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Definitions of despite

  1. lack of respect accompanied by a feeling of intense dislike; "he was held in contempt"; "the despite in which outsiders were held is legendary" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. contemptuous disregard; "she wanted neither favor nor despite" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. Malice; malignity; spite; malicious anger; contemptuous hate. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. An act of malice, hatred, or defiance; contemptuous defiance; a deed of contempt. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To vex; to annoy; to offend contemptuously. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. In spite of; against, or in defiance of; notwithstanding; as, despite his prejudices. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. Extreme contempt; malicious anger; scorn; hatred. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8. Notwithstanding. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  9. A looking down upon with contempt: violent malice or hatred. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  10. In spite of: notwithstanding. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  11. Contempt; malice. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  12. Extreme a version; spite; disdain with defiance. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  13. In spite of; notwithstanding. See Despise. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  14. Extreme malice; defiance with contempt; an act of malice or contempt. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  15. To vex, offend, or tease. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  16. Violent hatred; extreme malice; defiance of opposition or difficulties, or in contempt of them. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  17. To tease; to offend; to vex. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  18. de-sp[=i]t', n. a looking down upon with contempt: violent malice or hatred.--prep. in spite of: notwithstanding.--adj. DESPITE'FUL.--adv. DESPITE'FULLY.--n. DESPITE'FULNESS.--adj. DESPIT'EOUS (Spens.). [O. Fr. despit (mod. dépit)--L. despectus--despic[)e]re.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  19. Outrage, injury, contumely, (archaic); malice, spite, offended pride (died of mere d.); in d. of, d. of, d., notwithstanding the opposition of, in the teeth of, in spite of, (also in my &c. d., in spite of my &c. efforts, archaic). Hence despiteful a., despitefully adv. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  20. n. [French] Extreme malice; malignity; angry hatred;—an act prompted by malice or hatred; act of defiance. Cabinet Dictionary
  21. Malice, anger, defiance; act of malice. Complete Dictionary

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