Spellcheck.net

Definitions of diverge

  1. be at variance with; be out of line with Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. have no limits; used of mathematical series Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. move or draw apart; "The two paths diverge here" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. extend in a different direction; "The lines start to diverge here"; "Their interests diverged" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. have no limits as a mathematical series Wordnet Dictionary DB
  6. To extend from a common point in different directions; to tend from one point and recede from each other; to tend to spread apart; to turn aside or deviate (as from a given direction); -- opposed to converge; as, rays of light diverge as they proceed from the sun. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To differ from a typical form; to vary from a normal condition; to dissent from a creed or position generally held or taken. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To spread out from one point: opposite to converge. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  9. To incline or turn asunder: to tend from a common point in different directions. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  10. DIVERGINGLY. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  11. To turn apart; tend in different ways from one point. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  12. To deviate; differ. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  13. To tend from a point in lines which recede farther and farther from each other; to vary from the type; to deviate. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  14. To spread out from one point; to tend from one point and recede from each other, as straight lines from the centre of a circle, or rays of light from a luminous body; opposite of converge. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  15. If a series of approximations to some value get progressivelyfurther from it then the series is said to diverge.The reduction of some term under some evaluation strategydiverges if it does not reach a normal form after a finitenumber of reductions. foldoc_fs
  16. di-v[.e]rj', v.i. to incline or turn apart: to tend from a common point in different directions: to vary from the standard.--ns. DIVERGE'MENT; DIVERG'ENCE, DIVERG'ENCY, a tendency to recede from one point.--adj. DIVERG'ENT.--adv. DIVERG'INGLY. [L. dis, asunder, verg[)e]re, to incline.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  17. [Latin] To tend apart or away from; to become separated more and more; of the eyes, to be directed away from each other, so that the lines of sight separate more and more and thus intersect beyond the object looked at. na
  18. Proceed in different directions from point or each other; go aside from track; differ, deviate; make d., deflect. Hence divergence, divergency, nn., divergent a., divergently, divergingly, advv. [Latin] Concise Oxford Dictionary

What are the misspellings for diverge?

X