Spellcheck.net

Definitions of draw

  1. To pull; to act as a weight; to shrink; to move or advance; to be filled or inflated with wind; to unsheathe, as a sword; to use or practise the art of delineating figures; to cause to suppurate; to excite to inflammation, maturation, and discharge, as a blister draws well. To draw back, to retire; to withdraw; to apostatize. To draw near or nigh, to approach. To draw off, to retire; to retreat. To draw on, to advance; to approach; to gain on in pursuit; to demand payment by an order or bill, called a draft. To draw up, to form in regular order. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To play (a short-length ball directed at the leg stump) with an inclined bat so as to deflect the ball between the legs and the wicket. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To hit (the ball) with the toe of the club so that it is deflected toward the left. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To strike (the cue ball) below the center so as to give it a backward rotation which causes it to take a backward direction on striking another ball. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To throw up (the stone) gently. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To leave (a contest) undecided; as, the battle or game was drawn. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. To cause to move continuously by force applied in advance of the thing moved; to pull along; to haul; to drag; to cause to follow. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To influence to move or tend toward one's self; to exercise an attracting force upon; to call towards itself; to attract; hence, to entice; to allure; to induce. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To cause to come out for one's use or benefit; to extract; to educe; to bring forth; as: (a) To bring or take out, or to let out, from some receptacle, as a stick or post from a hole, water from a cask or well, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To pull from a sheath, as a sword. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To extract; to force out; to elicit; to derive. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. To obtain from some cause or origin; to infer from evidence or reasons; to deduce from premises; to derive. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To take or procure from a place of deposit; to call for and receive from a fund, or the like; as, to draw money from a bank. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To take from a box or wheel, as a lottery ticket; to receive from a lottery by the drawing out of the numbers for prizes or blanks; hence, to obtain by good fortune; to win; to gain; as, he drew a prize. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To select by the drawing of lots. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To remove the contents of Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To drain by emptying; to suck dry. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To extract the bowels of; to eviscerate; as, to draw a fowl; to hang, draw, and quarter a criminal. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To take into the lungs; to inhale; to inspire; hence, also, to utter or produce by an inhalation; to heave. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To extend in length; to lengthen; to protract; to stretch; to extend, as a mass of metal into wire. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To run, extend, or produce, as a line on any surface; hence, also, to form by marking; to make by an instrument of delineation; to produce, as a sketch, figure, or picture. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To represent by lines drawn; to form a sketch or a picture of; to represent by a picture; to delineate; hence, to represent by words; to depict; to describe. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To write in due form; to prepare a draught of; as, to draw a memorial, a deed, or bill of exchange. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. To trace by scent; to track; - a hunting term. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To pull along or haul; suck in; pull out; force our; to extend in length; stretch; disembowel; as, to draw a fowl; take or bring or bring out, as water; a number in a lottery, etc.; to represent on paper with a pen or pencil; to write in legal form; require to float in; as, the vessel draws twenty feet of water; inhale; as, to draw a sigh; attract or allure; receive; leave undecided; as, to draw a game. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  26. To pull along: to bring forcibly towards one: to entice: to inhale: to take out: to deduce: to lengthen: to make a picture of, by lines drawn: to describe: to require a depth of water for floating. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  27. To sketch; portray. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. To pull; haul; lead; attract. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. To pull out; extract; call forth; obtain. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. To draft; commonly with up. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. To require the depth of (so much water), as a vessel. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  32. To perform the act, or practice the art, of delineation; to sketch; to form figures or pictures. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. To become contracted; to shrink. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. To admit the action of pulling or dragging; to undergo draught; as, a carriage draws easily. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. To sink in water; to require a depth for floating. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. To pull; to exert strength in drawing anything; to have force to move anything by pulling; as, a horse draws well; the sails of a ship draw well. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. To draw a liquid from some receptacle, as water from a well. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. To exert an attractive force; to act as an inducement or enticement. Webster Dictionary DB
  39. To have draught, as a chimney, flue, or the like; to furnish transmission to smoke, gases, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  40. To unsheathe a weapon, especially a sword. Webster Dictionary DB
  41. To have efficiency as an epispastic; to act as a sinapism; - said of a blister, poultice, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  42. To make a draft or written demand for payment of money deposited or due; - usually with on or upon. Webster Dictionary DB
  43. Act as an inducement; shrink; take, pull, or force something out; move; as, to draw near; to be pulled; to practice the art of making pictures with a pen or pencil; to write a formal demand for money, supplies, etc; as, you may draw on the bank for the amount; to allow a current of air to pass; as, the chimney draws well. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  44. To pull: to practice drawing: to move: to approach:-pa.t drew; pa.p. drawn. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  45. To move or approach; write an order for money; practice drawing. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  46. take in, also metaphorically; "The sponge absorbs water well"; "She drew strength from the minister's words" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  47. remove the entrails of; "draw a chicken" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  48. allow a draft; "This chimney draws very well" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  49. cause to localize at one point; "Draw blood and pus" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  50. remove (a commodity) from (a supply source); "She drew $2,000 from the account"; "The doctors drew medical supplies from the hospital's emergency bank" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  51. cause to move along the ground by pulling; "draw a wagon"; "pull a sled" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  52. guide or pass over something; "He ran his eyes over her body"; "She ran her fingers along the carved figurine"; "He drew her hair through his fingers" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  53. pull back the sling of (a bow); "The archers were drawing their bows" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  54. get or derive; "He drew great benefits from his membership in the association" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  55. take liquid out of a container or well; "She drew water from the barrel" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  56. To have attractive influence; be attractive. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  57. To have a free draft, as a stove or chimney. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  58. To move as if drawn; as, to draw away. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  59. To obtain money, etc., on application. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  60. To delineate, as with a pencil; practise drawing. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  61. To unsheathe a sword. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  62. To pull along after one; to pull out; to drag; to pull up from; to suck; to attract; to inhale; to take from; to let run out; to extract; to bring on; to move gradually or slowly; to lengthen; to utter drawlingly, as a sigh; to extend, by marking or forming; to represent by lines; to represent by words; to represent in fancy; to derive; to have; to deduce; to lead by persuasion or moral influence; to induce; to persuade; to attract toward; to win; to receive or take, as from a fund; to produce, as interest; to extort; to wrest; to write in due form; to receive or gain by drawing; to stretch; to require a certain depth of water for floating; to bend; to eviscerate. To draw back, to receive back, as duties on goods for exportation. To draw in, to collect; to contract; to pull back; to entice or inveigle. To draw off, to draw from or away; to withdraw; to abstract; to draw or cause to flow from; to extract by distillation. To draw on, to allure; to persuade or cause to follow; to occasion; to invite; to bring on. To draw over, to raise, or cause to come over, as in a still; to persuade or induce to revolt from an opposing party, and join one's own. To draw out, to lengthen; to beat or hammer out; to lengthen in time; to draw off, as liquor from a cask; to extract, as the spirit of a substance; to bring forth; to pump out by questioning or address; to induce by motive; to detach; to arrange in battle. To draw together, to collect or be collected. To draw up, to raise; to lift; to form in order of battle; to compose in due form, as a writing. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  63. To haul; to raise, as water from a well; to pull along; to pull out or unsheath; to attract; to suck or inhale; to take or let out a liquid; to sketch or delineate; to have, receive, or take, as money; to pull or exert strength in drawing; to move, advance, or approach. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  64. Drawing. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  65. the act of drawing or hauling something; "the haul up the hill went very slowly" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  66. poker in which a player can discard cards and receive substitutes from the dealer; "he played only draw and stud" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  67. a golf shot that curves to the left for a right-handed golfer; "he tooks lessons to cure his hooking" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  68. a playing card or cards dealt or taken from the pack; "he got a pair of kings in the draw" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  69. anything (straws or pebbles etc.) taken or chosen at random; "the luck of the draw"; "they drew lots for it" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  70. the finish of a contest in which the score is tied and the winner is undecided; "the game ended in a draw"; "their record was 3 wins, 6 losses and a tie" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  71. a gully that is shallower than a ravine Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  72. (American football) the quarterback moves back as if to pass and then hands the ball to the fullback who is running toward the line of scrimmage Wordnet Dictionary DB
  73. flatten, stretch, or mold metal or glass, by rolling or by pulling it through a die or by stretching; "draw steel" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  74. steep; pass through a strainer; "draw pulp from the fruit" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  75. reduce the diameter of (a wire or metal rod) by pulling it through a die; "draw wire" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  76. contract; "The material drew after it was washed in hot water" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  77. bring or lead someone to a certain action or condition; "She was drawn to despair"; "The President refused to be drawn into delivering an ultimatum"; "The session was drawn to a close" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  78. select or take in from a given group or region; "The participants in the experiment were drawn from a representative population" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  79. make, formulate, or derive in the mind; "I draw a line here"; "draw a conclusion"; "draw parallels"; "make an estimate"; "What do you make of his remarks?" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  80. finish a game with an equal number of points, goals, etc.; "The teams drew a tie" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  81. suck in or take (air); "draw a deep breath"; "draw on a cigarette" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  82. move or pull so as to cover or uncover something; "draw the shades"; "draw the curtains" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  83. direct toward itself or oneself by means of some psychological power or physical attributes; "Her good looks attract the stares of many men"; "The ad pulled in many potential customers"; "This pianist pulls huge crowds". Wordnet Dictionary DB
  84. in baseball: earn or achieve a base by being walked by the pitcher; "He drew a base on balls" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  85. engage in drawing; "He spent the day drawing in the garden" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  86. represent by making a drawing of, as with a pencil, chalk, etc. on a surface; "She drew an elephant"; "Draw me a horse" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  87. write a legal document or paper; "The deed was drawn in the lawyer's office" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  88. elicit responses, such as objections, criticism, applause, etc.; "The President's comments drew sharp criticism from the Republicans"; "The comedian drew a lot of laughter" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  89. move or go steadily or gradually; "The ship drew near the shore" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  90. cause to flow; "The nurse drew blood" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  91. require a specified depth for floating; "This boat draws 70 inches" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  92. To move; to come or go; literally, to draw one's self; -- with prepositions and adverbs; as, to draw away, to move off, esp. in racing, to get in front; to obtain the lead or increase it; to draw back, to retreat; to draw level, to move up even (with another); to come up to or overtake another; to draw off, to retire or retreat; to draw on, to advance; to draw up, to form in array; to draw near, nigh, or towards, to approach; to draw together, to come together, to collect. Webster Dictionary DB
  93. The act of drawing; draught. Webster Dictionary DB
  94. A lot or chance to be drawn. Webster Dictionary DB
  95. A drawn game or battle, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  96. That part of a bridge which may be raised, swung round, or drawn aside; the movable part of a drawbridge. See the Note under Drawbridge. Webster Dictionary DB
  97. The result of drawing, or state of being drawn; Webster Dictionary DB
  98. A drawn battle, game, or the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  99. The spin or twist imparted to a ball, or the like, by a drawing stroke. Webster Dictionary DB
  100. That which is drawn or is subject to drawing. Webster Dictionary DB
  101. The act of drawing; a game left undecided. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  102. The act of drawing: anything drawn: among sportsmen, the act of forcing a fox from his cover, a badger from his hole: etc: the place where a fox is drawn. Also something designed to draw a person out to make him reveal his intentions or what he desires to conceal or keep back, or the like: a feeler. (Slang.) "This was what in modern days is called a draw. It was a guess put boldly forth as fact to elict by the young man's answer whether he had been there lately or not."-C. Reade. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  103. movable part of a bridge. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  104. An act of drawing. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  105. A tie, as in a game. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  106. The movable section of a drawbridge. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  107. The act of drawing; the lot or chance drawn; that part of a bridge which is either raised or drawn aside; the end of a game when both sides are equal or neither wins. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  108. DRAWABLE. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  109. Drew. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.

What are the misspellings for draw?

Usage examples for draw

  1. " That's where I draw the line," she said. – The Brightener by C. N. Williamson A. M. Williamson
  2. Her companions had endeavoured to draw her into the conversation. – A Question of Marriage by Mrs. George de Horne Vaizey
X