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Definitions of dust

  1. the remains of something that has been destroyed or broken up Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. cover with a light dusting of a substance; "dust the bread with flour" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. fine powdery material such as dry earth or pollen that can be blown about in the air; "the furniture was covered with dust" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. free microscopic particles of solid material; "astronomers say that the empty space between planets actually contains measurable amounts of dust" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. remove the dust from, as of furniture Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. rub the dust over a surface so as to blur the outlines of a shape; "The artist dusted the charcoal drawing down to a faint image" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. remove the dust from; "dust the cabinets" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  8. distribute loosely; "He scattered gun powder under the wagon" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. Fine, dry particles of earth or other matter, so comminuted that they may be raised and wafted by the wind; that which is crumbled too minute portions; fine powder; as, clouds of dust; bone dust. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A single particle of earth or other matter. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. The earth, as the resting place of the dead. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. The earthy remains of bodies once alive; the remains of the human body. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Figuratively, a worthless thing. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Figuratively, a low or mean condition. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. Coined money; cash. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To free from dust; to brush, wipe, or sweep away dust from; as, to dust a table or a floor. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To sprinkle with dust. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To reduce to a fine powder; to levigate. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Fine dry particles of matter; a cloud or film of such fine particles; any fine powder; the particles into which a decaying body falls; pollen; a low condition. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. To brush away dust from; cover with powder; as, to dust a cake with sugar. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. Fine particles of anything like smoke or vapor: powder: earth: the grave, where the body becomes dust: a mean condition. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. To free from dust: to sprinkle with dust. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  23. Very fine particles of any substance; earth. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  24. To free from dust; sprinkle with dust; reduce to dust. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  25. Any substance, as earth, reduced to powder. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. A dead body; remains; the grave. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. Ashes and household sweepings. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. Fine dry particles of earth or other matter that may be easily raised and wafted by the wind; a stirring as of dust with like effects; a disturbance; earth; unorganized earthy matter; the grave; a low condition; pollen. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29. To brush, wipe, or sweep away dust; to sprinkle with dust; to beat. To bite the dust, to be thrown in a contest. To throw dust in one's eyes, to confuse and mislead. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. Gold dust Webster Dictionary DB
  31. Particles of matter so fine and dry that they may be raised and scattered by the wind; fine powder; earth; mortality; death; a low or mean condition. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  32. To free from dust; to sprinkle with flour or powder. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  33. Storms of sand and dust sometimes overtake Eastern travellers. They are very dreadful, many perishing under them. Jehovah threatens to bring on the land of Israel, as a punishment for forsaking him, a rain of "powder and dust" ( Deuteronomy 28:24 ). To cast dust on the head was a sign of mourning ( Joshua 7:6 ); and to sit in dust, of extreme affliction ( Isaiah 47:1 ). "Dust" is used to denote the grave ( Job 7:21 ). "To shake off the dust from one's feet" against another is to renounce all future intercourse with him ( Matthew 10:14 ; Acts 13:51 ). To "lick the dust" is a sign of abject submission ( Psalms 72:9 ); and to throw dust at one is a sign of abhorrence ( 2 Samuel 16:13 ; Compare Acts 22:23 ). biblestudytools.com
  34. dust, n. fine particles of matter: a cloud of powdery matter present in the atmosphere: powder: earth: the grave, where the body becomes dust: a mean condition: gold-dust--hence money.--v.t. to free from dust: to sprinkle with dust.--ns. DUST'-BALL, a disease of horses, in which grain-dust forms a ball in the intestine; DUST'-BIN, a bucket, box, &c. for holding dust and rubbish; DUST'-BRAND, smut (q.v.); DUST'-BRUSH, a light brush for removing dust from walls, &c.; DUST'-CART, a cart for conveying dust and rubbish from the streets; DUST'-CONTRACT'OR, one who has made a contract to remove dust, &c., as from yards; DUST'ER, one who dusts: a cloth or brush used for removing dust; DUST'-HOLE, a dust-bin; DUST'INESS; DUST'MAN, a scavenger; DUST'-PAN, a pan or shovel for removing dust swept from the floor.--adj. DUST'Y, covered or sprinkled with dust: like dust.--ns. DUST'Y-FOOT (see PIE-POWDER); DUST'Y-MILL'ER, the auricula, from the white dust upon its leaves.--DUST A PERSON'S JACKET, to give him a drubbing.--BITE THE DUST (see BITE); DOWN WITH THE DUST, pay down the money, originally with reference to gold-dust; KICK UP A DUST, to make a stir or uproar; RAISE A DUST, to create a disturbance; THROW DUST IN A PERSON'S EYES, to delude or deceive a person. [A.S. dúst; cf. Ger. dunst, vapour, Dut. duist, meal-dust.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  35. Finely powdered earth or other matter lying on ground or on surfaces or carried about in clouds by wind (shake off the d. of one\'s feet, depart indignantly; throw d. in one\'s eyes, mislead him by misrepresentation or diverting attention from point; bite the d., fall wounded or slain); household refuse (dustbin, d.-hole, receptacles for this; dustman, scavenger who empties these); pollen; (with a) cloud of d. (what a d. !, a great d., make or raise a d.); dead person\'s remains (honoured d.; also in the d., dead); the human body, man; humiliation (humbled in, to, the d.); confusion, turmoil, excitement, row, contest, (make, raise, a d.; d. & heat, the burden of a struggle); (slang) cash; d.-brand, disease of corn, smut; d.-cloak, -coat, -gown, -wrap, -cloth, worn or put over objects to keep off d.; d. -colour, dull light brown; d.-guard, in machine, or on bicycle to protect dress; dustman, =SANDMAN; dustpan, into which d. is brushed from floor; d.-shot, smallest-sized shot. Hence dustless a. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  36. Sprinkle with d. or powder (intr., of birds, take d.-bath; d. the eyes of, deceive, take in); make dusty; sprinkle (d., powder); clear of d. by brushing, wiping, or beating (d. one\'s jacket, beat him); clear away (d. &c.), clear furniture of d. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  37. Any material, especially refuse matter, in the state of a dry, fine powder. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  38. n. [Anglo-Saxon] Very fine, dry particles of earth or other matter; powder; fine sand the earth as the resting-place of the dead; the grave;—a low condition;—gold dust; hence, money; cash;—the pollen of the anther. Cabinet Dictionary
  39. Earth or other matter reduced to small particles; the grave, the state of dissolution; mean and dejected state. Complete Dictionary

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