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Definitions of depress

  1. To press down; to cause to sink; to let fall; to lower; as, to depress the muzzle of a gun; to depress the eyes. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. To cast a gloom upon; to sadden; as, his spirits were depressed. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To lessen the activity of; to make dull; embarrass, as trade, commerce, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To lessen in price; to cause to decline in value; to cheapen; to depreciate. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To reduce (an equation) in a lower degree. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To press or thrust down; sadden; lower or cheapen; make dull, as trade. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  7. To press down; lower; cast down. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  8. To press down; lower. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  9. To dispirit; sadden. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  10. lower someone's spirits; make downhearted; "These news depressed her"; "The bad state of her child's health demoralizes her" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. lessen the activity or force of; "The rising inflation depressed the economy" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. press down; "Depress the space key" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. To press down; to lower; to render dull or languid; to sink in altitude; to impoverish; to lower in value; to humble; to cast down or dispirit. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  14. To push down to a lower state or position; to lower; to render languid or dull; to deject or make sad; to lower in value. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  15. Depressor. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  16. DEPRESSINGLY. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  17. Having the middle lower than the border; concave. Webster Dictionary DB

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Usage examples for depress

  1. From a distance all the houses produce an effect of black trimmed with strips of linen, and present an appearance partly festal, partly funereal, leaving one in doubt whether they enliven or depress – Holland, v. 1 (of 2) by Edmondo de Amicis
  2. The prospect of such a world of idiots ought to depress us, but . – Gilbert Keith Chesterton by Maisie Ward
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