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Definitions of depress

  1. lower someone's spirits; make downhearted; "These news depressed her"; "The bad state of her child's health demoralizes her" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. lower (prices or markets); "The glut of oil depressed gas prices" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. lessen the activity or force of; "The rising inflation depressed the economy" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. press down; "Depress the space key" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. cause to drop or sink; "The lack of rain had depressed the water level in the reservoir" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. To press down; to cause to sink; to let fall; to lower; as, to depress the muzzle of a gun; to depress the eyes. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To bring down or humble; to abase, as pride. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To cast a gloom upon; to sadden; as, his spirits were depressed. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To lessen the activity of; to make dull; embarrass, as trade, commerce, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To lessen in price; to cause to decline in value; to cheapen; to depreciate. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To reduce (an equation) in a lower degree. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Having the middle lower than the border; concave. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To press or thrust down; sadden; lower or cheapen; make dull, as trade. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  14. Depressor. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. To humble. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  16. To press down: to let down: to lower: to humble: to dispirit or cast a gloom over. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  17. DEPRESSINGLY. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  18. To press down; lower; cast down. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  19. To press down; lower. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  20. To dispirit; sadden. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  21. To press down; to lower; to render dull or languid; to sink in altitude; to impoverish; to lower in value; to humble; to cast down or dispirit. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  22. To push down to a lower state or position; to lower; to render languid or dull; to deject or make sad; to lower in value. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  23. de-pres', v.t. to press down: to let down: to lower: to humble: to make subject: to dispirit or cast a gloom over.--n. DEPRES'SANT (med.), a sedative.--p.adj. DEPRESSED', pressed down: lowered: humbled: dejected: dispirited.--adj. DEPRES'SING, able or tending to depress.--adv. DEPRES'SINGLY.--ns. DEPRES'SION, a falling in or sinking: a lowering: a fall of the barometer: a hollow: abasement: dejection; DEPRES'SOR, an oppressor: a muscle that draws down: a surgical instrument for squeezing down a soft part. [L. deprim[)e]re, -pressum--de, down, and prim[)e]re, to press.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  24. Push or pull down, lower; bring low, humble; reduce activity of (esp. trade); lower (voice) in pitch; dispirit, deject. So depressible a. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary

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