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Definitions of fell

  1. To sew or hem; - said of seams. Webster Dictionary DB
  2. To hew, cut, or knock, down; as, to fell a tree; turn down (a seam) in a certain way and sew. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  3. To cause to fall; to bring to the ground; to cut down. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  4. To cut down; cause to fall; sew with over-stitches. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  5. To cause to fall; to prostrate; to bring down or to the ground; to cut down. Webster Dictionary DB
  6. To cause to fall; cut down. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  7. To finish with a fell (compare FELL, n.); said of seams. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  8. cause to fall by or as if by delivering a blow; "strike down a tree"; "Lightning struck down the hikers" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. pass away rapidly; "Time flies like an arrow"; "Time fleeing beneath him" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. sew a seam by folding the edges Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. To hem so. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  12. To cause to fall; to bring to the ground by cutting or striking. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  13. Pt. of fall, which see. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  14. To bring to the ground; to knock down; to hew or cut down. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  15. To turn down, as a seam. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  16. seam made by turning under or folding together and stitching the seamed materials to avoid rough edges Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. A barren or rocky hill. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A wild field; a moor. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. The finer portions of ore which go through the meshes, when the ore is sorted by sifting. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. A form of seam joining two pieces of cloth, the edges being folded together and the stitches taken through both thicknesses. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. The end of a web, formed by the last thread of the weft. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. Hair. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  23. A skin or hide of a beast with the wool or hair on; a pelt; - used chiefly in composition, as woolfell. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. The skin of an animal; a hem laid level with the material. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  25. A barren or stony hill. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  26. A skin. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  27. FELLNESS. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  28. Hide of a beast; skin. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  29. Feller. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. A seam finished with a flat, smooth strip. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. A hide or pelt. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  32. The hide or skin of an animal; a hem laid level with the cloth. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  33. A skin or hide. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  34. A low-browed hill; a mountain; a mountain-side. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  35. FELLY. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  36. (of persons or their actions) able or disposed to inflict pain or suffering; "a barbarous crime"; "brutal beatings"; "cruel tortures"; "Stalin's roughshod treatment of the kulaks"; "a savage slap"; "vicious kicks" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  37. imp. of Fall. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. Cruel; barbarous; inhuman; fierce; savage; ravenous. Webster Dictionary DB
  39. Eager; earnest; intent. Webster Dictionary DB
  40. Gall; anger; melancholy. Webster Dictionary DB
  41. Cruel; savage. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  42. Pa.t. of FALL. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  43. Cruel; fierce; bloody. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  44. Fierce; cruel; terrible. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  45. Imp. of FALL, v. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  46. Fierce; cruel; inhuman; hideous. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  47. Cruel; fierce; savage; bloody. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  48. of Fall The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.

What are the misspellings for fell?

Usage examples for fell

  1. Right in front of our eyes our captain- Captain Straight- fell – Private Peat by Harold R. Peat
  2. His head fell again to his hands. – A Fool There Was by Porter Emerson Browne
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