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Definitions of egg

  1. one of the two male reproductive glands that produce spermatozoa and secrete androgens; "she kicked him in the balls and got away" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. throw eggs at Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. animal reproductive body consisting of an ovum or embryo together with nutritive and protective envelopes; especially the thin-shelled reproductive body laid by e.g. female birds Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. oval reproductive body of a fowl (especially a hen) used as food Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. coat with beaten egg; "egg a schnitzel" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. A simple cell, from the development of which the young of animals are formed; ovum; germ cell. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. Anything resembling an egg in form. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. The oval or roundish body laid by domestic poultry and other birds, tortoises, etc. It consists of a yolk, usually surrounded by the white or albumen, and inclosed in a shell or strong membrane. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To urge on; to instigate; to incite Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A female germ cell extruded from the OVARY at OVULATION. Medical Dictionary DB
  11. The oval or roundish body laid by birds and certain other animals, from which their young are produced; something shaped like an egg; the germ or first principle of anything. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  12. To urge on or incite. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  13. The female sexual cell; especially that of birds and certain reptiles which is developed outside the body of the parent and which is provided with a protective shell and a mass of albuminous and fatty material designed for the nourishment of the embryo. The naked egg of mammals, developing within the body of the mother, is usually called ovum. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  14. The body formed in the females of all animals (with the exception of a few of the lowest type, which are reproduced by gemmation or division), in which, by impregnation, the development of the foetus takes place. Regarded physiologically there are three essential parts in an egg, viz. the germinal spot, or Wagnerian vesicle; the germinal, or Purkingean vesicle; and the vitellus or yolk-the first being contained in the germinal vesicle, which again is contained within the body of the yolk. The eggs of most animals lower than the bird have no more than these three parts. The eggs of birds, however, have, besides these, the white, or albumen, and the shell, which consists of a membrane coated with carbonate of lime. The yolk consists of a strong solution of albumen, in which multitudes of minute globules of oil are suspended. A hen's egg of good size weighs about 1000 grains, of which the white constitutes 600, the yolk 300, and the shell 100. Eggs of domestic fowls, and of certain wild fowls, as the plover, gulls, etc., are an important article of commerce, and furnish a wholesome, nutritious, and very pleasant article of diet. The eggs of turtles are also held in high esteem. Animals whose young do not leave the egg till after it is laid are called oviparous; those in which the eggs are retained within the parent body until they are hatched are called ovoviviparous. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  15. To instigate. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  16. A body laid by birds and various other animals, from which the young is produced. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  17. To instigate or incite; urge; commonly followed by on. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  18. A body containing the germ and food yolk, as of birds, enclosed in a membranous or shelly covering. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  19. The ovum of domestic poultry, largely used as food by all nations; a body formed in the females of birds and certain other animals, containing an embryo or foetus of the same species, or the substance from which a like animal is produced; anything like an egg. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  20. To incite. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  21. A roundish body produced by the females of birds and certain other animals, out of which a creature is produced of a like kind; the spawn of fishes, &c. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  22. To urge on; to incite. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  23. The matured germ-cell of a female plant or animal. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.
  24. [Anglo-Saxon] The matured female germ-cell; ovule. na
  25. (Heb. beytsah, "whiteness"). Eggs deserted ( Isaiah 10:14 ), of a bird ( Deuteronomy 22:6 ), an ostrich ( Job 39:14 ), the cockatrice ( Isaiah 59:5 ). In Luke 11:12 , an egg is contrasted with a scorpion, which is said to be very like an egg in its appearance, so much so as to be with difficulty at times distinguished from it. In Job 6:6 ("the white of an egg") the word for egg (hallamuth') occurs nowhere else. It has been translated "purslain" (RSV marg.), and the whole phrase "purslain-broth", i.e., broth made of that herb, proverbial for its insipidity; and hence an insipid discourse. Job applies this expression to the speech of Eliphaz as being insipid and dull. But the common rendering, "the white of an egg", may be satisfactorily maintained. biblestudytools.com
  26. eg, n. an oval body laid by birds and certain other animals, from which their young are produced: anything shaped like an egg.--ns. EGG'-APP'LE, or PLANT, the brinjal or aubergine, an East Indian annual with egg-shaped fruit; EGG'-BIRD, a sooty tern; EGG'-C[=O]'SY, a covering put over boiled eggs to keep in the heat after being taken from the pot: EGG'-CUP, a cup for holding an egg at table; EGG'ER, EGG'LER, one who collects eggs; EGG'ERY, a place where eggs are laid; EGG'-FLIP, a hot drink made of ale, with eggs, sugar, spice, &c.; EGG'-GLASS, a small sand-glass for regulating the boiling of eggs; EGG'-NOG, a drink compounded of eggs and hot beer, spirits, &c.; EGG'-SHELL, the shell or calcareous substance which covers the eggs of birds; EGG'-SLICE, a kitchen utensil for lifting fried eggs out of a pan; EGG'-SPOON, a small spoon used in eating eggs from the shell.--A BAD EGG (coll.), a worthless person; PUT ALL ONE'S EGGS INTO ONE BASKET, to risk all on one enterprise; TAKE EGGS FOR MONEY, to be put off with mere promises of payment; TEACH YOUR GRANDMOTHER TO SUCK EGGS, spoken contemptuously to one who would teach those older and wiser than himself; TREAD UPON EGGS, to walk warily, to steer one's way carefully in a delicate situation. [A.S. æg; cf. Ice. egg, Ger. ei, perh. L. ovum, Gr. [=o]on.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  27. eg, v.t. to instigate. [Ice. eggja--egg, an edge; cog. with A.S. ecg. See EDGE.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  28. Spheroidal body produced by female of birds &c. esp. of domestic fowl, containing germ of a new individual; ADDLE, WIND, e.; (fig.) in the e., in an early stage; bad e., person, scheme, that comes to no good; as sure as ee. is ee., undoubtedly; teach your grandmother to suck ee., offer advice to persons more experienced than yourself; have all your ee. in one basket, risk all on a single venture; e. & anchor, dart, tongue, (Arch.) kinds of moulding; e.-&-spoon race (in which runners carry e. in spoon); e. cleavage, process of cleavage in fertilized e.-shell; e.-cup (for holding e. boiled in shell); e.-dance, dance blindfold among ee., (fig.) intricate task; e.-flip, -nog, hot beer, cider, wine, &c., with ee. stirred in; e.-shell, shell of e., fragile thing; e.-slice, utensil for taking omelette from pan; e.-spoon, small spoon for eating boiled ee.; e.-tooth, protuberance on bill-sheath of embryo bird for cracking shell; e.-whisk, utensil for beating ee. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  29. Urge (person) on (to an act, to do). [old Norse] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  30. e.-shell china, thin delicate porcelain. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  31. An ovum; chiefly an ovum that is hatched outside the body. American pocket medical dictionary.
  32. n. [Anglo-Saxon] A spheroidal body formed in the ovary of a female oviparous animal, containing the germ of a now individual of the species within a shell or viscous membrane; — any tiling like an egg in form. Cabinet Dictionary
  33. That which is laid by feathered animals, from which their young is produced; the spawn or sperm of creatures; any thing fashioned in the shape of an egg. Complete Dictionary

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