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Definitions of experience

  1. go or live through; "We had many trials to go through"; "he saw action in Viet Nam" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. the accumulation of knowledge or skill that results from direct participation in events or activities; "a man of experience"; "experience is the best teacher" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the content of direct observation or participation in an event; "he had a religious experience"; "he recalled the experience vividly" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. an event as apprehended; "a surprising experience"; "that painful experience certainly got our attention" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. undergo; "The stocks had a fast run-up" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. have firsthand knowledge of states, situations, emotions, or sensations; "I know the feeling!"; "have you ever known hunger?"; "I have lived a kind of hell when I was a drug addict"; "The holocaust survivors have lived a nightmare"; "I lived through two divorces" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  7. undergo an emotional sensation; "She felt resentful"; "He felt regret" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. of mental or physical states or experiences; "get an idea"; "experience vertigo"; "get nauseous"; "undergo a strange sensation"; "The chemical undergoes a sudden change"; "The fluid undergoes shear"; "receive injuries"; "have a feeling" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. Trial, as a test or experiment. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. The effect upon the judgment or feelings produced by any event, whether witnessed or participated in; personal and direct impressions as contrasted with description or fancies; personal acquaintance; actual enjoyment or suffering. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. An act of knowledge, one or more, by which single facts or general truths are ascertained; experimental or inductive knowledge; hence, implying skill, facility, or practical wisdom gained by personal knowledge, feeling or action; as, a king without experience of war. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Personal trial and practice; knowledge gained by trial and practice; something lived through. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  13. To come to know by personal trial or feeling. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  14. Experiential. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  15. Trial, practice, proof, or test; esp. frequent trial or a series of trials; observation of a fact, or of the same fact or events happening under like circumstances; continued and varied observation; "Having broadly laid down the principle that all the materials of our knowledge come from experience, Locke goes on to explain his theory more particularly."-J. D. Morell: the knowledge gained by trial, or repeated trials, or observation; practical acquaintance with any matter by personal observation or trial of it, by feeling the effects of it, by living through it, and the like; practical wisdom taught by the changes and trials of life; "To most men experience is like the stern-lights of a ship, which illumine only the track it has passed."-Coleridge; individual or particular instance of trial or observation; "This is what distance does for us, the harsh and bitter features of this or that experience are slowly obliterated and memory begins to look on the past."- W. Black; "The like holds good with respect to the relations between sounds and vibrating objects which we learn only by a generalization of experiences."-H. Spencer: experiment. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  16. To make practical acquaintance with; to try, or prove, by use, by suffering, or by enjoyment; to have happen to or befall one; as, we all experience pain, sorrow, and pleasure; we experience good and evil; we often experience a change of sentiments and views: to train by practice; to exercise. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  17. To know by trial or endurance. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  18. Trial; knowledge gained by trial; result of observation. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  19. To undergo personally; feel. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  20. Knowledge derived from one's own action, perception, or endurance. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  21. Something undergone, enjoyed, etc. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  22. The ascertained result of a series of trials or experiments; observation of a fact or of the same facts or events happening under like circumstances; what one has felt and learned by enjoying or suffering; knowledge derived from trials, use, practice, or a series of observations. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  23. To try by use, by suffering, or by enjoyment; to know by practice or trial; to suffer. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  24. Knowledge gained by frequent trial or by experiment; practice; knowledge from observation. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  25. To be taught by practice or experiment; to know by trial. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  26. eks-p[=e]'ri-ens, n. thorough trial of: practical acquaintance with any matter gained by trial: repeated trial: long and varied observation, personal or general: wisdom derived from the changes and trials of life.--v.t. to make trial of, or practical acquaintance with: to prove or know by use: to suffer, undergo.--p.adj. EXP[=E]'RIENCED, taught by experience: skilful: wise.--adjs. EXP[=E]'RIENCELESS, having no experience; EXPERIEN'TIAL, pertaining to or derived from experience.--ns. EXPERIEN'TIALISM; EXPERIEN'TIALIST.--EXPERIENCE MEETING, a religious meeting, where those present relate their religious experiences. [Fr.,--L. experientia, from exper[=i]ri--ex, inten., and old verb per[=i]ri, to try.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  27. A knowledge of things acquired by observation. In medicine, this knowledge can be obtained both by the practitioner's own experience, and by that obtained from tradition and from books. To profit by experience requires a mind capable of appreciating the proper relations between cause and effect; and hence it happens, that false experience, Experientia fallax, is extremely common; and that a man had better, in many instances, trust to that which he has learned from others, than to his own fallacious observation. The union of accurate observation by the physician with that handed down by medical writers constitutes perfect experience, so far as it is attainable in any individual case. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  28. Experiment, Mariotte, experiment of. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  29. Actual observation of facts or events; knowledge resulting from this, whence experienced a.; event that affects one, as an unpleasant e.; fact, process, of being so affected, as I learnt by e.; (usu. pl.) state, phase, of religious emotion. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  30. Meet with, feel, undergo, (pleasure, treatment, fate, &c.); learn, find, (that, how, &c.). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  31. n. [Latin] Act of proving; frequent experiment; — personal proof or trial;—knowledge gained by trial or practice;—practical acquaintance with; personal suffering of; endurance; hardship. Cabinet Dictionary
  32. Prastice, frequent trial; knowledge gained by trial and prastice. Complete Dictionary
  33. To try, to practise; to know by practice. Complete Dictionary
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