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Definitions of ear

  1. the externally visible cartilaginous structure of the external ear Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. fruiting spike of a cereal plant especially corn Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the sense organ for hearing and equilibrium Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. good hearing; "he had a keen ear"; "a good ear for pitch" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. attention to what is said; "he tried to get her ear" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. Same as Acroterium. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. The organ of hearing; the external ear. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. That which resembles in shape or position the ear of an animal; any prominence or projection on an object, -- usually one for support or attachment; a lug; a handle; as, the ears of a tub, a skillet, or dish. The ears of a boat are outside kneepieces near the bow. See Illust. of Bell. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. Same as Crossette. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. Privilege of being kindly heard; favor; attention. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. To take in with the ears; to hear. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. The spike or head of any cereal (as, wheat, rye, barley, Indian corn, etc.), containing the kernels. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. To put forth ears in growing; to form ears, as grain; as, this corn ears well. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To plow or till; to cultivate. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. The sense of hearing; the perception of sounds; the power of discriminating between different tones; as, a nice ear for music; - in the singular only. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. The entire organ of hearing; the outer part of that organ; the sense of hearing, or delicate perception of sounds; as, he has an ear for music; attention; that part of a cereal plant containing the flowers and seeds; as, an ear of corn. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  17. 1. The organ of hearing: composed of the external ear which includes the auricle and the external acoustic, or auditory, meatus; the middle ear, or the tympanum with its ossicles; and the internal ear, which includes the labyrinth and cochlea. 2. The pinna, or auricle. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  18. The organ of hearing. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  19. A spike, as of corn. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  20. To put forth ears, as corn. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  21. (obs.) To plough or till. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. The organ of hearing or the external part merely: the sense or power of hearing: the faculty of distinguishing sounds: attention: anything like an ear. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  23. EARED, having ears; EAR-LESS, wanting ears. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  24. The organ of hearing; hearing; attention; a spike of corn. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  25. The organ or sense of hearing; attention; heed. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. Any projecting piece, handle, etc. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. A head, as of wheat; spike of maize. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. The organ of hearing, both the external and internal part; the sense of hearing, or rather the power of distinguishing sounds and judeing of harmony; a favourable hearing; attention; manner of judging: anything like an ear, as the ears of a jar; the spike of corn. To be by the ears, to fall together by the ears, to go together by the ears, to fight or scuffle; to quarrel. To set by the ears, to make strife; to cause to quarrel. Over head and ears, up to the ears, deeply. All ear, eagerly attentive. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  29. To plough or till. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. To shoot, as an ear; to form ears, as corn. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  31. The organ of hearing; the power or faculty of readily distinguishing musical sounds; attention; heed; regard. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  32. The head or top part of corn containing seeds. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  33. To form ears, as corn. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  34. The auditory organ; the various structures among invertebrates supposed to have an auditory function; the specialized tufts of hair or feathers which are close to, or similar to an external ear or pinna ; an ear-shaped structure ; the spike of any cereal. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.
  35. [Anglo-Saxon] The auditory organ; among invertebrates, the various structures supposed to have an auditory function; the specialised tufts of hair or feathers which are close to, or similar to an external ear or pinna; an earshaped structure; the spike of grasses, usually of cereals. na
  36. used frequently in a figurative sense ( Psalms 34:15 ). To "uncover the ear" is to show respect to a person ( 1 Samuel 20:2 marg.). To have the "ear heavy", or to have "uncircumcised ears" ( Isaiah 6:10 ), is to be inattentive and disobedient. To have the ear "bored" through with an awl was a sign of perpetual servitude ( Exodus 21:6 ). biblestudytools.com
  37. The sense of hearing; the perception of sounds; the power of discriminating between different tones; as, a nice ear for music; -- in the singular only. mso.anu.edu.au
  38. [=e]r, n. a spike, as of corn.--v.i. to put forth ears.--n. EAR'-COCK'LE, a disease of wheat.--adj. EARED, of corn, having ears. [A.S. éar; Ger. ähre.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  39. [=e]r, v.t. (obs.) to plough or till.--n. EAR'ING (obs.), ploughing. [A.S. erian; cf. L. ar[=a]re, Gr. aroein.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  40. [=e]r, n. the organ of hearing, or the external part merely: the sense or power of hearing: the faculty of distinguishing sounds: attention: anything like an ear.--ns. EAR'ACHE, an ache or pain in the ear; EAR'BOB, an earring; EAR'-CAP, a covering to protect the ear from cold; EAR'DROP, an ornamental pendant hanging from the ear; EAR'DRUM, the drum or middle cavity of the ear, tympanum (q.v.).--adj. EARED, having ears.--n. EAR'-HOLE, the aperture of the ear.--adj. EAR'-KISS'ING, whispered.--n. EAR'LAP, the tip of the ear: an ear-cap.--adj. EAR'LESS, wanting ears.--ns. EAR'LOCK, a curl near the ear worn by Elizabethan dandies; EAR'MARK, a mark set on the ears of sheep whereby their owners may distinguish them: a distinctive mark.--v.t. to put an earmark on.--n. EAR'-PICK, an instrument for clearing the ear.--adj. EAR'-PIERC'ING, shrill, screaming.--ns. EAR'RING, an ornamental ring worn in the ear; EAR'-SHELL, any shell of the family Haliotidæ; EAR'SHOT, the distance at which a sound can be heard; EAR'-TRUM'PET, a tube to aid in hearing; EAR'WAX, a waxy substance secreted by the glands of the ear; EAR'WIG, an insect which was supposed to creep into the brain through the ear: a flatterer.--v.t. to gain the ear of: to bias: to torment by private importunities (A.S. éarwicga, éare, ear, wicga, earwig).--n. EAR'WITNESS, a witness that can testify from his own hearing.--ABOUT ONE'S EARS, said of a house falling, &c.; BE ALL EARS, to give every attention; GIVE EAR, to attend; GO IN AT ONE EAR AND OUT AT THE OTHER, used of words which make no permanent impression; HAVE A PERSON'S EAR, to be secure of his favourable attention; HAVE ITCHING EARS, to be desirous of hearing novelties (2 Tim. iv. 3); LEND AN EAR, to listen; OVER HEAD AND EARS, overwhelmed: deeply engrossed or involved; SET BY THE EARS, to set at strife; SPEAK IN THE EAR, to whisper; TICKLE THE EAR, to flatter; TURN A DEAF EAR, to refuse to listen; WALLS HAVE EARS, a proverbial phrase implying that there may be listeners behind the wall. [A.S. éare; cf. L. auris, Ger. ohr.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  41. Auris, Ous, ovs, Acoe, Saxon, eane, (Prov.) Lug. (F.) Oreille. The organ of audition. It is composed of a series of more or less irregular cavities, in which the sonorous rays are successively received and reflected, until they agitate the nerves which are destined to convey the impression to the brain. The ear is contained partly in the substance of the temporal bone; and a part projects externally, behind the joint of the lower jaw. It may be divided into three portions; the outer or external ear, formed by the auricle and meatus auditorius; the middle ear, comprising the cavity of the tympanum and its dependencies; and the internal ear, comprehending the three semicircular canals, the cochlea and the vestibule; which, together, constitute the osseous labyrinth. Within the cavity of this labyrioth are contained membranes having nearly the shape of the vestibule and semicircular canals, but not extending into the cochlea. These membranes form the membranous labyrinth. Between the osseous and the membranous labyrinth is situate the liquor of Cotunnius, and within the membranous labyrinth is a fluid, termed, by De Blainville, vitrine auditive, from its supposed analogy to the vitreous humour of the eye. The form of the membranous vestibule is not an exact imitation of the osseous cavity, being composed of two distinct sacs, which open into each other, -the one termed the Sacculus vestibuli; the other Sacculus Each sac contains in its interior a small mass of white calcareous matter resembling powdered chalk, which seems to be suspended in the fluid of the sacs by means of a number of nervous filaments proceeding from the auditory nerve. These are the otoconies and otolithes of Breschet. The auditory nerve is distributed to the cavities of the internal ear. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  42. [Latin] The organ of hearing. The External e. consists of the cartilaginous and cutaneous pinna and the external auditory canal, the walls of which are partly cartilaginous, partly bony. It is separated by a vibratile muco-cutaneous membrane (drum-membrane, Membrane tympani) from the middle ear. The Middle e. (Tympanum, Drum) is contained in a special cavity of the petrous part of the temporal bone. It contains the ossicles, namely (1) the Malleus, which is attached to the drum-membrane, and articulates with (2) the Incus, which in turn articulates with (3) the Stapes, which is fixed in the fenestra ovalis on the inner wall of the middle e. The cavity of the middle e. consists of a large space (atrium) below, communicating through the Eustachian tube with the naso-pharynx; a small space (attic) above, more or less shut off from the atrium and containing the body and short process of the incus and the head and neck of the malleus; and the mastoid antrum and cells, connected with the attic by a narrow passage (aditus). The middle communicates with the inner e. (vestibule) by two apertures, the fenestra rotunda, which is closed in by a vibratile membrane (Membra na tympani secundaria), and the fenestra ovalis, closed in by the foot-plate of the stapes. The Inner e., or Labyrinth, consists of the osseous vestibule, containing two membranous bags, the saccule and utricle; the three semicircular osseous canals enclosing the semicircular membranous canals which spring from the utricle; and the snail-shaped cochlea. The cavity of the cochlea is divided by a lamina, partly Dony (Lamina spiralis), partly membranous (Membrana basilaris), into two spiral canals, the Scala vestibuli communicating below with the vestibule, and Scala tympani, communicating through the fenestra rotunda with the tympanum; and the former is again divided by the oblique membrane of Reissner into two canals, the lower of which (Ductus cochlearis, Scala media) communicates inferiorly with the saccule by the canalis reuniens, and contains the organ of Corti. The latter consists of a series of several thousand rods (Cortis rods, Cortis fibres) standing side by side upon the membrana basilaris. These rods are arranged in two sets, an outer and an inner, which are inclined toward each other by their free upper extremities like the sloping sides of a roof, forming an arch (Cortis arch) which encloses a triangular canal (Cortis canal). Outside the external row of rods are three or four rows of ciliated cells (external ciliated cells, Cortis cells). Cortis organ is covered in above by Cortis membrane. The vestibule and other parts of the bony labyrinth are filled with a clear liquid ( perilymph), and the continuous series or canals formed by the membranous labyrinth is filled with Soundwaves entering the external e. set in vibration the drum-membrane and the chain of ossicles, and this vibration, being transmitted through the fenestra ovalis, produces waves in the endolymph, the effect of which is accentuated by the presence of movable calcareous particles (otoliths) contained in the walls of tne membranous labyrinth. na
  43. Organ of hearing, esp. external part of this; faculty of discriminating sound, as an e. for music; ear-shaped thing, esp. handle of pitcher; bring (storm, hornet\'s nest, &c.) about one\'s ee.; prick up one\'s ee., assume expectant attitude; I would give my ee., make any sacrifice (for a thing, to do); overhead and ee., deeply immersed in (lit. & fig.); set (persons), be, by the ee. (at variance); a word in your e. (in private); be all ee. (deeply attentive); it goes in at one e. & out at the other, it leaves no impression; give e., listen to; have a person\'s e. (favourable attention); were your ee. burning last night? (we were talking about you); sent him away with a flea in his e., told him some home truths &c.; e.-ache, pain in drum of e.; e. -mark, (n.) mark on e. of sheep &c. as sign of ownership, (fig.) mark of ownership, (v.t.) mark (sheep &c.) with this, (fig.) assign (fund &c.) to definite purpose; e.-ring (worn in lobe of ear for ornament); e.- shot, hearing-distance, as within, out of, e.- shot; e. -trumpet, tube used by persons partly deaf; e.-wax, viscid secretion in e. Hence (-)eared, earless, aa. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  44. Spike, head, of corn, containing its flowers or seeds. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  45. Organ of hearing. American pocket medical dictionary.
  46. The organ of hearing, which is divided into three parts: the first, the external e. comprises the auricle with the lobe and the external auditory canal; the second, or middle e., consists of the tympanic membrane, the cavity of the tympanum, the eustachian tube, and the mastoid antrum and cells; the third, the internal e., consists of the cochlea, the semicircular canals, and the auditory nerve with its terminal expansion in the labyrinth. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  47. [L., Gr., I plough.] Gen. xlv., 1 Sam. viii., etc. ; ploughing, any manner of preparing ground for seed. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  48. n. [Anglo-Saxon] The organ of hearing;—the sense of hearing; —the power of distinguishing sounds; musical perception or taste;—a favourable hearing; attention; regard; heed: —pl. The head or person;—parts projecting from a domestic vessel, used as handles. Cabinet Dictionary
  49. n. [Anglo-Saxon] The spike of a plant of corn or other grain. Cabinet Dictionary
  50. The whole organ of audition or hearing; that part of the ear that stands prominent; power of judging of harmony; the spike of corn, that part which contains the seeds; To fall together by the ears, to fight, to scuffle; To set by the ears, to make strife, to make to quarrel. Complete Dictionary

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