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Definitions of eye

  1. an area that is approximately central within some larger region; "it is in the center of town"; "they ran forward into the heart of the struggle"; "they were in the eye of the storm" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. look at Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a small hole or loop (as in a needle); "the thread wouldn't go through the eye" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. the organ of sight (`peeper' is an informal term for `eye') Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. good discernment (either with the eyes or as if with the eyes); "she has an eye for fresh talent"; "he has an artist's eye" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. attention to what is seen; "he tried to catch her eye" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. the organ of sight Wordnet Dictionary DB
  8. A brood; as, an eye of pheasants. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. The organ of sight or vision. In man, and the vertebrates generally, it is properly the movable ball or globe in the orbit, but the term often includes the adjacent parts. In most invertebrates the years are immovable ocelli, or compound eyes made up of numerous ocelli. See Ocellus. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. The faculty of seeing; power or range of vision; hence, judgment or taste in the use of the eye, and in judging of objects; as, to have the eye of sailor; an eye for the beautiful or picturesque. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. The action of the organ of sight; sight, look; view; ocular knowledge; judgment; opinion. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. The space commanded by the organ of sight; scope of vision; hence, face; front; the presence of an object which is directly opposed or confronted; immediate presence. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Observation; oversight; watch; inspection; notice; attention; regard. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. That which resembles the organ of sight, in form, position, or appearance Webster Dictionary DB
  15. The spots on a feather, as of peacock. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. The scar to which the adductor muscle is attached in oysters and other bivalve shells; also, the adductor muscle itself, esp. when used as food, as in the scallop. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. The bud or sprout of a plant or tuber; as the eye of a potato. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. The center of a target; the bull's-eye. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. A small loop to receive a hook; as hooks and eyes on a dress. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. The hole through the head of a needle. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. A loop forming part of anything, or a hole through anything, to receive a rope, hook, pin, shaft, etc.; as an eye at the end of a tie bar in a bridge truss; as an eye through a crank; an eye at the end of rope. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. The hole through the upper millstone. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. That which resembles the eye in relative importance or beauty. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. Tinge; shade of color. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. To fix the eye on; to look on; to view; to observe; particularly, to observe or watch narrowly, or with fixed attention; to hold in view. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To appear; to look. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. The organ of sight; the eyeball; sight; observation; view; a small hole; bud; that which resembles an eye. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. To watch closely. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  29. Eyeless. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  30. Eyed. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  31. Eying. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  32. The organ of sight or vision, more correctly the globe or movable part of it; the power of seeing; sight; regard; aim; keenness of perception; anything resembling an eye, as the hole of a needle, loop or ring for a hook, etc. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  33. To look on; to observe narrowly; -pr.p. eying or eyeing; pa.p. eyed (id). The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  34. The organ of sight; vision; perception; observation; anything like an eye. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  35. To observe narrowly. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  36. To look at fixedly; scrutinize. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. The organ of vision; sight. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. Anything that resembles the organ of sight, as in shape, place, or office; as, the eye of a needle. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. The organ of vision, properly the globe or ball movable in the orbit; the power of vision; sight; view; countenance; face; regard; observation; watch; anything resembling the eye in form; a small hole or aperture; a small catch for a hook; a loop or ring for fastening the rigging of ships; the bud of a plant; tinge; oversight; inspection; the centre of a part. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. To fix the eye on; to look on; to view; to observe; particularly, to observe or watch narrowly. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  41. To appear. The eye of a dome, the horizontal aperture on its summit, usually covered with a lantern. The eye of a pediment, a circular window in its centre. The eye of a volute, the circle at the centre, from the circumference of which the spiral line commences The eyes of a ship, the parts which lie near the hawseholes, particularly in the lower apartments. To set the eyes on, to see; to have a sight of. To find favour in the eyes, to be graciously received and treated. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. The organ of sight or vision; sight; view; notice; observation; unusual power or delicacy of vision; a small loop or ring; a bud. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  43. To watch or keep in view; to watch narrowly. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  44. The organ of sight or vision ; one of the pigment spots in various animals and in many of the lower plants ; the bud of a tuber. A dictionary of scientific terms. By Henderson, I. F.; Henderson, W. D. Published 1920.
  45. [Anglo-Saxon] The organ of sight or vision; a pigment spot in various animals and in lower plants; the bud of a tuber. na
  46. (Heb. 'ain, meaning "flowing"), applied (1) to a fountain, frequently; (2) to colour ( Numbers 11:7 ; RSV, "appearance," marg. "eye"); (3) the face ( Exodus 10:5 Exodus 10:15 ; Numbers 22:5 Numbers 22:11 ), in Numbers 14:14 , "face to face" (RSV marg., "eye to eye"). "Between the eyes", i.e., the forehead ( Exodus 13:9 Exodus 13:16 ). The expression ( Proverbs 23:31 ), "when it giveth his colour in the cup," is literally, "when it giveth out [or showeth] its eye." The beads or bubbles of wine are thus spoken of. "To set the eyes" on any one is to view him with favour ( Genesis 44:21 ; Job 24:23 ; Jeremiah 39:12 ). This word is used figuratively in the expressions an "evil eye" ( Matthew 20:15 ), a "bountiful eye" ( Proverbs 22:9 ), "haughty eyes" ( (6:17 marg.), "wanton eyes" ( Isaiah 3:16 ), "eyes full of adultery" ( 2 Peter 2:14 ), "the lust of the eyes" ( 1 John 2:16 ). Christians are warned against "eye-service" ( Ephesians 6:6 ; Colossians 3:22 ). Men were sometimes punished by having their eyes put out ( 1 Samuel 11:2 ; Samson, Judges 16:21 ; Zedekiah, 2 Kings 25:7 ). The custom of painting the eyes is alluded to in 2 Kings 9:30 , RSV; Jeremiah 4:30 ; Ezekiel 23:40 , a custom which still prevails extensively among Eastern women. biblestudytools.com
  47. (The practice of painting the eyelids to make the eyes look large, lustrous and languishing is often alluded to in the Old Testament, and still extensively prevails among the women of the East, and especially among the Mohammedans. Jezebel, in ( 2 Kings 9:30 ) is said to have prepared for her meeting with Jehu by painting her face, or, as it reads in the margin, "put her eyes in paint." See also ( Ezekiel 23:40 ) A small probe of wood, ivory or silver is wet with rose-water and dipped in an impalpable black powder, and is then drawn between the lids of the eye nearly closed, and leaves a narrow black border, which is though a great ornament. --ED.) biblestudytools.com
  48. [=i], n. (obs.) a brood. [For nye, neye; a neye=an eye. See EYAS.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  49. [=i], n. the organ of sight or vision, more correctly the globe or movable part of it: the power of seeing: sight: regard: aim: keenness of perception: anything resembling an eye, as the hole of a needle, loop or ring for a hook, &c.: the seed-bud of a potato: (pl.) the foremost part of a ship's bows, the hawse-holes.--v.t. to look on: to observe narrowly.--v.i. (Shak.) to appear:--pr.p. ey'ing or eye'ing; pa.p. eyed ([=i]d).--ns. EYE'-BALL, the ball, globe, or apple of the eye; EYE'-BEAM, a glance of the eye; EYE'BRIGHT, a beautiful little plant of the genus Euphrasia, formerly used as a remedy for diseases of the eye (see EUPHRASY); EYE'BROW, the hairy arch above the eye.--v.t. to provide with artificial eyebrows.--adj. EYE'BROWLESS, without eyebrows.--p.adj. EYED, having eyes: spotted as if with eyes.--ns. EYE'-DROP (Shak.), a tear; EYE'-FLAP, a blinder on a horse's bridle; EYE'-GLANCE, a quick look; EYE'GLASS, a glass to assist the sight, esp. such as stick on the nose by means of a spring: the eye-piece of a telescope and like instrument: (Shak.) the lens of the eye; EYE'LASH, the line of hairs that edges the eyelid.--adj. EYE'LESS, without eyes or sight: deprived of eyes: blind.--ns. EYE'LET, EYE'LET-HOLE, a small eye or hole to receive a lace or cord, as in garments, sails, &c.: a small hole for seeing through: a little eye.--v.i. to make eyelets.--ns. EYE'LIAD, obsolete form of oeillade; EYE'LID, the lid or cover of the eye: the portion of movable skin by means of which the eye is opened or closed at pleasure; EYE'-[=O]'PENER, something that opens the eyes literally or figuratively, a startling story: a drink, esp. in the morning; EYE'-PIECE, the lens or combination of lenses at the eye-end of a telescope; EYE'-PIT, the socket of the eye; EYE'-SALVE, salve or ointment for the eyes; EYE'-SERV'ANT, a servant who does his duty only when under the eye of his master; EYE'-SERV'ICE, service performed only under the eye or inspection of an employer: formal worship; EYE'-SHOT, the reach or range of sight of the eye: a glance; EYE'SIGHT, power of seeing: view: observation; EYE'SORE, anything that is offensive to the eye or otherwise; EYE'-SPLICE, a kind of eye or loop formed by splicing the end of a rope into itself; EYE'-SPOT, a spot like an eye.--adj. EYE'-SPOT'TED (Spens.), marked with spots like eyes.--ns. EYE'-STONE, a small calcareous body used for removing substances from under the eyelid; EYE'-STRING, the muscle which raises the eyelid; EYE'-TOOTH, one of the two canine teeth of the upper jaw, between the incisors and premolars; EYE'-WA'TER, water flowing from the eye: a lotion for the eyes; EYE'-WINK (Shak.), a rapid lowering and raising of the eyelid: a glance: the time of a wink; EYE'-WIT'NESS, one who sees a thing done.--EYE FOR EYE, lex talionis (Ex. xxi. 24); EYE OF DAY, the sun.--ALL MY EYE (slang) unreal; BE ALL EYES, to give all attention; BE A SHEET IN THE WIND'S EYE, to be intoxicated; CLAP, LAY, SET, EYES ON (coll.), to see; CRY ONE'S EYES OUT, to weep bitterly; CUT ONE'S EYE-TOOTH, to cease to be a child: to be shrewd; GIVE AN EYE TO, to attend to; GREEN EYE, jealousy; HAVE AN EYE TO, to contemplate: to have regard to; IN EYE, in sight; IN ONE'S MIND'S EYE, in contemplation; IN THE EYES OF, in the estimation, opinion, of; IN THE WIND'S EYE, against the wind; KEEP ONE'S EYE ON, to observe closely: to watch; MAKE A PERSON OPEN HIS EYES, to cause him astonishment; MAKE EYES AT, to look at in an amorous way: to ogle; MIND YOUR EYE (slang), take care; MY EYE! a mild asseveration; NAKED EYE (see NAKED); OPEN A PERSON'S EYES, to make him see: to show him something of which he is ignorant; PIPE, or PUT THE FINGER IN, THE EYE, to weep; SEE EYE TO EYE, from Is. lii. 8, but used in the sense of 'to think alike;' SEE WITH HALF AN EYE, to see without difficulty; UNDER THE EYE OF, under the observation of; UP TO THE EYES, deeply engaged. [A.S. éage; cf. Goth. augo, Ger. auge, Dut. oog, Ice. auga.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  50. The eye is the immediate organ of vision. It is seated in the orbit, while its dependencies, called by Haller Tutamina Oculi, occupy the circumference of the cavity, and are composed of the eyebrows, the eyelids, cilia, glands of Meibomius, &c. The Ball, Globe, or Bulb of the Eye, Bulbus Oculi, is covered anteriorly by the tunica conjunctiva; is moved by six muscles, four straight, two oblique, and is constituted of membranes, as the sclerotic, cornea, choroid, tunics Jacobi, retina, iris, hyaloid, and, in the foetus, the membrana pupillaris; and of fluids, called Humours, or Media,-the aqueous, crystalline, and vitreous. The eyeball is invested with a membranous tunic which separates it from the other structures of the orbit, and forms a smooth, hollow surface, by which its motions are facilitated. This investment has been called cellular capsule of the eye, ocular capsule, tunica vaginalis oculi, vaginal coat, and submusicular fascia of the eye. The vessels of the eye proceed from the ophthalmic artery. The nerves, except the optic, are chiefly furnished from the ophthalmic ganglion. The following are the dimensions, &c., of the organ, on the authority of Petit, Young, Gordon. Medical Lexicon. A Dictionary of Medical Science
  51. [Latin] The organ of sight. It consists of a spheroidal capsule composed of a tough white fibrous membrane, the sclerotic, in the anterior part of which is fitted the segment of a smaller spheroid, bounded by a transparent membrane, the cornea (q.v. ). The space behind the cornea forms the anterior chamber, which is bounded behind by the iris, and communicates through a central aperture in the latter (the pupil) with the posterior chamber. The latter is bounded behind by the crystalline lens (see Lens) and the suspensory ligament (zonula) of the latter, which is attached by the ciliary processes and ciliary muscles to the sclero-corneal junction. Both anterior and posterior chambers are filled with a watery liquid, the aqueous humor. Posterior to the lens is the vitreous chamber, filled with the transparent gelatinous vitreous humor. Lining the inner surface of the sclerotic in the course of the vitreous chamber is the vascular pigmented coat, the chorioid. The chorioid, ciliary body (composed of ciliary processes and ciliary muscle), and iris form the middle coat of the e., or uvea, and are concerned in maintaining the nutrition of the e., in effecting accommodation, and in acting as a diaphragm, and so preventing the scattering of the rays of light (see Chorioid, Ciliary, and Iris). Lining the inner surface of the chorioid (and, in a specially modified form, also lining the ciliary body and iris) is the retina, a membrane which contains the percipient elements (rods and cones) and the nerve-fibres which conduct the sensory impressions to the brain (see Retina). The nerve-fibres unite to form the optic disc, or beginning of the optic nerve. The front of the e. is covered by conjunctiva, which in a specially modified form is continued over the cornea. The conjunctiva is kept moist by the tears, which are secreted by the lachrymal gland and are carried away by the lachrymal duct. The cornea, aqueous, lens, and vitreous constitute the refractive media of the e. and act to focus the rays of light upon the retina, so as to produce a sharp image of external objects there. The eye is moved by the ocular muscles. Diagrammatic e., Schematic e. (of Listing), a dioptric system consisting of two refracting surfaces (one representing the cornea, the other the anterior surface of the lens), used as a means of calculating the course of light-rays in the natural e. Reduced e. (of Donders), a schematic e. in which the two refracting surfaces are replaced by one (representing the cornea). Pink e. an acute epidemic conjunctivitis, due to Bacillus conjunctivitidis. na
  52. Organ of sight; iris of this, as blue, brown, ee.; region of the ee., as BLACK e.; e. of day, sun; EVIL e.; in the wind\'s e. (direction of the wind); (Mil.) ee. right, left, front, (turn them thus); mind your e., take care; (contempt.) pipe, put one\'s finger in, one\'s e., weep; beam, mote, in one\'s e. (Matt. vii. 3); e. for e., retaliation (Exod. xxi. 24); clap, set, ee. on, behold; be all ee., watch intently; up to the ee., deeply (engaged), as up to the ee. in work, mortgaged up to the ee.; made him open his ee. (stare with astonishment); wipe the e. of (shooter), kill game he has missed; all my e. (& Betty Martin), humbug, nonsense; my eye (s)!, int. expr. astonishment; lose an e., (often) lose the sight of it; if you had half an e. (were not wholly blind or dull); saw with half an e. (at a glance); the NAKED e.; have an e. to, have as one\'s object; with an e. (a view) to; keep an e. on, keep watch on (lit. & fig.); have an e. for (a due sense of) proportion &c.; in the ee. (judgement) of; in the e. (from the point of view) of the law; in the mind\'s e., in anticipation or imagination; see e. to e., agree entirely (with); view with a friendly, jealous, e. (with such feelings); throw DUST in the ee. of; make ee. (look amorously) at; cast SHEEP\'s ee.; thing like an e., as spot on peacock\'s tail, e. of needle &c. (hole for thread &c.), hook& e. (kind of fastening for dress), loop of cord or rope, leaf bud of potato; BULL s-e.; glass e. (artificial, of glass); APPLE of the e.; eyeball, pupil of the e., e. within lids& socket; e.-bolt, bolt, bar, with e. at end for hook &c.; eyebright (also euphrasy), plant formerly used to cure weak eyes; eyebrow, fringe of hair over e.; e.-glass, lens for assisting defective sight, (pl.) pair of these held in position by hand or by spring on nose (cf. SPECTACLE); eyehole, hole containing e., hole to look through; eyelash, hair, row of hairs, on edge of eyelid; eyelid, upper or lower cover of e., (fig.) hang on by the eyelids, have only slight hold; e.-opener, enlightening or surprising circumstance; eyepiece, lens (es) at e.- end of telescope &c.; e.-servant (working properly only under employer\'s e.); e.-service (performed only thus); eyeshot, seeing distance, as beyond, in, out of, eyeshot (of); eyesight, power, faculty, of seeing; eyesore, ugly mark, (fig.) cause of annoyance or disgust; e.-splice (made by turning up end of rope& interlacing its strands with those of upper part); eyestrings, muscles, nerves, tendons, of e.; e. -tooth (canine, just under or next to e., in upper or lower jaw); eyewater, tears, lotion for e., aqueous or vitreous humours of e.; eyewitness, one who can bear witness from his own observation. Hence (-)eyed, eyeless, aa. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  53. Observe, watch, (jealously, narrowly, with disgust, ASKANCE, &c.). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  54. his ee. are bigger than his belly (said of person who has helped himself to more than he can eat); e.-bath, -cup, small glass for applying lotion &c. to e.; e.-wash, lotion for e., (slang) blarney. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  55. The organ of vision. American pocket medical dictionary.
  56. The organ of vision, situated in the orbit. It consists of the eyeball, bulb or globe of the eye, the prolongation of the optic nerves, and the six extrinsic muscles, four straight and two oblique. It is a spherical body, and consists of three tunics; 1st. cornea and sclera; 2d. iris, ciliary processes, and choroid; 3d. retina. Within these tunics are contained three refracting media, the aqueous humor, lens and capsule, and vitreous humor. The cornea and sclera are fibrous in structure and form the outer coat; the middle coat, formed of iris, ciliary processes, and choroid, is mainly a muscular, vascular, and pigmented coat, while the retina is mainly a nervous structure, being an expansion of the optic nerve fibers [B. N. A] Appleton's medical dictionary.
  57. (Naut.) The loop of a shroud or stay placed over the mast. A collar generally. Eyes of a ship, or E. of her, the foremost part in the bows, the hawse-holes. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  58. n. [Anglo-Saxon] The organ of sight or vision;—sight; view; perception; — position of the organ of vision; face; front; presence; —appearance of the organ of vision; look; countenance;—act of seeing; observation; inspection; notice; — power of seeing; extent, range, or delicacy of vision; —mental view; estimate; judgment; — the small hole in the end of a needle; — a catch for a hook; the spots on a feather, as of a peacock; — the bud or sprout of a plant or root;—the centre of a target; — that part of a loop or stay by which it is attached to, or suspended from, any thing; — that which resembles the organ of sight in relative importance or beauty. Cabinet Dictionary
  59. Plural Eyne, now Eyes. The organ of vision; aspect, regard; notice, attention, observation; fight, view; any thing formed like an eye; any small perforation; a small catch into which a hook goes; bud of a plant; a small shade of colour. Complete Dictionary
  60. To watch, to keep in view. Complete Dictionary
  61. To appear, to show, to bear an appearance. Complete Dictionary

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