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Definitions of diverge

  1. To tend from a point in lines which recede farther and farther from each other; to vary from the type; to deviate. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To differ from a typical form; to vary from a normal condition; to dissent from a creed or position generally held or taken. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To spread out from one point: opposite to converge. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  4. To incline or turn asunder: to tend from a common point in different directions. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  5. To deviate; differ. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  6. be at variance with; be out of line with Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. move or draw apart; "The two paths diverge here" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. extend in a different direction; "The lines start to diverge here"; "Their interests diverged" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. have no limits as a mathematical series Wordnet Dictionary DB
  10. To extend from a common point in different directions; to tend from one point and recede from each other; to tend to spread apart; to turn aside or deviate (as from a given direction); -- opposed to converge; as, rays of light diverge as they proceed from the sun. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To spread out from one point; to tend from one point and recede from each other, as straight lines from the centre of a circle, or rays of light from a luminous body; opposite of converge. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  12. DIVERGINGLY. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.

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Usage examples for diverge

  1. Ralph was soon upon his steed, and on the road; but the Providence that watches over and protects the innocent was with him, and it happened, most fortunately, that just before he reached the point at which his enemy stood in watch, the badness of the road had compelled those who travelled it to diverge aside for a few paces into a little by- path, which, at a little distance beyond, and when the bad places had been rounded, brought the traveller again into the proper path. – Guy Rivers: A Tale of Georgia by William Gilmore Simms
  2. We have no right, they say, to assume, should we find that a variable species can no longer be made to vary in a certain direction, that it has reached the utmost limit to which it might under more favourable conditions or if more time were allowed be made to diverge from the parent type. – The Antiquity of Man by Charles Lyell
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