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Definitions of drill

  1. drill a hole into Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. systematic training by multiple repetitions; "practice makes perfect" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. similar to the mandrill but smaller and less brightly colored Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a tool with a sharp point and cutting edges for making holes in hard materials (usually rotating rapidly or by repeated blows) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a rotating power drill powered by an electric motor Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. train in the military, e.g., in the use of weapons Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. undergo military training or do military exercises Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. teach by repetition Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. (military) the training of soldiers to march (as in ceremonial parades) or to perform the manual of arms Wordnet Dictionary DB
  10. learn by repetition; "We drilled French verbs every day"; "Pianists practice scales" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  11. make a hole with a pointed power or hand tool; "don't drill here, there's a gas pipe"; "drill a hole into the wall"; "drill for oil" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. To pierce or bore with a drill, or a with a drill; to perforate; as, to drill a hole into a rock; to drill a piece of metal. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To train in the military art; to exercise diligently, as soldiers, in military evolutions and exercises; hence, to instruct thoroughly in the rudiments of any art or branch of knowledge; to discipline. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To practice an exercise or exercises; to train one's self. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. An instrument with an edged or pointed end used for making holes in hard substances; strictly, a tool that cuts with its end, by revolving, as in drilling metals, or by a succession of blows, as in drilling stone; also, a drill press. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. The act or exercise of training soldiers in the military art, as in the manual of arms, in the execution of evolutions, and the like; hence, diligent and strict instruction and exercise in the rudiments and methods of any business; a kind or method of military exercises; as, infantry drill; battalion drill; artillery drill. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. Any exercise, physical or mental, enforced with regularity and by constant repetition; as, a severe drill in Latin grammar. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A marine gastropod, of several species, which kills oysters and other bivalves by drilling holes through the shell. The most destructive kind is Urosalpinx cinerea. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To cause to flow in drills or rills or by trickling; to drain by trickling; as, waters drilled through a sandy stratum. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To sow, as seeds, by dribbling them along a furrow or in a row, like a trickling rill of water. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To cause to slip or waste away by degrees. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To trickle. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To sow in drills. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. A small trickling stream; a rill. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. An implement for making holes for sowing seed, and sometimes so formed as to contain seeds and drop them into the hole made. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. A light furrow or channel made to put seed into sowing. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. A row of seed sown in a furrow. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. A large African baboon (Cynocephalus leucophaeus). Webster Dictionary DB
  29. Same as Drilling. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. To entice; to allure from step; to decoy; - with on. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. A genus of the subfamily CERCOPITHECINAE, family CERCOPITHECIDAE, consisting of seven named species: P. ursinus (chacma baboon), P. cynocephalus (yellow baboon), P. papio (western or Guinea baboon), P. anubis (anubis or olive baboon), P. hamadryas (hamadryas or sacred baboon), P. sphinx (mandrill), and P. leucophaeus (drill). Some authors have recognized a separate genus for the drill and mandrill: Mandrillus. The Papio genus is geographically distributed throughout east and west Africa, Arabia, Egypt, and the Sudan. Medical Dictionary DB
  32. To pierce with a boring tool; bore; instruct thoroughly; train; sow in lines or rows. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  33. To engage in military exercises. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  34. A tool for boring or making holes in a hard substance; a machine for sowing seeds in rows; military exercise; thorough instruction, especially by means of frequent repetition. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  35. To pierce through with a revolving borer (this implies tremor, and connects DRILL with THRILL). The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  36. An instrument that bores. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  37. To exercise, e.g. soldiers or pupils. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  38. The exercising of soldiers. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  39. A row or furrow to put seed into in sowing. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  40. To sow in rows. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  41. A tool for boring; military exercise; small furrows for seed. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  42. To bore; exercise, as soldiers, or thoroughly; sow in drills. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  43. To bore, as with a drill. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  44. To train, as soldiers. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  45. To plant in drills. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  46. A boring - tool for metal. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  47. A machine for planting seeds in rows; a row so planted. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  48. Military training. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  49. A pointed instrument used for boring holes in metals or other hard substances. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  50. The act of drilling or training soldiers. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  51. An ape or baboon; a row of grain sowed by a drill-plough; a small stream now called a rill. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  52. To pierce or bore with a drill; to draw on; to drain; to exhaust or waste slowly. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  53. To teach and train raw soldiers to their duty by frequent exercise; to teach by repeated exercise or repetition of acts. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  54. To sow grain in drills. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  55. To muster for exercise. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  56. To sow in drills; to flow gently. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  57. A pointed instr. for boring holes; the act of training in military exercises. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  58. To pierce or bore with a drill; to train to, as a soldier by military exercises; to educate by repeated acts. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  59. To let corn dribble along a furrow or channel like a trickling rill of water. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  60. In agriculture, a row of grain or seed sown or planted in a furrow; the trench or channel so sown. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  61. To entice; to allure from step; to decoy; -- with on. mso.anu.edu.au
  62. dril, v.t. to bore, pierce: to make with a drill: to exercise soldiers, pupils, &c.--to sow seeds, &c., in rows.--n. an instrument for boring stone, metal, teeth, or hard substances (not wood), actuated by a kind of bow, by a brace, or otherwise: a large boring instrument used in mining: a ridge with seed or growing plants on it (turnips, potatoes, &c.): the plants in such a row: the machine for sowing the seed in drill-husbandry.--ns. DRILL'-BAR'ROW, a grain-drill driven by hand; DRILL'-HAR'ROW, a harrow for working between drills; DRILL'-HUS'BANDRY, the method of sowing seed in drills or rows; DRILL'ING-MACHINE', DRILL'ING-LATHE, DRILL'-PRESS, machines for boring with a drill or drills; DRILL'-MAS'TER, one who teaches drill, one who trains in anything, esp. in a mechanical manner; DRILL'-PLOUGH, a plough for sowing grain in drills; DRILL'-SER'GEANT, a sergeant who drills soldiers. [Prob. borrowed from Dut. drillen, to bore; dril, drille, a borer.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  63. dril, n. a species of baboon found in Western Africa, resembling the mandrill, but smaller. [A contr. of mandrill.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  64. Pointed steel &c. tool, or machine, for boring holes (vb, bore, of person or tool, with metal &c., or hole &c., as obj.; also intr., d. through, perforate); boring shell-fish; instruction or exercise in military evolutions (d.-sergeant, instructor in d., also fig.), rigorous discipline, exact routine, (vb, subject to, or undergo, such discipline; B Company will d. at 10.0 a.m.; d. him in what he is to say, in Latin Grammar). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  65. Small furrow for sowing seed in, ridge with such furrow on top, row of plants so sown; machine for furrowing, sowing, & covering seed; (vb) sow (seed) thus, plant (ground) in dd. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  66. Kind of baboon. [Welsh] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  67. Coarset willed linen or cotton fabric. [Greek] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  68. [Ger.] A coarse linen or cotton cloth. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  69. A borer. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  70. An agricultural implement. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  71. n. A pointed steel instrument, used for boring holes, particularly in metals and other hard substances; a drill-press;—an implement, for making holes for sowing seed;—a light furrow of channel made to put soldiers in the military art ; instruction and exercise in the rudiments and methods of any business. Cabinet Dictionary
  72. An instrument with which holes are bored; an ape, baboon. Complete Dictionary

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