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Definitions of dock

  1. a short or shortened tail of certain animals Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. deprive someone of benefits, as a penalty Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the solid bony part of the tail of an animal as distinguished from the hair Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. landing in a harbor next to a pier where ships are loaded and unloaded or repaired; may have gates to let water in or out; "the ship arrived at the dock more than a day late" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. an enclosure in a court of law where the defendant sits during the trial Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. a platform where trucks or trains can be loaded or unloaded Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. a platform built out from the shore into the water and supported by piles; provides access to ships and boats Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. any of certain coarse weedy plants with long taproots, sometimes used as table greens or in folk medicine Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. haul into a dock; "dock the ships" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. remove or shorten the tail of an animal Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. deduct from someone's wages Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. come into dock; "the ship docked" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. A genus of plants (Rumex), some species of which are well-known weeds which have a long taproot and are difficult of extermination. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. The solid part of an animal's tail, as distinguished from the hair; the stump of a tail; the part of a tail left after clipping or cutting. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. A case of leather to cover the clipped or cut tail of a horse. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. to cut off, as the end of a thing; to curtail; to cut short; to clip; as, to dock the tail of a horse. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To cut off a part from; to shorten; to deduct from; to subject to a deduction; as, to dock one's wages. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To cut off, bar, or destroy; as, to dock an entail. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. The place in court where a criminal or accused person stands. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To draw, law, or place (a ship) in a dock, for repairing, cleaning the bottom, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. An artificial basin or an inclosure in connection with a harbor or river, - used for the reception of vessels, and provided with gates for keeping in or shutting out the tide. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. The slip or water way extending between two piers or projecting wharves, for the reception of ships; - sometimes including the piers themselves; as, to be down on the dock. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. A place for keeping ships; the place where a prisoner stands in a court to be tried; a coarse weed with broad leaves; the solid part of the tail of a horse. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  24. To cut off or curtail; diminish; bring to a pier, and moor, as a ship. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  25. The rump of a horse. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. A troublesome weed with large leaves and a long root, difficult to eradicate. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  27. To cut short: to curtail: to cut off: to clip. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  28. The part of a tail left after clipping. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  29. An inclosure or artificial basin near a harbor or river, for the reception of vessels: the box in court where the accused stands. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  30. To place in a dock. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  31. Artificial basin for ships; a coarse large-leaved weed. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  32. To cut short; curtail; palce in a dock. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  33. To shorten; cut off, as the tail of a horse. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. To lay up in or as in dock. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. Any one of various plants of the buckwheat family. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. An artificial basin for vesseis; also, a wharf. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. An enclosed space for prisoners in a court - room. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. The stump of a tail. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. The rumex, a genus of plants of several species. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. The tail of a beast cut short; the stump; a case of leather to cover the stump. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  41. A broad deep trench on the side of a harbour, or bank of a river, in which ships are built or repaired; an artificial enclosure or basin for the reception of ships; the place where a criminal stands in court. Wet-docks, docks for the purpose of loading and unloading vessels. Dry-docks, docks for building and repairing them. A Naval dock, a place provided with all sorts of stores and materials for the royal navy. A dock company, a corporate body or association owning docks. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. To cut short; to curtail; to cut off; to deduct from; to destroy or defeat. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  43. To draw or place a ship in a dock. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  44. To cut or lop off the end of a thing; to curtail; to shorten. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  45. The tail of a beast cut short; the solid part of the tail; a term applied to several plants having leaves broad in proportion to their length, as sour-dock, burdock. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  46. The inclosure or box in which a criminal is placed at his trial. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  47. An inclosed basin for repairing ships; a large pond at the side of a river, or at its mouth, where the water is kept out by flood-gates till the ship is built or repaired; the water-way extending between two wharves. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  48. An artificial basin or an inclosure in connection with a harbor or river, -- used for the reception of vessels, and provided with gates for keeping in or shutting out the tide. mso.anu.edu.au
  49. The slip or water way extending between two piers or projecting wharves, for the reception of ships; -- sometimes including the piers themselves; as, to be down on the dock. mso.anu.edu.au
  50. dok, n. a troublesome weed with large leaves and a long root.--n. DOCK'-CRESS, the nipplewort. [A.S. docce; perh. from Gael. dogha, a burdock.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  51. dok, v.t. to cut short: to curtail: to cut off: to clip.--n. the part of a tail left after clipping. [Prob. W. tocio, to cut short; or Old Ice. dockr, a stumpy tail.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  52. dok, n. an enclosure or artificial basin near a harbour or river, for the reception of vessels: the box in court where the accused stands: in a railway station, the place of arrival and departure of a train.--v.t. to place in a dock.--ns. DOCK'AGE, accommodation in docks for ships: dock-dues; DOCK'ER, one who works in the docks; DOCK'-MAS'TER, the person superintending a dock; DOCK'-WARR'ANT, a warehouse receipt; DOCK'YARD, a naval establishment with docks, building-slips, stores, &c.; DRY'-DOCK, a dock which can be laid dry by dock-gates, pumping, &c.--also called GRAV'ING-DOCK, because suitable for cleaning or graving the sides and bottoms of ships; FLOAT'ING-DOCK, a dock which floats in the water, but can by pumping out its hollow sides be raised high in the water with any ship that has been floated into it, and then emptied of water by further pumping; WET'-DOCK, a dock maintaining a level nearly uniform with that of high water. [Old Dut. dokke; perh. from Low L. doga, a canal--Gr. doch[=e], a receptacle--dechesthai, to receive.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  53. Rumex -d. Bitter, Rumex obtusifolius -d. Bloody, Rumex sanguineus -d. Bloodyveined, Rumex sanguineus -d. Blunt-leaved, Rumex obtusifolius. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  54. See Rumex. na
  55. Kinds of coarse weedy herb, popular antidote for nettle stings. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  56. Solid fleshy part of animal\'s tail; crupper of saddle or harness. [German] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  57. Cut short (animal in tail, person in hair; or tail &c.); lessen. deprive of, put limits on (person, supplies); (Law) d. the entail, cut it off; docktailed, with tail docked. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  58. Basin with flood-gates in which ships may be loaded, unloaded, or repaired (dry or graving d., for repairing or building, water being pumped out; wet d., with water kept at high-tide level; floating d., floating structure usable as dry d.); (usu. pl.) range of d. basins with wharves and offices, dockyard; (Railway) platform-enclosure in which line terminates; d.-dues, charge for use of dock, also dockage (4) n.; d.-master, superintendent of dockyard or enclosure with dd. & all ship building& repairing appliances, esp. in connexion with Navy. (Vb) bring (ship), (of ship) come, into d.; furnish with dd. [Dutch] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  59. Enclosure in criminal court for prisoner. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  60. n. [Anglo-Saxon] A common weed of the genus Rumex, having a long tap root and large broad leaves. Cabinet Dictionary
  61. n. [Icelandic] The stump of a tail, or the part left after cutting or clipping;—a case to cover the clipped or cut tail of a horse. Cabinet Dictionary
  62. n. [Greek] An inclosure artificially constructed on the side of a harbor or bank of a river, and closed by gates, for the reception of ships;—usually classed as dry dock or graving dock, in which the water can be pumped out to facilitate repairs on the bottom of ships; and wet dock, in which the water is kept at high level to float the ships, and permit their exit at high tide;—the place where a criminal or accused person stands in court. Cabinet Dictionary
  63. The stump of the tail, which remains after docking. Complete Dictionary
  64. A place where water is let in or out at pleasure, where ships are built or laid up. Complete Dictionary

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