Spellcheck.net

Definitions of fare

  1. proceed or get along; "How is she doing in her new job?"; "How are you making out in graduate school?"; "He's come a long way" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. an agenda of things to do; "they worked rapidly down the menu of reports" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. the food and drink that are regularly consumed Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. a paying (taxi) passenger Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. the sum charged for riding in a public conveyance Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. eat well Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. To go; to pass; to journey; to travel. Webster Dictionary DB
  8. To be in any state, or pass through any experience, good or bad; to be attended with any circummstances or train of events, fortunate or unfortunate; as, he fared well, or ill. Webster Dictionary DB
  9. To be treated or entertained at table, or with bodily or social comforts; to live. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. To behave; to conduct one's self. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. A journey; a passage. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. The price of passage or going; the sum paid or due for conveying a person by land or water; as, the fare for crossing a river; the fare in a coach or by railway. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. Ado; bustle; business. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. Condition or state of things; fortune; hap; cheer. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. Food; provisions for the table; entertainment; as, coarse fare; delicious fare. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. The person or persons conveyed in a vehicle; as, a full fare of passengers. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. The catch of fish on a fishing vessel. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To happen well, or ill; - used impersonally; as, we shall see how it will fare with him. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To be in any state, either good or ill; be entertained with food; live; succeed. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. The sum paid for a journey by rail, etc.; a person conveyed for hire in a vehicle; provisions of a table. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. To get on or succeed; to happen well or ill to; to feed. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  22. (orig.) A course or passage; the price of passage; food or provisions for the table. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  23. Price of passage; food. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  24. To get on or succeed; to be in any state; to feed. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  25. To be in any state; get on; happen; turn out; be provided as regards food and drink. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  26. Passage - money. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  27. A passenger. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. Food and drink; diet; eatables. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. The price of passage or the sum for conveying a person by land and water; food; provisions of the table; the person conveyed in a vehicle. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  30. To be in any state, good or bad; to feed; to be entertained; to succeed; to happen well or ill; to go; to pass or move on. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  31. The price or sum paid for conveyance by land or water; a passenger. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  32. To be in any state, good or bad; to feed; to be entertained; to happen. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  33. Prepared food; entertainment. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  34. A voyage or passage by water; also the money paid for a passage either by laml or by water. Cowell.The price of passage, or the sum paid or to be paid for carrying a passenger. Chase v. New York Cent. R. Co., 20 N. Y. 52G. thelawdictionary.org
  35. To happen well, or ill; -- used impersonally; as, we shall see how it will fare with him. mso.anu.edu.au
  36. It signifies a voyage or passage; in its modern application, it is the money paid for a passage. 1 Bouv. Inst. n. 1036. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  37. f[=a]r, v.i. to get on or succeed: to happen well or ill to: to be in any particular state, to be, to go on: to feed.--n. the price of passage-- (orig.) a course or passage: those conveyed in a carriage: food or provisions for the table.--interj. FAREWELL', may you fare well! a wish for safety or success.--n. well-wishing at parting: the act of departure.--adj. parting: final. [A.S. faran; Ger. fahren.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  38. 1. Cost of passenger\'s conveyance, passage-money; passenger in hired vehicle. 2. FOOD provided (usu. good, bad, plentiful, &c., f.; BILL of f.). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  39. Journey, go, travel, (poet.; so f. forth, start); happen, turn out, (how fares it?); get on well, ill, &c., have such luck; be entertained, be fed or feed oneself, well &c. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  40. n. Price of passage by land or water; — food; provisions for the table. Cabinet Dictionary
  41. To go, to pass, to travel; to be in any state good or bad; to happen to any one well or ill; to feed, to eat, to be entertained. Complete Dictionary
  42. Price of passage in a vehicle by land or by water; food prepared for the table provisions. Complete Dictionary

What are the misspellings for fare?

X