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Definitions of element

  1. any of the more than 100 known substances (of which 92 occur naturally) that cannot be separated into simpler substances and that singly or in combination constitute all matter Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. an artifact that is one of the individual parts of which a composite entity is made up; especially a part that can be separated from or attached to a system; "spare components for cars"; "a component or constituent element of a system" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. one of four substances thought in ancient and medieval cosmology to constitute the physical universe; "the alchemists believed that there were four elements" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. the most favorable environment for a plant or animal; "water is the element of fishes" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a straight line that generates a cylinder or cone Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. the situation in which you are happiest and most effective; "in your element" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. an abstract part of something; "jealousy was a component of his character"; "two constituents of a musical composition are melody and harmony"; "the grammatical elements of a sentence"; "a key factor in her success". Wordnet Dictionary DB
  8. One of the simplest or essential parts or principles of which anything consists, or upon which the constitution or fundamental powers of anything are based. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. One of the ultimate, undecomposable constituents of any kind of matter. Specifically: (Chem.) A substance which cannot be decomposed into different kinds of matter by any means at present employed; as, the elements of water are oxygen and hydrogen. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. One of the ultimate parts which are variously combined in anything; as, letters are the elements of written language; hence, also, a simple portion of that which is complex, as a shaft, lever, wheel, or any simple part in a machine; one of the essential ingredients of any mixture; a constituent part; as, quartz, feldspar, and mica are the elements of granite. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. One out of several parts combined in a system of aggregation, when each is of the nature of the whole; as, a single cell is an element of the honeycomb. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. One of the smallest natural divisions of the organism, as a blood corpuscle, a muscular fiber. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. One of the simplest essential parts, more commonly called cells, of which animal and vegetable organisms, or their tissues and organs, are composed. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Sometimes a curve, or surface, or volume is considered as described by a moving point, or curve, or surface, the latter being at any instant called an element of the former. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. One of the terms in an algebraic expression. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. One of the necessary data or values upon which a system of calculations depends, or general conclusions are based; as, the elements of a planet's orbit. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. The simplest or fundamental principles of any system in philosophy, science, or art; rudiments; as, the elements of geometry, or of music. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. Any outline or sketch, regarded as containing the fundamental ideas or features of the thing in question; as, the elements of a plan. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. One of the simple substances, as supposed by the ancient philosophers; one of the imaginary principles of matter. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. The four elements were, air, earth, water, and fire Webster Dictionary DB
  21. the conditions and movements of the air. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. The elements of the alchemists were salt, sulphur, and mercury. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. The whole material composing the world. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. The bread and wine used in the eucharist or Lord's supper. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To compound of elements or first principles. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To constitute; to make up with elements. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. A first or main principle; one of the main parts of the physical world, as fire, water, air, etc.; natural environment, or life with which one is familiar; as, he is out of his element; ingredient; in chemistry, a substance which cannot be separated into other substances. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. 1. A simple substance, one which is incapable of being split up into other substances. 2. A cell or other indivisible anatomical structure. 3. Earth, air, fire, or water, formerly regarded as the principles of which all matter was composed. A practical medical dictionary. By Stedman, Thomas Lathrop. Published 1920.
  29. A simple substance; the last substance of an analyzed compound. Warner's pocket medical dictionary of today. By William R. Warner. Published 1898.
  30. A first principle: one of the essential parts of anything: an ingredient: the proper state or sphere of any thing or being:-pl. the rudiments of anything: (chem.) the simple bodies that have not been decomposed: among the ancients, fire, air, earth, and water, supposed to be the constituents of all things: the bread and wine used at the Communion. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  31. Elemental. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  32. First principle; simple constituent; ingredient; proper sphere. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  33. A component; constituent; ingredient. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. Rudiments. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. The bread and wine of the Lord's Supper. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. Natural agencies, as of earth, air, fire, and water. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. The natural sphere or environment. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. A form of matter which can not be decomposed by any known means. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. The first rules or principles of an art or science; rudiments; data; the bread and wine used at the Eucharist; those bodies which cannot be resolved by chemical analysis, and are therefore presumed to be simple; fire, air, earth, and water, to which some add ether, formerly supposed to constitute the world. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. First principle; one of the simple constituent parts of a thing; the proper state or sphere of a thing; outline or sketch; moving cause or principle. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  41. To compound of elements; to constitute or to make, as a first principle. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. A simple substance; the first or constitnent principle of anything; an ingredient or constituent part; the proper sphere or state of anything. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  43. The first rules or principles of any branch of knowledge; rudiments; data; an outline or sketch; the bread and wine used in the Eucharist or Lord's Supper. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  44. A substance that cannot be separated into simpler substances. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.
  45. An infinitesimal part of anything of the same nature as the entire magnitude considered; as, in a solid an element may be the infinitesimal portion between any two planes that are separated an indefinitely small distance. In the calculus, element is sometimes used as synonymous with differential. mso.anu.edu.au
  46. 1. One of the items of data in an array.2. One kind of node in an SGML, HTML, orXML document tree. An SGML element is typicallyrepresented by a start tag ("").In some SGML implementations, some tags are omissible, as with"" in HTML.The start tag can contain attributes ("<p lang="en-UK"class='stuff'>"), which are an unordered set of key-valuebindings for that element. Both the start tag and end tag foran element typically contain the "tag name" (also called the"GI" or generic identifier) for that element.In XML, an element is always represented either by anexplicit start tag and end tag, or by an empty element tag ("").Other kinds of SGML node are: a section of character data ("foo"), a comment (""), a markup declaration (""), or a processing instruction ("<?xml-stylesheet href="shop-english.xsl" type="text/xsl"?>"). foldoc_fs
  47. el'e-ment, n. a first principle: one of the essential parts of anything: an ingredient: the proper state or sphere of any thing or being: (pl.) the rudiments of learning: the bread and wine used in the Eucharist: fire, air, earth, and water, supposed by the ancients to be the foundation of everything: (chem.) the simplest known constituents of all compound substances: (astron.) those numerical quantities, and those principles deduced from astronomical observations and calculations, which are employed in the construction of tables exhibiting the planetary motions.--adj. ELEMENT'AL, pertaining to elements or first principles: fundamental: belonging to or produced by elements.--n. ELEMENT'ALISM, the theory which resolves the divinities of antiquity into the elemental powers.--adv. ELEMENT'ALLY.--adj. ELEMENT'ARY, of a single element: primary: uncompounded: pertaining to the elements: treating of first principles.--ELEMENTAL SPIRITS, beings in medieval belief who presided over the four 'elements,' living in and ruling them. [Fr.,--L. elementum, pl. elementà, first principles.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  48. A simple, ultimate constituent or principle in the human body, which forms the basis of a fibre or tissue. Also, a constituent of a compound organ. The inorganic elements are simple principles. An organic element, proximate principle or compound of organization, results from the union of certain inorganic elements. Oxygen, hydrogen, carbon, and azote, are inorganic elements; fibrin, albumen, osmazome, &e., organic elements. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  49. [Latin] One of the ultimate or primary constituents of anything; one of a number of parts, distinct in form or structure, of which anything is composed. Anatomical e., Morphological Tissue-e., a cell, fibre, or other well-defined structure which, aggregated with similar structures, forms the tissues and organs of the body. Sarcous e., see Muscle. Es of a battery, Galvanic es, the substances which by their juxtaposition form the essential parts of a battery; especially, in a galvanic cell, the substances which are immersed in the batteryfluid and form respectively the collecting and generating plates. na
  50. [Latin] In chemistry, a substance which cannot be resolved into two or more other substances differing from each other essentially in their properties. na
  51. Component part, as reduced to its ee., analysed, the ee. of national wealth, there was an e. of cant, cant was a notable e., in his style; (Chem.) any of the many substances that defy analysis; the four ee., earth, water, air, fire; one of these as a being\'s abode or sphere, as (usu. fig.) in, out of, his e.; atmospheric agencies, as war of the ee.; rudiments of learning (i.e. the A B C) or of an art or science; Euclid\'s Ee. (of Geometry). [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  52. An ultimate chemical constituent. American pocket medical dictionary.
  53. In general, a simple ultimate constituent of a compound substance, structure, or organ; also any individual part or group of parts of a structure, process, or series of phenomena. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  54. Of a galvanic battery, the substances immersed in the exciting liquid, or liquids, considered as a couple with the vessel containing them. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  55. In the pl., the rudiments of a science. Appleton's medical dictionary.
  56. (Math.) An indefinitely small portion of a curved line, of a surface, or of a solid. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  57. [L., first principles.] A substance which cannot by any known means be split up into any simpler form of matter. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  58. n. [Latin] The first or constituent part of;—the minutest part of; an atom; an ingredient;—the matter or substance which composes the world;—that which is the proper habitation of an animal; sphere; suitable position;—that which excites action; moving cause or principle;—a part of a system;—a point to be taken into account; an important part in a case; —a sum or item in a calculation:—pl. The simplest or fundamental principles of any system in philosophy, science, or art; rudiments;—that which ancient philosophy supposed to be simple and undecomposable, as the four so called elements air, earth, water, and fire;—the bread and wine used in the eucharist. Cabinet Dictionary
  59. The first; or constituent principle of any thing; the four elements, usually so called, are earth, fire, air, water, of which our world is composed; the proper habitation or sphere of any thing; an ingredient, a constituent part; the letters of any language; the lowest or first rudiments of literature or science. Complete Dictionary

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