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Definitions of don

  1. To put on; to dress in; to invest one's self with. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. To put on; assume. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  3. To do or put on: to assume:-pr.p. donning; pa.p. donned'. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4. To put on, as a garment. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  5. Celtic goddess; mother of Gwydion and Arianrhod; corresponds to Irish Danu Wordnet Dictionary DB
  6. teacher at a university of college (especially at Cambridge or Oxford) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  7. To put on; to invest with. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  8. To put on; to assume; opposite of doff. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  9. Donning. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  10. a European river in southwestern Russia; flows into the Sea of Azov Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a Spanish title of respect for a gentleman or nobleman Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. A grand personage, or one making pretension to consequence; especially, the head of a college, or one of the fellows at the English universities. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Sir; Mr; Signior; - a title in Spain, formerly given to noblemen and gentlemen only, but now common to all classes. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. A great person; Don, a Spanish title of rank. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  15. A Spanish title, corresponding to English Sir, formerly applied only to noblemen, now to all classes. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  16. A Spanish title, corresponding to Sir. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  17. Signor; sir. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  18. A Spanish title, formerly given to noblemen and gentlemen only, but now common to all classes; an important personage; a person of self importance; a fellow or an officer of a college. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  19. A Spanish title of nobility, now a title of respect, of general application. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  20. DONNA. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. Donned. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.

What are the misspellings for don?

Usage examples for don

  1. Yes, but he's never been don enough to bring old Boil O back to his senses. – Will of the Mill by George Manville Fenn
  2. Don Quixote for Young People. – Literature for Children by Orton Lowe
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