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Definitions of degree

  1. an award conferred by a college or university signifying that the recipient has satisfactorily completed a course of study; "he earned his degree at Princeton summa cum laude" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a measure for arcs and angles; "there are 360 degrees in a circle" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a specific identifiable position in a continuum or series or especially in a process; "a remarkable degree of frankness"; "at what stage are the social sciences?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a position on a scale of intensity or amount or quality; "a moderate degree of intelligence"; "a high level of care is required"; "it is all a matter of degree" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. the seriousness of something (e.g., a burn or crime); "murder in the second degree"; "a second degree burn" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. the highest power of a term or variable Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a unit of temperature on a specified scale; "the game was played in spite of the 40-degree temperature" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. A step, stair, or staircase. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. One of a series of progressive steps upward or downward, in quality, rank, acquirement, and the like; a stage in progression; grade; gradation; as, degrees of vice and virtue; to advance by slow degrees; degree of comparison. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. The point or step of progression to which a person has arrived; rank or station in life; position. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. Measure of advancement; quality; extent; as, tastes differ in kind as well as in degree. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Grade or rank to which scholars are admitted by a college or university, in recognition of their attainments; as, the degree of bachelor of arts, master, doctor, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. A certain distance or remove in the line of descent, determining the proximity of blood; one remove in the chain of relationship; as, a relation in the third or fourth degree. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Three figures taken together in numeration; thus, 140 is one degree, 222,140 two degrees. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. State as indicated by sum of exponents; more particularly, the degree of a term is indicated by the sum of the exponents of its literal factors; thus, a2b3c is a term of the sixth degree. The degree of a power, or radical, is denoted by its index, that of an equation by the greatest sum of the exponents of the unknown quantities in any term; thus, ax4 + bx2 = c, and mx2y2 + nyx = p, are both equations of the fourth degree. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. A 360th part of the circumference of a circle, which part is taken as the principal unit of measure for arcs and angles. The degree is divided into 60 minutes and the minute into 60 seconds. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. A division, space, or interval, marked on a mathematical or other instrument, as on a thermometer. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A line or space of the staff. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A step or grade; rank or station in life; a stage in progress; a remove in relationship; academical rank conferred by an institution; as, a doctor's degree; one of three grades in the comparison of an adjective or adverb; a relative amount, extent, quality, etc.; the 360th part of the circumference of a circle; sixty geographical miles; a unit for measuring heat, cold, etc. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. 1. A rank conferred by colleges and universities in recognition of the completion of a certain course of study or as a mark of honor. The most common medical degrees are Chirurgiae Magister (C.M.), master in surgery; Medicinae Bachelor (M.B.), bachelor of medicine; Medicinae Doctor (M.D.), doctor of medicine. 2. One of the divisions on the scale of a thermometer, barometer, etc. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  21. Step; position; rank; extent; 360th part of a circle. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  22. One of a series of steps; grade; rank; station; amount; intensity. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. One of the three forms in which an adjective or an adverb is compared; as, the positive, comparative, and superlative degrees. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  24. An honorary title. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. A step or grade in progression, in elevation, quality, dignity, or rank; relative position or rank; a certain distance or remove in the line of descent determining the proximity of blood; measure; extent; the 360th part of the circumference of a circle; a division, space, or interval marked on a mathematical or other instrument; a term applied to equations to denote the highest power of the unknown quantity; a mark of distinction conferred by universities after examination, or in honour. Honorary degrees, those of doctor of divinity, doctor of laws, &c. By degrees, step by step; gradually. To a degree, exceedingly. See Degrade. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  26. A portion of space taken as a unit of measure, as a degree of latitude; the 360th part of the circumference of a circle; a division on a mathematical or other instrument; a stage in progression; rank or station in society; relationship in blood; measure or extent; an interval of sound; rank or title conferred by a university: by degrees, step by step; gradually. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  27. The degree (or valency) of a node in a graph is the number ofedges joined to it. foldoc_fs
  28. Grade or rank to which scholars are admitted by a college or university, in recognition of their attainments; also, (informal) the diploma provided by an educational institution attesting to the achievement of that rank; as, the degree of bachelor of arts, master, doctor, etc.; to hang one's degrees on the office wall. dictgcide_fs
  29. de-gr[=e]', n. a grade or step: one of a series of advances: relative position: rank: extent: a mark of distinction conferred by universities, whether earned by examination or granted as a mark of honour: the 360th part of a circle: 60 geographical miles: nearness of relationship: comparative amount of guilt: one of the three stages (positive, comparative, superlative) in the comparison of an adjective or an adverb.--BY DEGREES, by little and little, gradually; FORBIDDEN DEGREES, the degrees of consanguinity and affinity within which it is not permitted to marry; SONGS OF DEGREES, or Songs of ascents, Psalms cxx.-cxxxiv., either because sung by the Jews returning from captivity, or by the Jews coming up annually to attend the feasts at Jerusalem; TO A DEGREE, to a great degree, to an extreme. [Fr. degré--L. de, gradus, a step.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  30. from degre, originally from gradua, 'a step.' A title conferred by a college, -as the 'degree of Doctor of Medicine.' Galen used this expression to indicate the qualities of certain drugs. Both he and his school admitted cold, warm, moist, and dry medicines, and four different 'degrees' of each of those qualities. Thus, Apium was warm in the first degree, Agrimony in the second, Roche Alum in the third, and Garlic in the fourth. Bedegar was cold in the first, the flower of the Pomegranate in the second, the Sempervivum in the third, Opium in the fourth, &c. The French use the term degre to indicate, 1. The intensity of an affection: as a burn of the first, second, third degree, &c. 2. The particular stage of an incurable disease, as the third degree of phthisis, cancer of the stomach, &c. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  31. Step (as) of staircase (archaic; perh. so in 2 Kings xx. 9, & in Psalm-title Song of Dd.); thing placed like step in series, tier, row; stage in ascending or descending scale or process (by dd., gradually); step in direct genealogical descent (prohibited dd., number of these too low to allow of marriage, i. e. first, second, & third, reckoning from one party up to common ancestor& down to the other); social or official rank; relative condition (each good in its d.); stage in intensity or amount (to a high or the last d., also colloq. in latter sense to a d.; in law, principal in the first, second, d.); academic rank conferred as guarantee of proficiency, or (honorary d.) on distinguished person; masonic rank; (Gram.) stage (POSITIVE, COMPARATIVE, SUPERLATIVE) in comparison of adjj. & advv.; (Geom. &c.) unit of angular or circular-arc measurement, 1/90 of right angle or 1/360 of circumference (symbol°, as 45°); (Therm.) unit of temperature in any scale. Hence degreeless a. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  32. (often quoted as small) by dd. & beautifully less (Prior, Henry& Emma, 431; often facet. in meaningless applications). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  33. One of the equal parts into which a circle or a scale, as of a thermometer, is divided Appleton's medical dictionary.
  34. [L.L., a step, degree] The 360th part of the circumference of a circle. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  35. The angle subtended at the centre by that part. If two stations are taken on the same meridian such that the directions of the plumb-lines at them, when produced, contain an angle of 1, they are said to be a D. of latitude apart ; the length of the arc of the meridian between them is a D. of the meridian ; the length of a degree of the meridian is greater near the poles than near the equator. The D. of an equation is the highest power of the unknown quantity, e.g. x3 - 7x + 6 = 0 is an equation of the third degree. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  36. n. [French] A step; an advance in space or time; a step upward or downward, in quality, rank, acquirement, and the like;—point to which a person has arrived; position; station; measure of advancement; extent;—grade or rank to which students or professional men are admitted in recognition of their attainments by a college or university;—a certain distance or remove in the line of descent determining the proximity of blood;—a 360th part of the circumference of a circle;—a space, or interval, marked as on a thermometer or barometer;—difference in elevation between two musical notes. Cabinet Dictionary
  37. Quality, rank, station; the state and condition in which a thing is; a step or preparation to any thing; order of lineage, descent of family; measure, proportion; in geometry, the three hundred and sixtieth part of the circumference of a circle; in musick, the intervals of sounds. Complete Dictionary

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