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Definitions of fable

  1. a short moral story (often with animal characters) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. a deliberately false or improbable account Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a story about mythical or supernatural beings or events Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. A Feigned story or tale, intended to instruct or amuse; a fictitious narration intended to enforce some useful truth or precept; an apologue. See the Note under Apologue. Webster Dictionary DB
  5. The plot, story, or connected series of events, forming the subject of an epic or dramatic poem. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. Any story told to excite wonder; common talk; the theme of talk. Webster Dictionary DB
  7. Fiction; untruth; falsehood. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To compose fables; hence, to write or speak fiction ; to write or utter what is not true. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To feign; to invent; to devise, and speak of, as true or real; to tell of falsely. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. A fictitious tale; an untruth; a story intended to teach a useful or moral truth, in which, usually, animals talk and act like human beings. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  11. To pretend; to tell of falsely. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  12. A feigned story or tale intended to instruct or amuse; the plot or series of events in an epic or dramatic poem; fiction; a falsehood. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  13. To feign; to invent. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  14. A fictitious story; fiction embodying a general truth. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  15. A fictitious story embodying a moral, as where animals are the speakers; any fiction; legend; myth. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  16. A short tale or story intended to instruct or amuse, the incidents of which are improbable; an idle story; a falsehood. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  17. To write fiction; to tell falsehoods; to feign. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  18. A fable is a narrative in which being irrational, and sometimes inanimate, are, for the purpose of moral instruction, feigned to act and speak with human interests and passions. --Encyc. Brit. The fable differs from the parable in that -- 1. The parable always relates what actually takes place, and is true to fact, which the fable is not; and 2. The parable teaches the higher heavenly and spiritual truths, but the fable only earthly moralities. Of the fable, as distinguished from the parable [PARABLE], we have but two examples in the Bible: 3. That of the trees choosing their king, addressed by Jotham to the men of Shechem, ( Judges 9:8-15 ) 4. That of the cedar of Lebanon and the thistle, as the answer of Jehoash to the challenge of Amaziah. ( 2 Kings 14:9 ) The fables of false teachers claiming to belong to the Christian Church, alluded to by writers of the New Testament, ( 1 Timothy 1:4 ; 4:7 ; Titus 1:14 ; 2 Peter 1:16 ) do not appear to have had the character of fables, properly so called. biblestudytools.com
  19. applied in the New Testament to the traditions and speculations, "cunningly devised fables", of the Jews on religious questions ( 1 Timothy 1:4 ; 4:7 ; 2 Tim 4:4 ; Titus 1:14 ; 2 Pet 1:16 ). In such passages the word means anything false and unreal. But the word is used as almost equivalent to parable. Thus we have (1) the fable of Jotham, in which the trees are spoken of as choosing a king ( Judges 9:8-15 ); and (2) that of the cedars of Lebanon and the thistle as Jehoash's answer to Amaziah ( 2 Kings 14:9 ). biblestudytools.com
  20. f[=a]'bl, n. a narrative in which things irrational, and sometimes inanimate, are, for the purpose of moral instruction, feigned to act and speak with human interests and passions: any tale in literary form, not necessarily probable in its incidents, intended to instruct or amuse: the plot or series of events in an epic or dramatic poem: a fiction or myth: a ridiculous story, as in 'old wives' fables,' a falsehood: subject of common talk.--v.i. to tell fictitious tales: (obs.) to tell falsehoods.--v.t. to feign: to invent.--p.adj. F[=A]'BLED, mythical.--n. F[=A]'BLER, a writer or narrator of fictions.--adj. FAB'ULAR.--v.i. FAB'UL[=I]SE, to write fables, or to speak in fables.--ns. FAB'ULIST, one who invents fables; FABULOS'ITY, FAB'ULOUSNESS.--adj. FAB'ULOUS, feigned, false: related in fable: immense, amazing.--adv. FAB'ULOUSLY. [Fr. fable--L. fabula, f[=a]ri, to speak.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  21. Story, esp, of supernatural character, not founded on fact; (collect.) myths, legendary tales; idle talk (old wives ff.); false statement, lie; thing only supposed to exist; short story, esp. with animals for characters, conveying a moral, apologue; plot of play &c. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  22. (archaic& poet.). Romance, tell fictitious tales, whence fabler n.; state fictitiously; (p.p.) celebrated in f., legendary, fictitious. [old French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  23. n. [Latin] A fictitious story or tale intended to enforce some useful truth or precept; an apologue;— plot of an epic or dramatic poem;—fiction; falsehood. Cabinet Dictionary
  24. A feigned story intended to enforce some moral precept; a fiction in general; the series or contexture of events which constitute a poem; a lye. Complete Dictionary
  25. To feign, to write not truth but fiction; to tell falsehoods. Complete Dictionary
  26. To feign, to tell a falsity. Complete Dictionary

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