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Definitions of file

  1. a set of related records (either written or electronic) kept together Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. proceed in file Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a steel hand tool with small sharp teeth on some or all of its surfaces; used for smoothing wood or metal Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. office furniture consisting of a container for keeping papers in order Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. a line of persons or things ranged one behind the other Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. place in a file Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. register in a public office or in a court of law; "file for divorce"; "file a complaint" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. file a formal charge against; "The suspect was charged with murdering his wife" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. smooth with a file; "file one's fingernails" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. place in a container for keeping records; "File these bills, please" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  11. record in a public office or in a court of law; "file for divorce"; "file a complaint" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  12. proceed in line; "The students filed into the classroom" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. To make foul; to defile. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. An orderly succession; a line; a row Webster Dictionary DB
  15. A row of soldiers ranged one behind another; -- in contradistinction to rank, which designates a row of soldiers standing abreast; a number consisting the depth of a body of troops, which, in the ordinary modern formation, consists of two men, the battalion standing two deep, or in two ranks. Newage Dictionary DB
  16. An orderly collection of papers, arranged in sequence or classified for preservation and reference; as, files of letters or of newspapers; this mail brings English files to the 15th instant. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. The line, wire, or other contrivance, by which papers are put and kept in order. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. A roll or list. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. Course of thought; thread of narration. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To set in order; to arrange, or lay away, esp. as papers in a methodical manner for preservation and reverence; to place on file; to insert in its proper place in an arranged body of papers. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To bring before a court or legislative body by presenting proper papers in a regular way; as, to file a petition or bill. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To put upon the files or among the records of a court; to note on (a paper) the fact date of its reception in court. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. A steel instrument, having cutting ridges or teeth, made by indentation with a chisel, used for abrading or smoothing other substances, as metals, wood, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. Anything employed to smooth, polish, or rasp, literally or figuratively. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. A shrewd or artful person. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To rub, smooth, or cut away, with a file; to sharpen with a file; as, to file a saw or a tooth. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. To smooth or polish as with a file. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. A term commonly used to describe both the process of submitting a document to a court--for example, "I filed my small claims case today"--and to describe the physical location where these papers are kept. Traditionally, a court's case files were kept indefinitely in one or more cardboard folders. Today many files--especially those for inactive cases--are stored by computer.
  29. A row of soldiers ranged one behind another; - in contradistinction to rank, which designates a row of soldiers standing abreast. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. To march in a file or line, as soldiers, not abreast, but one after another; - generally with off. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. A wire, etc., on which papers are strung for safe-keeping or reference; a bundle of papers fastened together and endorsed with the date, contents, etc., of each; a case or cabinet in which papers may be arranged in an orderly way; a line of soldiers ranged one behind the other; a tool of hard steel with small grooves on the surface, used for cutting and smoothing. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  32. To cut or smooth with such a tool; to arrange and put away (papers, etc.) in orderly fashion, for reference; place among the records of a court or house of legislature. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  33. To march in a line. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  34. A line or wire on which papers are placed in order; the papers so placed; a roll or list; a line of soldiers ranged behind one another. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  35. To put upon a file; to arrange in an orderly manner; to put among the records of a court; to bring before a court. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  36. To march in a file. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  37. A steel instrument with sharpedged furrows for smoothing or rasping metals, etc. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  38. To cut or smooth with, or as with a file. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  39. Steel instrument for smoothing metals, &c. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  40. To cut or smooth with a file. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  41. To march in file. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  42. To put upon a file. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  43. Wire on which papers are stuck; bundle of arranged papers; list; line of soldiers behind one another. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  44. To cut or sharpen with a file. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  45. A hard steel abrading instrument. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  46. To put on file, as papers. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  47. To march in file, as soldiers. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  48. Any device to keep papers in order for reference. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  49. A collection of papers arranged for reference. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  50. A row of men standing or marching one behind another. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  51. A roll; list. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  52. A line or wire on which papers are strung; the papers so strung or otherwise arranged in order; a bundle of papers tied together, with the title of each indorsed; a list or catalogue; a row of soldiers ranged one behind another, from front to rear. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  53. A well-known steel instrument with little furrows on the surface, used in cutting or smoothing metals, ivory, or wood; a polishing apparatus. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  54. To string or to fasten as papers, on a line or wire for preservation; to arrange papers in a bundle and in order; to present or exhibit officially or for trial. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  55. To smooth or cut, as with a file; to correct. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  56. To march in a file or line, as soldiers. To file off, to wheel off by files and march in length. Rank and file, the common soldiers; a body of men under leaders. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  57. A line or wire on which papers are strung for preservation and reference; the number of papers so strung; a bundle of papers tied and titled; a row of soldiers ranged one behind the other, but, generally speaking, two soldiers, the front and rear-rank men. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  58. To fasten together, as paper on a wire for preservation; to place officially among the records of a court. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  59. A well-known steel tool with a toothed or ridged surface for reducing, smoothing, or cutting any article made of a metal. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  60. To rub or smooth with a file; to wear off by friction. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  61. n. A thread, string, or wire upon which writs and other exhibits in courts andoffices are fastened or filed for the more safe-keeping and ready turning to the same.Spelman ; Cowell; Tomlins. Papers put together and tied in bundles. A paper is said alsoto be filed when it is delivered to the proper officer, and by him received to be kept onfile. 13 Vin. Abr. 211; 1 Litt. 113; 1 Hawk. P. C. 7, 207; Phillips v. Beene. 38 Ala. 251;Holman v. Chevaillier. 14 Tex. 338; Beebe v. Morrell, 70 Mich. 114, 42 X. W. 1119, 15Am. St. Rep. 2SS. But. in general, "file," or "the files." is used loosely to denote theofficial custody of the court or the place in the offices of a court where the records andpapers are kept. thelawdictionary.org
  62. To march in a file or line, as soldiers, not abreast, but one after another; -- generally with off. mso.anu.edu.au
  63. An element of data storage in a file system.The history of computing is rich in varied kinds of files andfile systems, whether ornate like the Macintosh filesystem or deficient like many simple pre-1980s file systemsthat didn't have directories. However, a typical file hasthese characteristics:* It is a single sequence of bytes (but consider Macintoshresource forks).* It has a finite length, unlike, e.g., a Unix device.* It is stored in a non-volatile storage medium (but seeramdrive).* It exists (nominally) in a directory.* It has a name that it can be referred to by in fileoperations, possibly in combination with its path.Additionally, a file system may support other fileattributes, such as permissions; timestamps for creation,last modification, and last access and revision numbers (a` laVMS).Compare: document. foldoc_fs
  64. f[=i]l, n. a line or wire on which papers are placed in order: the papers so placed: a roll or list: a line of soldiers ranged behind one another: the number of men forming the depth of a battalion.--v.t. to put upon a file: to arrange in an orderly manner: to put among the records of a court: to bring before a court.--v.i. to march in a file.--n. FILE'-LEAD'ER.--FILE OFF, to wheel off at right angles to the first direction; FILE WITH, to rank with, to be equal to.--SINGLE FILE, INDIAN FILE, of men marching one behind another. [Fr. file--L. filum, a thread.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  65. f[=i]l, n. a steel instrument with sharp-edged furrows for smoothing or rasping metals, &c.: any means adopted to polish a thing, as a literary style: a shrewd, cunning person, a deep fellow: a pickpocket.--v.t. to cut or smooth with, or as with, a file: to polish, improve.--n. FILE'-CUT'TER, a maker of files.--adj. FILED, polished, smooth.--ns. FILE'-FISH, a fish of genus Balistes, the skin granulated like a file; FIL'ER, one who files; FIL'ING, a particle rubbed off with a file. [A.S. feól; Ger. feile; Dut. vijl.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  66. f[=i]l, v.t. (Shak.) to defile, pollute. gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  67. Instrument usu. of steel with roughened surface (s) for reducing or smoothing objects (bite, gnaw, f., attempt vain task) (slang) artful person, dodger, (usu. old, deep, &c., f.), person. (Vb) smooth, reduce surface of, with f.; elaborate to perfection (esp. literary work); f. away (roughnesses &c.), remove with f. [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  68. Stiff pointed wire on which documents &c. are run for keeping; kinds of appliance for holding papers arranged for reference; set of papers so kept, esp. in court of law referring to a cause; series of issues of a newspaper in order; (vb) place (papers) on f. or among public records. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  69. (Mil.) a front-rank man& the man or men straight behind him (inf., marching with the men of a double line faced towards one of its ends; single, Indian, f., similar formation of single line; RANK& f.; a f. of men, two told off for some purpose); row of persons or things one behind another; (Chess) line of squares from player to player (cf. RANK). (Vb) march in f.; f. off, away, go off by ff.; (trans.) order (soldiers) to move off by ff. [French] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  70. [Fr.] (Mil.) The front and corresponding rear rank man of any double rank of soldiers drawn up in line. Glossary of terms and phrases - Percy
  71. n. [Latin] An orderly succession; a line; a row of soldiers ranged behind one another;—an orderly collection of papers arranged for preservation and ready reference; also, the line, wire, or other contrivance by which papers are put and kept in order. Cabinet Dictionary
  72. n. [Anglo-Saxon, German] A steel instrument having the surface covered with sharp-edged furrows, used for abrading or smoothing other substances. Cabinet Dictionary
  73. A thread; a line on which papers are strung; a catalogue, roll; a line of soldiers ranged one behind another; an instrument to smooth metals. Complete Dictionary

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