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Definitions of dew

  1. water that has condensed on a cool surface overnight from water vapor in the air; "in the morning the grass was wet with dew" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. Moisture from the atmosphere condensed by cool bodies upon their surfaces, particularly at night. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. Figuratively, anything which falls lightly and in a refreshing manner. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. An emblem of morning, or fresh vigor. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To wet with dew or as with dew; to bedew; to moisten; as with dew. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. Same as Due, or Duty. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. Moisture from the atmosphere deposited in small drops; that which fails lightly and in a refreshing manner. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8. Moisture deposited from the air in minute specks upon the surface of objects. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  9. To wet with dew: to moisten. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  10. DEWDROP. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  11. Moisture deposited from the air in cooling. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  12. To wet with or as with dew; bedew. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  13. Moisture condensed from the atmosphere in small drops upon the upper surface of plants, etc. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. Moisture precipitated from the atmosphere on the surface of bodies, such as in a clear sky falls lightly at night. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  15. The moisture deposited on the surface of the ground from the air in the evening, due to the more rapid cooling of the earth's surface. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  16. To wet as with dew; to moisten. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  17. This in the summer is so copious in Palestine that it supplies to some extent the absence of rain and becomes important to the agriculturist. Thus it is coupled in the divine blessing with rain, or mentioned as a prime source of fertility, ( Genesis 27:28 ; 33:13 ; Zechariah 8:12 ) and its withdrawal is attributed to a curse. ( 2 Samuel 1:21 ; 1 Kings 17:1 ; Haggai 1:10 ) It becomes a leading object in prophetic imagery by reason of its penetrating moisture without the apparent effort of rain, ( 32:2 ; Job 29:19 ; Psalms 133:3 ; Hosea 14:5 ) while its speedy evanescence typifies the transient goodness of the hypocrite. ( Hosea 6:4 ; 13:3 ) biblestudytools.com
  18. "There is no dew properly so called in Palestine, for there is no moisture in the hot summer air to be chilled into dew-drops by the coldness of the night. From May till October rain is unknown, the sun shining with unclouded brightness day after day. The heat becomes intense, the ground hard, and vegetation would perish but for the moist west winds that come each night from the sea. The bright skies cause the heat of the day to radiate very quickly into space, so that the nights are as cold as the day is the reverse, a peculiarity of climate from which poor Jacob suffered thousands of years ago ( Genesis 31:40 ). To this coldness of the night air the indispensable watering of all plant-life is due. The winds, loaded with moisture, are robbed of it as they pass over the land, the cold air condensing it into drops of water, which fall in a gracious rain of mist on every thirsty blade. In the morning the fog thus created rests like a sea over the plains, and far up the sides of the hills, which raise their heads above it like so many islands. At sunrise, however, the scene speedily changes. By the kindling light the mist is transformed into vast snow-white clouds, which presently break into separate masses and rise up the mountain-sides, to disappear in the blue above, dissipated by the increasing heat. These are 'the morning clouds and the early dew that go away' of which ( Hosea 6:4 ; 13:3 ) speaks so touchingly" (Geikie's The Holy Land, etc., i., p. 72). Dew is a source of great fertility ( Genesis 27:28 ; Deuteronomy 33:13 ; Zechariah 8:12 ), and its withdrawal is regarded as a curse from God ( 2 Samuel 1:21 ; 1 Kings 17:1 ). It is the symbol of a multitude ( 2 Samuel 17:12 ; Psalms 110:3 ); and from its refreshing influence it is an emblem of brotherly love and harmony ( Psalms 133:3 ), and of rich spiritual blessings ( Hosea 14:5 ). biblestudytools.com
  19. d[=u], n. moisture deposited from the air on cooling, esp. at night, in minute specks upon the surface of objects: early freshness (esp. in DEW OF HIS YOUTH).--v.t. to wet with dew: to moisten.--ns. DEW'BERR'Y, a kind of bramble or blackberry having a bluish dew-like bloom on the fruit; DEW'-CLAW, a rudimentary inner toe of a dog's hind-foot; DEW'DROP; DEW'FALL, the falling of dew, the time it falls; DEW'POINT, the temperature at which dew begins to form; DEW'-RETT'ING, the process of rotting away the gummy part of hemp or flax by exposure on the grass to dew and rain; DEW'STONE, a Nottinghamshire limestone; DEW'-WORM, the common earthworm.--adj. DEW'Y.--MOUNTAIN DEW (slang), whisky, originally illicitly distilled or smuggled spirits. [A.S. deáw; cf. Ice. dögg, Ger. thau, dew.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  20. d[=u], n. an obsolete spelling of due. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  21. Atmospheric vapour condensed in small drops on cool surfaces from evening to morning; freshness, refreshing or gently stealing influence, (usu. of sleep, eloquence, youth, music, &c.); any beaded or glistening moisture, esp. tears, sweat; mountain-d., illicitly distilled whisky; dewberry, kind of blackberry; d.-claw, rudimentary inner toe of some dogs; d.-drop; d.-fall, time when d. begins to form, evening; d.-point, temperature at which it forms; d.-rake, for surface of grass or stubble; d.-ret v.t., RET by exposure to d. instead of steeping in water; d.-worm, large garden worm. Hence dewless, dewy, aa., dewily adv., dewiness n. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  22. (Impers.) form or fall as d. (it is beginning to d.); bedew, moisten. [Middle English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  23. n. [Anglo-Saxon] Aqueous vapour condensed on the surface of bodies colder than the lower strata of the atmosphere. Cabinet Dictionary
  24. The moisture upon the ground. Complete Dictionary

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