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Definitions of decompose

  1. To separate into constituent parts; decay; putrefy. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  2. To separate the constituent parts of; to resolve into original elements; to set free from previously existing forms of chemical combination; to bring to dissolution; to rot or decay. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To separate into elementary parts; cause to decay or rot. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  4. To become resolved or returned from existing combinations; to undergo dissolution; to decay; to rot. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To become separated into parts; to rot. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  6. separate into constituent elements or parts, as of chemical substances Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. break down; "The bodies decomposed in the heat" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. separate (substances) into constituent elements or parts Wordnet Dictionary DB
  9. To resolve or separate into elements. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  10. To separate the constituent parts of a body or substance; to resolve into original elements. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  11. To separate the constituent parts of a body; to rot or decay; to resolve into original elements. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

What are the misspellings for decompose?

Usage examples for decompose

  1. 4. Bones of the bear, among which were observed the paws and the head, only half flayed, of a bear which had been shot so recently that the flesh had not begun to decompose alongside of this bear's head there were found two lead bullets placed on a stone. – The Voyage of the Vega round Asia and Europe, Volume I and Volume II by A.E. Nordenskieold
  2. Its great affinity for oxygen causes it to decompose water with evolution of hydrogen, which takes fire with the heat produced. – The Chemical History Of A Candle by Michael Faraday
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