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Definitions of encroach

  1. To enter by gradual steps or by stealth into the possessions or rights of another; to trespass; to intrude; to trench; - commonly with on or upon; as, to encroach on a neighbor; to encroach on the highway. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. To invade another's rights by stealth; invade the property of another. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  3. To seize on the rights of others: to intrude: to trespass. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4. To seize gradually on another's right; intrude; trespass. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  5. To trench on another's limits or rights; intrude; makeinroads. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  6. To Intrude, trench upon, or invade; to take possession of by gradual advances; to creep on stealthily and gradually. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  7. To invade rights or possessions of another; to take possession of what belongs to another gradually or by stealth; to pass proper bounds; to intrude. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  8. Encroachment. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  9. ENCROACHER. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  10. ENCROACHINGLY. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.

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Usage examples for encroach

  1. The only obstacle to emancipation is, therefore, removed; for nothing but well grounded fears of violence and crime can authorize a man to encroach one moment on another's freedom. – The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus by American Anti-Slavery Society
  2. There seemed little doubt but that the offenders in either case were members of the same horde; and Mr. Pillum, in his own mind, was perfectly convinced that they meant to encroach upon his trade, and destroy all the surrounding householders who were worth the trouble. – Paul Clifford, Volume 3. by Edward Bulwer-Lytton
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