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Definitions of disuse

  1. To disaccustom; - with to or from; as, disused to toil. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. To cease to use. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  3. To cease to use or practice. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4. To cease to use; to disaccustom. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  5. To cease to use; to neglect to practise. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  6. Cessation of use, practice, or exercise; inusitation; desuetude; as, the limbs lose their strength by disuse. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. A ceasing to use; neglect. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  8. Cessation or giving up of use or custom. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  9. Cessation of use or custom. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  10. The act of disusing; abandonment. disusage. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  11. Cessation of use, practice, or exercise; cessation of custom; desuetude. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  12. Want or neglect of use; cessation of practice or exercise. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

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Usage examples for disuse

  1. In the domain of finance it effected a revolution as signal as that produced in the relations of labour to capital by the disuse of the old labour laws. – The History of Currency, 1252 to 1896 by William Arthur Shaw
  2. Pete wondered why men must invariably abuse things that were patently useful, when those things did not belong to any one especially; for the stove, the windows, the table, the two home- made chairs showed more than disuse – The Ridin' Kid from Powder River by Henry Herbert Knibbs
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