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Definitions of fancy

  1. imagine; conceive of; see in one's mind; "I can't see him on horseback!"; "I can see what will happen"; "I can see a risk in this strategy" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. have a fancy or particular liking or desire for; "She fancied a necklace that she had seen in the jeweler's window" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. fancy was held by Coleridge to be more casual and superficial than imagination Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. something many people believe that is false; "they have the illusion that I am very wealthy" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a predisposition to like something; "he had a fondness for whiskey" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. not plain; decorative or ornamented; "fancy handwriting"; "fancy clothes" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. To love. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. The faculty by which the mind forms an image or a representation of anything perceived before; the power of combining and modifying such objects into new pictures or images; the power of readily and happily creating and recalling such objects for the purpose of amusement, wit, or embellishment; imagination. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. An image or representation of anything formed in the mind; conception; thought; idea; conceit. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. An opinion or notion formed without much reflection; caprice; whim; impression. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. Inclination; liking, formed by caprice rather than reason; as, to strike one's fancy; hence, the object of inclination or liking. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. That which pleases or entertains the taste or caprice without much use or value. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. A sort of love song or light impromptu ballad. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To figure to one's self; to believe or imagine something without proof. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To form a conception of; to portray in the mind; to imagine. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To have a fancy for; to like; to be pleased with, particularly on account of external appearance or manners. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To believe without sufficient evidence; to imagine (something which is unreal). Webster Dictionary DB
  18. Adapted to please the fancy or taste; ornamental; as, fancy goods. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Extravagant; above real value. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To imagine; take a liking to; be pleased with. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. To imagine something without proof or grounds for so doing; suppose. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  22. Ornamental; not plain; based on imagination; elegant; above actual worth; as, a fancy price. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  23. Idea; imagination; notion; liking; caprice; pet pursuit. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  24. Fancied. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  25. Fancying. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  26. That faculty of the mind by which it recalls, represents, or makes to appear past images or impressions; an image or representation thus formed in the mind; an unreasonable or capricious opinion; a whim; capricious inclination or liking. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  27. Pleasing to, or guided by fancy or caprice. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  28. To portray in the mind; to imagine; to have a fancy or liking for; to be pleased with; -pr.p. fancying; pa.p. fancied. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  29. Imagination; caprice; notion; liking. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  30. Pleasing, or created by, fancy. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  31. To imagine; be pleased with. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  32. To suppose; conceive in the fancy; have a notion of; form a fancy; imagine; take a liking to. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. Pertaining to or proceeding from fancy. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  34. The power or act of forming mental images at random; imagination in its lower form. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  35. A visionary notion; vagary. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. A liking; that which one likes; a pet pursuit; hobby; fad. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. Merely pleasing to the taste or fancy. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  38. The faculty which the mind has of forming to itself images or representations of things at pleasure, often synonymous with imagination; fantasy; the resulting image or representation; an opinion or notion; taste; conception; inclination; liking; conceit; whim; something that pleasea or entertains without real use or value. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  39. To portray in the mind; to conceive a liking for; to be pleased with. The fancy, sporting characters. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  40. To believe or suppose. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  41. An image or representation formed in the mind at pleasure, but not always connected with reason or practicability; a false notion; a liking; a conceit or whim. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  42. Elegant; ornamental. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  43. To figure to one's self; to imagine; to like; to be pleased with. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  44. fan'si, n. that faculty of the mind by which it recalls, represents, or makes to appear past images or impressions: an image or representation thus formed in the mind: an unreasonable or capricious opinion: a whim: capricious inclination or liking: taste: (Shak.) love.--adj. pleasing to, or guided by, fancy or caprice: elegant or ornamental.--v.t. to portray in the mind: to imagine: to have a fancy or liking for: to be pleased with: to breed animals:--pr.p. fan'cying; pa.p. fan'cied.--p.adj. FAN'CIED, formed or conceived by the fancy: imagined.--n. FAN'CIER, one who has a special liking for anything, or who keeps a special article for sale: one who is governed by fancy.--adj. FAN'CIFUL, guided or created by fancy: imaginative: whimsical: wild.--adv. FAN'CIFULLY.--n. FAN'CIFULNESS.--adj. FAN'CILESS, destitute of fancy.--ns. FAN'CY-BALL, a ball at which fancy-dresses in various characters are worn; FAN'CY-DRESS, dress arranged according to the wearer's fancy, to represent some character in history or fiction; FAN'CY-FAIR, a special sale of fancy articles for some charitable purpose.--adj. FAN'CY-FREE (Shak.), free from the power of love.--n.pl. FAN'CY-GOODS, fabrics of variegated rather than simple pattern, applied generally to articles of show and ornament.--n. FAN'CY-MONG'ER (Shak.), one who deals in tricks of imagination.--adj. FAN'CY-SICK (Shak.), of distempered mind, love-sick.--ns. FAN'CY-STITCH, a more intricate and decorative stitch than plain-stitch; FAN'CY-STROKE (billiards), an unusual stroke, or one made to show off one's skill; FAN'CY-WORK, ornamental needlework.--THE FANCY, sporting characters generally, esp. pugilists: pugilism. [Contracted from fantasy.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  45. Delusion, unfounded belief; faculty of calling up things not present, of inventing imagery; mental image; arbitrary supposition; caprice, a whim; individual taste, inclination, (take a f. to, for; catch the f. of, please); the f., those who have a certain hobby, \'-fanciers, esp. the patrons of boxing; art of breeding animals with certain points of excellence; f.-free, not in love. (adj.; not pred.) ornamental, not plain, (f. bread; f. dress, masquerade costume, so f.-d. or f, ball; f. work, ornamental sewing &c.; f. fair, bazaar for sale of f. goods); (of flowers &c.) particoloured; capricious, whimsical, extravagant, (at a f. price; f. franchise, based on complicated or arbitrary qualifications; f. dog, pigeon, &c., bred for particular points of beauty &c.); based on imagination, not fact (f. picture); f. man, sweetheart, (slang) man living on earnings of a prostitute. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  46. Picture to oneself, conceive, imagine, (f. oneself dead; f. a blue dahlia; f. him to be here, that he is here; imperat. as excl. of surprise, fancy!, f. his believing it!); be inclined to suppose, rather think; (colloq.) have good conceit of (oneself, one\'s game &c.); take a f. to, like; breed, grow, (animals, plants) with attention to certain points. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  47. n. [Greek] Imagination; conceptive faculty; idealization; — power by which the mind forms to itself images or representations of outward things, persons, or scenes;—mental power of recalling and reproducing images or ideas; — faculty of expressing such images or ideas in literary or artistic form; taste;—notion; inclination; liking whim; caprice; humour; —a vain or false idea;—something that pleases or entertains without real value. Cabinet Dictionary
  48. Imagination, the power by which the mind forms to itself images and representations; an opinion bred rather by the imagination than the reason; inclination, liking; caprice, humour, whim; frolick, idle scheme, vagary. Complete Dictionary
  49. To imagine, to believe without being able to prove. Complete Dictionary
  50. To pourtray in the mind, to imagine; to like, to be pleased with. Complete Dictionary

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