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Definitions of fence

  1. have an argument about something Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. receive stolen goods Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a barrier that serves to enclose an area Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. (informal) a dealer in stolen property Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. fight with fencing swords Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. surround with a wall in order to fortify Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. enclose with a fence; "we fenced in our yard" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. a dealer in stolen property Wordnet Dictionary DB
  9. That which fends off attack or danger; a defense; a protection; a cover; security; shield. Webster Dictionary DB
  10. An inclosure about a field or other space, or about any object; especially, an inclosing structure of wood, iron, or other material, intended to prevent intrusion from without or straying from within. Webster Dictionary DB
  11. A projection on the bolt, which passes through the tumbler gates in locking and unlocking. Webster Dictionary DB
  12. Self-defense by the use of the sword; the art and practice of fencing and sword play; hence, skill in debate and repartee. See Fencing. Webster Dictionary DB
  13. A receiver of stolen goods, or a place where they are received. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To fend off danger from; to give security to; to protect; to guard. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To inclose with a fence or other protection; to secure by an inclosure. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To make a defense; to guard one's self of anything, as against an attack; to give protection or security, as by a fence. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To practice the art of attack and defense with the sword or with the foil, esp. with the smallsword, using the point only. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. Hence, to fight or dispute in the manner of fencers, that is, by thrusting, guarding, parrying, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To guard or protect; defend; to inclose or surround with a fence; fortify. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  20. To practice the art of fencing. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  21. The art of fencing; defense; guard; a boundary consisting of posts, wire, etc.; inclosure; skill in debate. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  22. A wall or hedge for inclosing animals or for protecting land; the art of fencing; defence. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  23. To inclose with a fence; to fortify. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  24. To practice fencing. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  25. A structure for inclosing land. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  26. To inclose with a fence. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  27. To practise fencing. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  28. To enclose with a fence; secure; protect. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  29. To practise with a foil or sword; strive skilfully, as in debate. To provide a fence or defense. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  30. Fencer. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  31. A structure, as of rails, for enclosing land; a defense; shield; bul-wark. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  32. The use of weapons, as in fencing; repartee. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  33. A wall, hedge, or line of posts and rails, to confine animals or protect land; defence; guard; fencing; skill in word-fence; guard of a carpenter's plane; a receiver of stolen goods. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  34. To enclose with a fence; to guard; to fortify. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  35. To practise fencing; to raise a fence; to guard. Ring fence, a fence which encircles a whole estate. See Defence. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  36. A boundary composed of a hedge, or line of posts or stakes driven into the ground; guard; security. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  37. To enclose with a hedge or wall of posts; to protect or guard; to defend by giving and avoiding blows, as with a foil or sword. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  38. v. In old Scotch law. To defend or protect by formalities. To "fence a court"was to open it in due form, and interdict all manner of persons from disturbing theirproceedings. This was called "fencing," q. d., defending or protecting the court thelawdictionary.org
  39. (Heb. gader), Numbers 22:24 (RSV). Fences were constructions of unmortared stones, to protect gardens, vineyards, sheepfolds, etc. From various causes they were apt to bulge out and fall ( Psalms 62:3 ). In Psalms 80:12 , RSV (see Isaiah 5:5 ), the psalmist says, "Why hast thou broken down her fences?" Serpents delight to lurk in the crevices of such fences (Eccl 10:8 ; Compare Amos 5:19 ). biblestudytools.com
  40. A building or erection between two contiguous estates, so as to divide them; or on the same estate, so as to divide one part from another. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  41. Fences are regulated by the local laws. In general, fences on boundaries are to be built on the line, and the expense, when made no more expensively than is required by the law, is borne equally between the parties. See the following cases on the subject. 2 Miles, 337, 395; 2 Greenl. 72; 11 Mass. 294; 3 Wend. 142; 2 Metc. 180; 15 Conn. 526 2 Miles, 447; Bouv. Inst. Index, h. t. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  42. A partition fence is presumed to be the common property of both owners of the land. 8 B. & C. 257, 259, note a. When built upon the land of one of them, it is his; but if it were built equally upon the land of both, at their joint expense, each would be the owner in severalty of the part standing on his own land. 5 Taunt. 20; 2 Greenl. Ev. 617. 1215.org/lawnotes/bouvier/bouvier.htm
  43. 1. A sequence of one or more distinguished (out-of-band)characters (or other data items), used to delimit a piece ofdata intended to be treated as a unit (the computer-scienceliterature calls this a "sentinel"). The NUL (ASCII 0000000)character that terminates strings in C is a fence. Hex FFis also (though slightly less frequently) used this way. Seezigamorph.2. An extra data value inserted in an array or other datastructure in order to allow some normal test on the array'scontents also to function as a termination test. For example,a highly optimised routine for finding a value in an arraymight artificially place a copy of the value to be searchedfor after the last slot of the array, thus allowing the mainsearch loop to search for the value without having to check ateach pass whether the end of the array had been reached.3. [among users of optimising compilers] Any technique,usually exploiting knowledge about the compiler, that blockscertain optimisations. Used when explicit mechanisms are notavailable or are overkill. Typically a hack: "I call a dummyprocedure there to force a flush of the optimiser'sregister-colouring info" can be expressed by the shorter"That's a fence procedure". foldoc_fs
  44. fens, n. a wall or hedge for enclosing animals or for protecting land: the art of fencing: defence: a receiver of stolen goods, also a receiving-house.--v.t. to enclose with a fence: to fortify.--v.i. to practise fencing: to conceal the truth by equivocal answers.--adjs. FENCED, enclosed with a fence; FENCE'LESS, without fence or enclosure, open.--n. FENC'ER, one who practises fencing with a sword.--adj. FENC'IBLE, capable of being fenced or defended.--n.pl. FENC'IBLES, volunteer regiments raised for local defence during a special crisis: militia enlisted for home service.--p.adj. FENC'ING, defending or guarding.--n. the act of erecting a fence: the art of attack and defence with a sword or other weapon.--n. FENC'ING-MAS'TER, one who teaches fencing.--FENCE THE TABLES, in the ancient usage of Scotland, to debar from partaking in communion those guilty of any known sin.--SIT ON THE FENCE, to be still hesitating as between two opinions; SUNK FENCE, a ditch or water-course. [Abbrev. of defence.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  45. Art of fencing, use of the sword, (master of f., skilled swordsman, often fig. =good debater); (archaic) bulwark; hedge, wall, railing, &c., keeping out intruders from field &c. (sunk f., placed along bottom of ditch; sit on the f., remain neutral in contest, not take sides; come &c. down on right side of f., join winner; PUT horse at f.); guard, guide, gauge, in various machines; receiver, receiving-house, of stolen goods; f. -month, -season, -time, close time for game or fish. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  46. Practise sword-play, use the sword scientifically, (f. with question or questioner, parry, evade answering); screen, shield, protect, (from, against); repel, keep off or out; surround (as) with f., enclose, fortify, (fenced cities in O.T.; often about, in, round, up); (of horse) leap ff.; deal in stolen goods. Hence fencer n. Concise Oxford Dictionary
  47. n. That which fends off attack or danger; a defence;—a wall, hedge, or other inclosing structure about a field, garden, or the like;—self-defence by the use of the sword; fencing;—a guard for a carpenter’s plane;—a receiver of stolen goods. Cabinet Dictionary
  48. Guard, security, outwork, defence; inclosure, mound, hedge; the art of fencing, defence; skill in defence. Complete Dictionary
  49. To inclose, to secure by an inclosure or hedge; to guard. Complete Dictionary
  50. To practise the arts of manual defence; to guard against, to act on the defensive; to fight according to art. Complete Dictionary

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