Spellcheck.net

Definitions of deplore

  1. To complain of. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. To regard as hopeless; to give up. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To lament; grieve for; as, to deplore a loss. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  4. To feel or express deep grief for: to lament. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  5. To lament; regret greatly. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  6. To regret; lament. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  7. express strong disapproval of; "We deplore the government's treatment of political prisoners" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. regret strongly; "I deplore this hostile action"; "we lamented the loss of benefits" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  9. To feel deep grief or sorrow over; to grieve over. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  10. To lament; to mourn; to bewail; to express' or feel deep grief for. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  11. Deplorably. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  12. DEPLORINGLY. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.

What are the misspellings for deplore?

Usage examples for deplore

  1. I have called home their exiles, I have liberated their prisoners, I have restored their property to those who were proscribed, and have compelled them to live in peace; but such is the restless rage of these Galileans that they deplore their inability any longer to devour one another." – A Philosophical Dictionary, Volume 7 (of 10) From "The Works of Voltaire - A Contemporary Version" by François-Marie Arouet (AKA Voltaire) Commentator: John Morley Tobias Smollett H.G. Leigh
  2. When I speak of Princes whose talents are known not to be brilliant, whose intellects are known to be feeble, and whose good intentions are rendered null by a want of firmness of character or consistency of conduct; while I deplore their weakness and the consequent misfortunes of their contemporaries, I lay all the blame on their wicked or ignorant counsellors; because, if no Ministers were fools or traitors, no Sovereigns would tremble on their thrones, and no subjects dare to shake their foundation. – The Project Gutenberg Memoirs of Napoleon Bonaparte by Bourrienne, Constant, and Stewarton
X