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Definitions of drive

  1. To go off in a carriage; to be forced along; to rush and press with violence; to aim at; to aim a blow. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To impel or urge onward by force in a direction away from one, or along before one; to push forward; to compel to move on; to communicate motion to; as, to drive cattle; to drive a nail; smoke drives persons from a room. Webster Dictionary DB
  3. To urge, impel, or hurry forward; to force; to constrain; to urge, press, or bring to a point or state; as, to drive a person by necessity, by persuasion, by force of circumstances, by argument, and the like. Webster Dictionary DB
  4. To carry or; to keep in motion; to conduct; to prosecute. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. To clear, by forcing away what is contained. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To dig Horizontally; to cut a horizontal gallery or tunnel. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. Specif., in various games, as tennis, baseball, etc., to propel (the ball) swiftly by a direct stroke or forcible throw. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To urge on and direct the motions of, as the beasts which draw a vehicle, or the vehicle borne by them; hence, also, to take in a carriage; to convey in a vehicle drawn by beasts; as, to drive a pair of horses or a stage. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To pass away; - said of time. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To force along: to hurry one on: to guide, as horses drawing a carriage. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  11. To force along, or in; urge; guide, as horses in a carriage. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  12. To urge forward forcibly; impel; prosecute urgently, as a business. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  13. To convey in a carriage. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  14. To rush and press with violence; to move furiously. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To be forced along; to be impelled; to be moved by any physical force or agent; to be driven. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To go by carriage; to pass in a carriage; to proceed by directing or urging on a vehicle or the animals that draw it; as, the coachman drove to my door. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To distrain for rent. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To make a drive, or stroke from the tee. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To press forward; to aim, or tend, to a point; to make an effort; to strive; - usually with at. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To press or be moved forward with violence; travel in a carriage or motor car. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. To press forward with violence: to be forced along: to go in a carriage: to tend towards a point:-pr.p. driving; pa.t. drove; pa.p. driven. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. To rush on; be forced along; go in a carriage; tend towards. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  23. cause to move back by force or influence; "repel the enemy"; "push back the urge to smoke"; "beat back the invaders" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  24. move into a desired direction of discourse; "What are you driving at?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  25. force into or from an action or state, either physically or metaphorically; "She rammed her mind into focus"; "He drives me mad" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  26. travel or be transported in a vehicle; "We drove to the university every morning"; "They motored to London for the theater" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  27. To be impelled forcibly onward; press forward furiously; aim a blow; direct one's action. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. To ride in a carriage, or direct the animal or animals by which it is drawn. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. To impel or urge forward by force; to force; to force along or in any direction; to chase; to hunt; to cause to move forward and to direct course of; to convey in a carriage; to distress; to straiten; to urge; to press, as an argument; to prosecute; to carry on, as a trade. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. To impel or urge forward by force; to compel; to guide or regulate, as the horses in a carriage; to distress; to press; to be forced along; to rush or press with violence; to be moved by any force; to tend to; to aim at; drive is the reverse of lead. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  31. Driving. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  32. Driven. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  33. the act of applying force to propel something; "after reaching the desired velocity the drive is cut off" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  34. a journey in a vehicle driven by someone else; "he took the family for a drive in his new car" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  35. the act of driving a herd of animals overland Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  36. a hard straight return (as in tennis or squash) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  37. a mechanism by which force or power is transmitted in a machine; "a variable speed drive permitted operation through a range of speeds" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  38. (computer science) a device that writes data onto or reads data from a storage medium Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  39. the trait of being highly motivated; "his drive and energy exhausted his co-workers" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  40. a road leading up to a private house; "they parked in the driveway" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  41. (sports) a hard straight return (as in tennis or squash) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  42. a physiological state corresponding to a strong need or desire Wordnet Dictionary DB
  43. hunting: chase from cover into more open ground; "drive the game" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  44. hunting: search for game; "drive the forest" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  45. cause to function by supplying the force or power for or by controlling; "The amplifier drives the tube"; "steam drives the engines"; "this device drives the disks for the computer" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  46. excavate horizontally; "drive a tunnel" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  47. hit very hard and straight with the bat swinging more or less vertically; "drive a ball" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  48. strike with a driver, as in teeing off; "drive a golfball" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  49. cause to move rapidly by striking or throwing with force; "drive the ball far out into the field" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  50. push, propel, or press with force; "Drive a nail into the wall" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  51. compel somebody to do something, often against his own will or judgment; "She finally drove him to change jobs" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  52. proceed along in a vehicle; "We drive the turnpike to work" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  53. operate or control a vehicle; "drive a car or bus"; "Can you drive this four-wheel truck?" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  54. urge forward; "drive the cows into the barn" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  55. cause someone or something to move by driving; "She drove me to school every day"; "We drove the car to the garage" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  56. move by being propelled by a force; "The car drove around the corner" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  57. strive and make an effort to reach a goal; "She tugged for years to make a decent living"; "We have to push a little to make the deadline!"; "She is driving away at her doctoral thesis" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  58. work as a driver; "He drives a bread truck"; "She drives for the taxi company in Newark" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  59. to compel or force or urge relentlessly or exert coercive pressure on, or motivate strongly; "She is driven by her passion" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  60. A place suitable or agreeable for driving; a road prepared for driving. Webster Dictionary DB
  61. Violent or rapid motion; a rushing onward or away; esp., a forced or hurried dispatch of business. Webster Dictionary DB
  62. In type founding and forging, an impression or matrix, formed by a punch drift. Webster Dictionary DB
  63. A collection of objects that are driven; a mass of logs to be floated down a river. Webster Dictionary DB
  64. In various games, as tennis, cricket, etc., the act of player who drives the ball; the stroke or blow; the flight of the ball, etc., so driven. Webster Dictionary DB
  65. A stroke from the tee, generally a full shot made with a driver; also, the distance covered by such a stroke. Webster Dictionary DB
  66. An implement used for driving; Webster Dictionary DB
  67. A mallet. Webster Dictionary DB
  68. A tamping iron. Webster Dictionary DB
  69. A cooper's hammer for driving on barrel hoops. Webster Dictionary DB
  70. A wooden-headed golf club with a long shaft, for playing the longest strokes. Webster Dictionary DB
  71. The act of driving; a trip or an excursion in a carriage, as for exercise or pleasure; - distinguished from a ride taken on horseback. Webster Dictionary DB
  72. The act of driving or sending forward; a strong blow; a road prepared for vehicles; a trip in a carriage or motor car; an annual gathering of cattle for branding; in military use, a violent attempt to break a line of defense by throwing an army against it. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  73. An excursion in a carriage: a road for driving on: a strong or sweeping blow or impulsion: a matrix formed by a steel punch or die. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  74. DRIVER. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  75. Excursion in a carriage. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  76. The act of driving. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  77. A road for driving. driveway. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  78. A trip in a carriage. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  79. Urgent pressure, as of business. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  80. An advance of troops in mass against an enemy. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  81. A short ride for pleasure or exercise; a course on which carriages are driven. To drive away, to force to a distance; to scatter. To drive off, to compel to remove; to drive to a distance. To drive out, to expel. To drive a bargain, to haggle about terms. Drive, in all its senses, is opposed to lead, and in all cases implies forcible or violent action. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  82. A ride or excursion in a carriage; the road passed over. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  83. Drove. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.

Usage examples for drive

  1. Do you want to go and take a drive with me? – Daisy by Elizabeth Wetherell
  2. Drive in and light down. – The Covered Wagon by Emerson Hough
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