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Definitions of down

  1. low in spirits; "lonely and blue in a strange city"; "depressed by the loss of his job"; "a dispirited and resigned expression on her face"; "downcast after his defeat"; "feeling discouraged and downhearted" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. eat immoderately; "Some people can down a pound of meat in the course of one meal" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. cut down; "the tree is down" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. cause to come or go down; "The policeman downed the heavily armed suspect"; "The mugger knocked down the old lady after she refused to hand over her wallet" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. becoming progressively lower; "steadily declining incomes"; "the down trend in the real estate market" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. lower than previously; "the market is depressed"; "prices are down" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. shoot at and force to come down; of aircraft Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a complete play to advance the football; "you have 4 downs to gain 10 yards" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. soft fine feathers Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. (usually plural) a rolling treeless highland with little soil Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. English physician who first described Down's syndrome (1828-1896) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. spatially or metaphorically from a higher to a lower level or position; "don't fall down"; "rode the lift up and skied down"; "prices plunged downward" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. away from a more central or a more northerly place; "was sent down to work at the regional office"; "worked down on the farm"; "came down for the wedding"; "flew down to Florida" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. paid in cash at time of purchase; "put ten dollars down on the necklace" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. in an inactive or inoperative state; "the factory went down during the strike"; "the computer went down again" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. to a lower intensity; "he slowly phased down the light until the stage was completely black" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. the fractional price paid in cash at time of purchase; "the down payment"; "a payment of $200 down" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  18. understood perfectly; "had his algebra problems down" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  19. extending or moving from a higher to a lower place; "the down staircase"; "the downward course of the stream" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  20. out; "two down in the last of the ninth" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  21. improve or perfect by pruning or polishing; "refine one's style of writing" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  22. (American football) a complete play to advance the football; "you have 4 downs to gain 10 yards" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  23. fine soft dense hair (as the fine short hair of cattle or deer or the wool of sheep or the undercoat of certain dogs) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  24. bring down or defeat (an opponent) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  25. drink down entirely; "He downed three martinis before dinner"; "She killed a bottle of brandy that night"; "They popped a few beer after work" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  26. shoot at and force to come down; "the enemy landed several of our aircraft" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  27. not functioning (temporarily or permanently); "we can't work because the computer is down" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  28. shut; "the shades were down" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  29. becoming progressively lower; "the down trend in the real estate market" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  30. being or moving lower in position or less in some value; "lay face down"; "the moon is down"; "our team is down by a run"; "down by a pawn"; "the stock market is down today" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  31. from an earlier time; "the story was passed down from father to son" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  32. Fine, soft, hairy outgrowth from the skin or surface of animals or plants, not matted and fleecy like wool Webster Dictionary DB
  33. The soft under feathers of birds. They have short stems with soft rachis and bards and long threadlike barbules, without hooklets. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. The pubescence of plants; the hairy crown or envelope of the seeds of certain plants, as of the thistle. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. The soft hair of the face when beginning to appear. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. That which is made of down, as a bed or pillow; that which affords ease and repose, like a bed of down Webster Dictionary DB
  37. To cover, ornament, line, or stuff with down. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. A road for shipping in the English Channel or Straits of Dover, near Deal, employed as a naval rendezvous in time of war. Webster Dictionary DB
  39. A state of depression; low state; abasement. Webster Dictionary DB
  40. From a higher to a lower position, literally or figuratively; in a descending direction; from the top of an ascent; from an upright position; to the ground or floor; to or into a lower or an inferior condition; as, into a state of humility, disgrace, misery, and the like; into a state of rest; -- used with verbs indicating motion. Webster Dictionary DB
  41. In a low or the lowest position, literally or figuratively; at the bottom of a decent; below the horizon; of the ground; in a condition of humility, dejection, misery, and the like; in a state of quiet. Webster Dictionary DB
  42. From a remoter or higher antiquity. Webster Dictionary DB
  43. From a greater to a less bulk, or from a thinner to a thicker consistence; as, to boil down in cookery, or in making decoctions. Webster Dictionary DB
  44. In a descending direction along; from a higher to a lower place upon or within; at a lower place in or on; as, down a hill; down a well. Webster Dictionary DB
  45. Hence: Towards the mouth of a river; towards the sea; as, to sail or swim down a stream; to sail down the sound. Webster Dictionary DB
  46. To cause to go down; to make descend; to put down; to overthrow, as in wrestling; hence, to subdue; to bring down. Webster Dictionary DB
  47. To go down; to descend. Webster Dictionary DB
  48. Downcast; as, a down look. Webster Dictionary DB
  49. Downright; absolute; positive; as, a down denial. Webster Dictionary DB
  50. Downward; going down; sloping; as, a down stroke; a down grade; a down train on a railway. Webster Dictionary DB
  51. A bank or rounded hillock of sand thrown up by the wind along or near the shore; a flattish-topped hill; - usually in the plural. Webster Dictionary DB
  52. A tract of poor, sandy, undulating or hilly land near the sea, covered with fine turf which serves chiefly for the grazing of sheep; - usually in the plural. Webster Dictionary DB
  53. In the direction of gravity or toward the center of the earth; toward or in a lower place or position; below; - the opposite of up. Webster Dictionary DB
  54. Soft feathers, hair, or wool; the soft fibers of plants; banks or small, rounded hills of sand. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  55. From a higher to a lower degree or position; at the lowest point; on the ground; below the horizon; opposite to up; from earlier to later times; in hand, or on the counter; as, to pay down for goods; on paper, or in a book. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  56. Dejected; downcast. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  57. Along a descent of; from a higher to a lower place on; along the course or current of. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  58. The soft hair under the feathers of fowls: the hairy covering of the seeds of certain plants: anything which soothes or invites to repose. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  59. A bank of sand thrown up by the sea:-pl. a tract of hilly land, used for pasturing sheep. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  60. From a higher to a lower position: on the ground: from earlier to later times. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  61. Along a descent: from a higher to a lower position or state. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  62. Along a descent. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  63. In a descending direction; on the ground; below the horizon. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  64. Soft feathers or fine hair; bank of sand thrown up by the sea. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  65. Fine soft plumage, hair, or fibers. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  66. A flat - topped treeless hill; undulating tract of upland. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  67. From a higher to or toward a lower place or position; downward to or on the ground; below the horizon. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  68. In a descending direction along, upon, or within. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  69. Downcast. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  70. From a higher to a lower place; from the capital or the centre; on the ground; below the horizon; from a higher to a lower condition; into disrepute or disgrace; into smaller bulk; from earlier to later times; extended or prostrate on the ground or on any flat surface. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  71. Along a descent; from a higher to a lower place; toward the mouth of a river; from the capital of a country; from the head terminus of a railway. Down the sound, in the direction of the ebb-tide toward the sea. Down the country, toward the sea or from the metropolis. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  72. The fine soft feathers of fowls, particularly of the duck kind; fine hair; a fine hairy substance, the pubescence of flowers; a fine feathery substance, by which seeds are wafted to a distance; anything that soothes, or a place of soft repose. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  73. A bank of sand thrown up by the sea; a tract of naked hilly land used only for pasturing sheep. The downs, a well-known road for shipping in the English Channel near Deal. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  74. A depressed state. Up and down, here and there. Down with, to pull down or throw or take down. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  75. The fine soft feathers of fowls; any fine hairy substance light enough to float in the air. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  76. From a higher to a lower place; on the ground; extended or prostrate on any surface; toward the mouth of a river; below the horizon, as the sun; into a due consistence, as, to boil down. Note.-Persons in London say down to Scotland, &c., and those in the provinces, up to London. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  77. A bank or rounded hillock of sand thrown up by the wind along or near the shore; a flattish-topped hill; -- usually in the plural. mso.anu.edu.au
  78. A tract of poor, sandy, undulating or hilly land near the sea, covered with fine turf which serves chiefly for the grazing of sheep; -- usually in the plural. mso.anu.edu.au
  79. In the direction of gravity or toward the center of the earth; toward or in a lower place or position; below; -- the opposite of up. mso.anu.edu.au
  80. 1. Not operating. "The up escalator is down" is considered ahumorous thing to say, and "The elevator is down" alwaysmeans "The elevator isn't working" and never refers to whatfloor the elevator is on. With respect to computers, thisterm has passed into the mainstream; the extension to otherkinds of machine is still hackish.2. "go down" To stop functioning; usually said of thesystem. The message from the console that every hackerhates to hear from the operator is "System going down in 5minutes".3. "take down", "bring down" To deactivate purposely, usuallyfor repair work or PM. "I'm taking the system down to workon that bug in the tape drive." Occasionally one hears theword "down" by itself used as a verb in this sense.See crash; opposite: up. foldoc_fs
  81. down, n. the soft hair under the feathers of fowls: the hairy covering of the seeds of certain plants: anything which soothes or invites to repose.--n. DOWN'-BED.--p.adj. DOWNED, filled or covered with down.--ns. DOWN'INESS; DOWN'-QUILT.--adj. DOWN'Y, covered with or made of down: like down: soft: soothing: (slang) knowing.--THE DOWNY (slang), bed. [Ice. dúnn; Ger. daune, dune.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  82. down, n. a bank of sand thrown up by the sea (same as DUNE): a treeless land: (pl.) a tract of hilly land, used for pasturing sheep, as the North Downs (Kent) and South Downs (Sussex)--also given to the famous roadstead off the east coast of Kent, inside the Goodwin Sands. [A.S. dún, a hill; prob. from Celt. dun, as in Dunkeld, &c.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  83. down, adv. from a higher to a lower position: on the ground: from earlier to later times: from thick to thin, from large to small (to boil down, to cut down): from more to less (to beat down a price).--prep. along a descent: from a higher to a lower position or state.--v.t. to knock down: to dispirit--also used as a kind of interjection, with get, go, come, kneel, &c. understood.--n. a tendency to be down upon, a grudge against: a descent, reverse of fortune.--v.i. DOWN'-BEAR, to bear or press down.--adj. DOWN'CAST, dejected.--ns. DOWN'COME, a fall, ruin, a heavy pour of rain; DOWN'-DRAUGHT, a current of air downwards; DOWN'-EAST'ER, one living 'down east' from the speaker, a New Englander, and esp. an inhabitant of Maine; DOWN'FALL, fall, failure, humiliation, ruin: a falling down, as of rain.--adjs. DOWN'FALLEN, ruined; DOWN'-GYVED (Shak.), hanging down like fetters.--n. DOWN'-HAUL, a rope by which a jib, &c., is hauled down when set.--adjs. DOWN'-HEART'ED, dejected; DOWN'HILL, descending, sloping.--n. DOWN'-LINE, the line of a railway leading from the capital, or other important centre, to the provinces.--adj. DOWN'LOOKED (Dryden), downcast, gloomy.--ns. DOWN'-LY'ING, time of retiring to rest: a woman's lying-in; DOWN'POUR, a heavy fall of rain, &c.--adv. DOWN'RIGHT (obs.), perpendicular: in plain terms: utterly.--adj. plain spoken: brusque: utter (as in downright madness).--ns. DOWN'RIGHTNESS; DOWN'RUSH, a rushing down (as of gas, hot air, &c.); DOWN'-SET'TING, a setting down, a snub; DOWN'-SIT'TING, sitting down, time of rest (Ps. cxxxix. 2).--advs. DOWN'STAIRS, in, or to, a lower story; DOWN'-STREAM, with the current.--ns. DOWN'-THROW, act of throwing down, state of being thrown down: a sinking of strata below the level of the surrounding beds; DOWN'-TRAIN, a railway train proceeding from the chief terminus.--adj. DOWN'-TRODDEN, trampled on, tyrannised over.--advs. DOWN'WARD, DOWN'WARDS, from higher to lower: from source to outlet: from more ancient to modern: in the lower part.--adj. DOWN'WARD.--DOWN EAST (U.S.), in or into Maine and adjoining parts of New England; DOWN IN THE MOUTH, in low spirits; DOWN ON ONE'S LUCK, in ill-luck; DOWN SOUTH, in the southern states; DOWN TO THE COUNTRY, away into the country, from London (hence 'down to the Derby,' 'down to Scotland'); DOWN WITH YOUR MONEY, lay it down, pay it.--A DOWN-TRAIN, a train away from London.--LAY DOWN THE LAW, to expound authoritatively. [A corr. of M. E. a-dawn, adun--A.S. of dúne, 'from the hill'--A.S. dún, a hill.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  84. see Attack. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  85. Open high land, esp. (pl.) treeless undulating chalk uplands of S. England used for pasture; =DUNE; the Dd., part of sea (opposite North Dd.) within Goodwin Sands. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  86. First covering of young birds; bird\'s under plumage, used in cushions &c.; fine short hair, esp. first hair on face, also on fruit &c.; fluffy substance. [old Norse] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  87. (super)., a. or adv., downmost). 1. (Motion): from above, to lower place, to ground (come d., from bedroom; knock, fall, d.; sun, ship, goes d., sets, sinks; food goes d., is swallowed; get d., swallow, alight; book &c. goes d., finds acceptance; get, set, d., from carriage &c.; brought d. by river; money d., pay d., at once, as though on counter; write, set, put, take &c., d., on to paper; so Bill d. for second reading today); to place regarded as lower, into helpless position, with current or wind, south-wards, from capital or university, (Lord\'s amendments sent d. to Commons; bear or beat d., sail to leeward; run, ride, hunt, d., bring to bay; shout, hiss, d., silence; d. to Norfolk from Scotland, to Scotland or the country from London; go d., for vacation or at end of university life; send d., university punishment; up& d., to& fro); (ellipt. for imperat. of) lie. get, put, &c., d. (d., Ponto!; d. helm. put the HELM d.; & with, d. with the aristocrats!). 2. (Station): in lower place (blinds were d.; is not d. yet, i.e. out of his bedroom); not up in capital or university; in fallen posture, prostrate, at low level, in depression, humiliation, &c., (hit man who is d.; many d. with fever; sun, tide, are d.; down in the mouth or d. or d.-hearted, dispirited; bread is d., cheaper). 3. (Order, time, quanlity): inclusively of lower limit in series (from King d. to cobbler); from earlier to later time (custom handed d.); to finer consistency (boil, grind, wear, thin, d.); into quiescence (calm d.). 4. (Phrases); be d. on, pounce upon, treat severely; d. to the ground, completely; d. at HEEL; d. on one\'s LUCK. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  88. Downwards along, through, or into; from top to bottom of; at a lower part of (situated d. the Thames); up& d., to& fro along; d. town, into the town from higher part; d. the wind, with it (let go d. the w., abandon, discard). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  89. (not compared). Directed down-wards (d. leap, look; d. grade, descending slope in railroad, fig. Deterioration); d. train, going, coming, from London, d. platform, for such train\'s departure or arrival. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  90. (colloq.). Put, throw, knock, (usu. person) d. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  91. Reverse of fortune (usu. ups &dd.); (Dominoes) =POSE; have a d. on, dislike, tend to be d. upon, (colloq.). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  92. d.-draught, downward draught, esp. one driving smoke down chimney into room. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  93. d. tools, strike work. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  94. n. [Icelandic] The fine soft feathers of birds, especially of the eider duck;—the fine hair growing on the chin at puberty;—the pubescence of plants; the pappus or fine hairy growth by which seeds are conveyed, as in the thistle. Cabinet Dictionary
  95. n. [Anglo-Saxon] A bank or hillock of sand thrown up by the sea;—a tract of sandy and barren land;—a large open plain on elevated land;—pl. A road for shipping in the English Channel, near Deal. Cabinet Dictionary
  96. prep. [Anglo-Saxon] Along a descent; towards a lower place, station, or position:—toward the mouth of a river, or toward the place where water is discharged into the ocean or a lake. Cabinet Dictionary
  97. adv. In a descending direction; tending from a higher to a lower place from a higher to a lower condition; —from a remoter or higher antiquity;—below the horizon in a low position or condition; on the ground; — in humility, disgrace, and the like. Cabinet Dictionary
  98. Soft feathers; anything that sooths or mollifies; soft wool, or tender hair; the soft fibres of plants which wing the seeds. Complete Dictionary
  99. A large open plain or valley. Complete Dictionary
  100. Along a descent, from a higher place to a lower; towards the mouth of a river. Complete Dictionary
  101. On the ground, from the height to a lower situation; tending towards the ground; out of sight, below the horizon; to a total maceration; into disgrace, into declining reputation; Up and down, here, and there. Complete Dictionary
  102. An exhortation to destruction or demolition. Complete Dictionary

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