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Definitions of fear

  1. To be apprehensive of evil; to be afraid; to doubt. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  2. To be apprehensive or afraid of; be fearful or afraid; venerate; revere. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  3. To regard with apprehension; dread. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  4. To regard with fear; to expect with alarm; (B.) to stand in awe of; to venerate; (obs.) to terrify; to make afraid. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  5. To be in apprehension of evil; to be afraid; to feel anxiety on account of some expected evil. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To be in dread; feel anxiety. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  7. be afraid or feel anxious or apprehensive about a possible or probable situation or event; "I fear she might get aggressive" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. regard with feelings of respect and reverence; consider hallowed or exalted or be in awe of; "Fear God as your father"; "We venerate genius" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. be uneasy or apprehensive about; "I fear the results of the final exams" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. be sorry; used to introduce an unpleasant statement; "I fear I won't make it to your wedding party" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. To regard with fear; to anticipate with fear; to have a reverential awe of; to suspect; to terrify; to drive away by fear. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  12. To feel an uneasy emotion of impending danger; to be anxious; to reverence. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  13. A variant of Fere, a mate, a companion. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. A painful emotion or passion excited by the expectation of evil, or the apprehension of impending danger; apprehension; anxiety; solicitude; alarm; dread. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. Apprehension of incurring, or solicitude to avoid, God's wrath; the trembling and awful reverence felt toward the Supreme Belng. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. Respectful reverence for men of authority or worth. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. That which causes, or which is the object of, apprehension or alarm; source or occasion of terror; danger; dreadfulness. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To feel a painful apprehension of; to be afraid of; to consider or expect with emotion of alarm or solicitude. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To have a reverential awe of; to solicitous to avoid the displeasure of. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To be anxious or solicitous for. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To suspect; to doubt. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To affright; to terrify; to drive away or prevent approach of by fear. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Expectation of evil or danger; dread; anxiety; solicitude; reverence. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  24. A painful emotion, excited by danger; apprehension of danger or pain; alarm; the object of fear; (B.) deep reverence; piety towards God. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  25. Alarm; apprehension of evil; reverential awe. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  26. To regard or expect with fear; dread; be afraid. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  27. An emotion excited by threatening or apprehended evil; alarm; dread; terror. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  28. A cause of fear. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. Reverence; awe. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. A painful emotion excited by the apprehension of evil or impending danger; anxiety; the cause or object of fear; dread; awe; reverence; respect. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  31. Apprehension or slight dread of evil; an uneasy or painful emotion excited by impending danger; reverence; due regard. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.

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Usage examples for fear

  1. I fear that many would be very far from glad if they thought it would come to- morrow. – Rome, Turkey and Jerusalem by Edward Hoare
  2. So he will care for the child, never fear – A Little Girl in Old Philadelphia by Amanda Minnie Douglas
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