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Definitions of debauch

  1. a wild gathering involving excessive drinking and promiscuity Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. corrupt morally or by intemperance or sensuality; "debauch the young people with wine and women"; "Socrates was accused of corrupting young men"; "Do school counselors subvert young children?"; "corrupt the morals" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. To lead away from purity or excellence; to corrupt in character or principles; to mar; to vitiate; to pollute; to seduce; as, to debauch one's self by intemperance; to debauch a woman; to debauch an army. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. Excess in eating or drinking; intemperance; drunkenness; lewdness; debauchery. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. An act or occasion of debauchery. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To corrupt in morals or principles; pollute; vitiate. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  7. Excess in eating and drinking; a carouse. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8. Debauched. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  9. To lead away from duty or allegiance: to corrupt with lewdness. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  10. To indulge in revelry. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  11. A fit of intemperance or debauchery. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  12. A fit of drunkenness or lewdness. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  13. To lead from virtue or duty; corrupt. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  14. To make or become corrupt in morals; lead astray; seduce; pervent. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. An act or occasion of debauchery; a carouse. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  16. Excess in eating or drinking: intemperance; lewdness. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  17. To corrupt; to vitiate. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  18. To entice, to corrupt, and, when used of a woman, to seduce. Originally, the term had a limited signification, meaning to entice or draw one away from his work, employment, or duty; and from this sense its application has enlarged to include the corruption of manners and violation of the person. In its modern legal sense, the word carries with it the idea of "carnal knowledge," aggravated by assault, violent seduction, ravishment. Ivoenig v. Nott, 2 Iiilt. (X. Y.) 323. And see Wood v. Mathews, 47 Iowa, 410; State v. Curran, 51 Iowa, 112, 49 N. W. 1006. thelawdictionary.org
  19. de-bawch', v.t. to lead away from duty or allegiance: to corrupt with lewdness: to pervert.--v.i. to indulge in revelry.--n. a fit of intemperance or debauchery.--p.adj. DEBAUCHED', corrupt: profligate.--adv. DEBAUCH'EDLY.--ns. DEBAUCH'EDNESS; DEB'AUCHEE, a libertine; DEBAUCH'ER; DEBAUCH'ERY, excessive intemperance: habitual lewdness; DEBAUCH'MENT. [O. Fr. desbaucher (Fr. débaucher), to corrupt--des = L. dis, and baucher, to hew--bauche or bauc, a beam, a course of stones.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  20. Pervert from virtue or morality; make intemperate or sensual; seduce (woman); vitiate (taste, judgment); hence debauchable a. (N.) bout or habit of sensual indulgence; hence debauchery n. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  21. n. Excess in eating or drinking; intemperance; lewdness;—a drinking match; carousal. Cabinet Dictionary
  22. A fit of intemperance, lewdness. Complete Dictionary

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