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Definitions of disease

  1. an impairment of health or a condition of abnormal functioning Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. Lack of ease; uneasiness; trouble; vexation; disquiet. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. An alteration in the state of the body or of some of its organs, interrupting or disturbing the performance of the vital functions, and causing or threatening pain and weakness; malady; affection; illness; sickness; disorder; -- applied figuratively to the mind, to the moral character and habits, to institutions, the state, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To deprive of ease; to disquiet; to trouble; to distress. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To derange the vital functions of; to afflict with disease or sickness; to disorder; - used almost exclusively in the participle diseased. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. A definite pathologic process with a characteristic set of signs and symptoms. It may affect the whole body or any of its parts, and its etiology, pathology, and prognosis may be known or unknown. Medical Dictionary DB
  7. Disorder of mind or body; malady; illness. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8. To cause disease in; derange. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  9. Arteriopathy, arteriosclerosis, arteriofibrosis, atheroma, arteriomalacia, arteriostosis, arteriasis. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  10. Want of ease, hence pain: disorder or want of health in mind or body: ailment: cause of pain. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  11. Malady; sickness; ailment. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  12. To cause disease in; disorder. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  13. Disturbed or abnormal action in the living organism; sickness; illness. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. A derangement in the structure or the function of any organ belonging to a vegetable, an animal, or a spiritual organizm, or to any organized body, such as a state. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  15. Any deviation from health; sickness; illness; disorder in any part of the body. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  16. To afflict with disease; to impair any part of the body; to makemorbid. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  17. To derange the vital functions of; to afflict with disease or sickness; to disorder; -- used almost exclusively in the participle diseased. mso.anu.edu.au
  18. diz-[=e]z', n. a disorder or want of health in mind or body: ailment: cause of pain.--v.t. (Spens.) to make uneasy.--p.adj. DISEASED', affected with disease.--n. DISEAS'EDNESS.--adj. DISEASE'FUL. [O. Fr. desaise, des--L. dis, neg., aise, ease.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  19. old French desaiee; from dis, and ease: Morbus, Nosos, Nosema, Noseuma, Nusus, Pathos, Pathema, Lues, Malum, Passio, AEgritudo, AEgrotatio, Vitium, Arrhostia, Arrhostemu, Arrhostenia, Valetudo adversa, Malady, Complaint, Sickness, Distemper, Ailment, Illness, (F.) Maladie. An opposite state to that of health, consisting in a change either in the position and structure of parts, or in the exercise of one or more of their functions, or in both. By some, Disease is applied to structural change, whilst Disorder is restricted to functional derangement. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  20. Any deviation from health presenting fairly well-marked and regular symptoms and having a definite and characteristic etiological or pathological character. D. is a generic term, usually restricted, however, to the more serious perversions of health; affection has special reference to the part or organ which is at fault; disorder denotes derangement of function, especially a transitory one; illness and sickness have special reference to the sensations or symptoms, and are applied to the person suffering from the disease. Ds are classed according to (A) nature, as Constitutional (or General or Systemic), which originate in some altered state of the whole system, and more or less affect the whole body; and Local (or Topical), which originate in and remain confined to one part. (B) origin; as Idiopathic (or Primary),when not due to other as; Secondary, when due to another d., and occurring either as a symptom (Symptomatic d.) or as a sequela; and Intercurrent or Complicating, when occurring along with another d., whether due to it or not. (C) mode of origin; as Zymotic, due to fermentative action (i. e., to morbid germs and their ptomaines); Specific, due to a special characteristic morbific agency, whether zymotic or not. (D) method of generation and transmission as Infectious d., Contagious d., etc. (E) exciting cause; as Occupation due to the patients mode of living; d’s, due to sexual intercourse; Filth d’s, due to dirt and overcrowding; Miasmatic (or Paludal or Malarial) d’s; Parasitic d’s. (F) nature of the change produced, as Functional d., in which there is alteration of function without alteration of structure; Nutritional d., in which there is alteration of function and nutrition without visible lesions although lesions too minute to be seen probably exist; Structural d., in which there are changes or structure visible with the micro­scope; and Organic (or Coarse) d., in which there are lesions visible to the naked eye. (G) nature of the pathological process; as Congestive d., Inflammatory d. (H) site of the lesion, as Focal d., in which the lesion occupies a circumscribed spot; Disseminated d., in which there are multiple circumscribed lesions; Diffuse d., in which the lesion is uncircumscribed; System d., in which the lesion occupies a nerve-tract, making up a special system; Parenchymatous d., in which the parenchyma of an organ is affected; Interstitial d., in which the interstitial tissue of an organ is attacked. (I) organ or set of organs affected; as Respiratory d’s Circulatory d’s, Digestive (or Chylopoietic), Assimilative, Haematopoietic, Genito-urinary (Sexual), Locomotor, Nervous, and Psychic (or Mental) d’s. (K) course; as Acute, Sub­acute, and Chronic. Specially-named ds (L) are Addisons (Bronzed-skin d.), Base­dows (or Graves), etc., see Addisons d., etc. na
  21. Morbid condition of body, plant, or some part of them, illness, sickness; any particular kind of this with special symptoms& name: deranged or depraved state of mind or morals. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  22. Deviation from a state of health. American pocket medical dictionary.
  23. n. Lack of ease; uneasiness;—a morbid or unhealthy condition of body; sickness—applied figuratively to the mind, to the moral character and habits, to institutions, &c.;—disorder; distemper; malady; sickness; indisposition. Cabinet Dictionary
  24. Distemper, malady, sickness. Complete Dictionary

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