (naut.), of ship\'s position by log. compass, &c., when observations are impossible; D.-Sea APPLE; hence deadness n. (Adv.) profoundly, absolutely, completely, (d. asleep, tired, drunk; d-beat, tired out; CUT d.; d. against, directly opposite to). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  74. d. men tell no tales (argument for killing person who otherwise might tell tales); d. end, terminus of branch line of railway &c.; d.-hand, = MORTMAIN (usu. implying protest); d. man (or men)\'s fingers, finger-like divisions of gills in lobster or crab. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  75. Destitute of life, properly speaking, after having once . possessed it. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  76. Figuratively, paralyzed, especially as to sensation; said of a part as in the expression d. fingers. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  77. Dull in appearance. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  78. n. The state of the dead; the most quiet or death-like time; the period of profoundest repose, inertness, or gloom;—pl. Those who are dead; the deceased; the departed. Cabinet Dictionary
  79. Deprived of life; inanimate; senseless; motionless; empty; useless; dull, gloomy; frigid; vapid; spiritless; uninhabited; without the power of vegetation; in theology, lying under the power of sin. Complete Dictionary

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