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Definitions of fill

  1. eat until one is sated; "He filled up on turkey" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. occupy the whole of; "The liquid fills the container" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. a quantity sufficient to satisfy; "he ate his fill of potatoes"; "she had heard her fill of gossip" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. any material that fills a space or container; "there was not enough fill for the trench" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. plug with a substance; "fill a cavity" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. become full; "The pool slowly filled with water"; "The theater filled up slowly" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. make full, also in a metaphorical sense; "fill a container"; "fill the child with pride" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. fill or meet a want or need Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. fill to satisfaction; "I am sated" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. fill or stop up; "Can you close the cracks with caulking?" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. assume, as of positions or roles; "She took the job as director of development" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. appoint someone to (a position or a job) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  13. One of the thills or shafts of a carriage. Webster Dictionary DB
  14. To make full; to supply with as much as can be held or contained; to put or pour into, till no more can be received; to occupy the whole capacity of. Webster Dictionary DB
  15. To furnish an abudant supply to; to furnish with as mush as is desired or desirable; to occupy the whole of; to swarm in or overrun. Webster Dictionary DB
  16. To fill or supply fully with food; to feed; to satisfy. Webster Dictionary DB
  17. To possess and perform the duties of; to officiate in, as an incumbent; to occupy; to hold; as, a king fills a throne; the president fills the office of chief magistrate; the speaker of the House fills the chair. Webster Dictionary DB
  18. To supply with an incumbent; as, to fill an office or a vacancy. Webster Dictionary DB
  19. To press and dilate, as a sail; as, the wind filled the sails. Webster Dictionary DB
  20. To trim (a yard) so that the wind shall blow on the after side of the sails. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. To make an embankment in, or raise the level of (a low place), with earth or gravel. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. To become full; to have the whole capacity occupied; to have an abundant supply; to be satiated; as, corn fills well in a warm season; the sail fills with the wind. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. To fill a cup or glass for drinking. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. A full supply, as much as supplies want; as much as gives complete satisfaction. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. That which fills; filling; specif., an embankment, as in railroad construction, to fill a hollow or ravine; also, the place which is to be filled. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. To make full; satisfy; crowd; occupy; to perform, as duties, in the place of someone. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  27. To become full; pour a glass or vessel full. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  28. As much as produces complete satisfaction; a full supply. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  29. To make full; to put into until all the space is occupied; to supply abundantly; to satisfy; to glut; to perform the duties of; to supply a vacant office. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  30. To become full; to become satiated. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  31. As much as fills or satisfies; a full supply. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  32. A full supply. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  33. To become full. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  34. To make full; supply; occupy. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  35. To make or become full. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  36. To occupy; pervade. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  37. To satisfy; glut. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  38. That which fills; a supply. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  39. Filler. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  40. As much as supplies want or satisfies. To fill out, to extend or enlarge to the desired limit. To fill up, to make full; to fill; to engage or employ; to complete; to become full. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  41. To make full; to put or pour in till the space is full; to supply with abundance; to cause to abound; to satisfy; to glut; to supply with an incumbent; to possess and perform the duties of; to brace the yards so that the wind will act upon and dilate the sails. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  42. To fill a cup or glass for drinking; to become full. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  43. To put or pour in all that can be held; to crowd; to stuff; to content or satisfy; to hold or occupy, as any post or office; to become full. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  44. As much as satisfies fully. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  45. To make full; to complete; to satisfy or fulfill; to possess and perform theduties of.The election of a person to an office constitutes the essence of his appointment; butthe office cannot be considered as actually filled until his acceptance, either express orimplied. Johnston v. Wilson, 2 N. II. 202, 9 Am. Dec. 50.Where one subscribes for shares in a corporation, agreeing to "take and fill" acertain number of shares, assumpsit will lie against him to recover an assessment onhis shares; the word "fill," in this connection, amounting to a promise to payassessments. Bangor Bridge Co. v. McMahon, 10 Me. 478.To fill a prescription is to furnish, prepare, and combine the requisite materials indue proportion as prescribed. Ray v. Burbank, 61 Ga. 505, 34 Am. Rep. 103. thelawdictionary.org
  46. fil, v.t. to make full: to put into until all the space is occupied: to supply abundantly: to satisfy: to glut: to perform the duties of: to supply a vacant office.--v.i. to become full: to become satiated.--n. as much as fills or satisfies: a full supply: a single charge of anything.--ns. FILL'ER, he who, or that which, fills: a vessel for conveying a liquid into a bottle; FILL'ING, anything used to fill up, stop a hole, to complete, &c., as the woof, in weaving: supply. [A.S. fyllan, fullian--ful, full.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  47. fil, n. (Shak.) the thill or shaft of a cart or carriage. [See THILL.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  48. Make or become full (with; sails f., are distended with wind); stock abundantly; occupy whole capacity or extent of, spread over, pervade, (f. the bill, be the only conspicuous item, also in United States, do all that is required, suffice); (of dentist) block up (hollow tooth, cavity) with gold &c., whence filling n.; satisfy, satiate, (esp. in part., of kinds of food); hold (position), discharge duties of (office); occupy (vacant time); appoint holder of (vacant post); adulterate (esp. cotton fabrics; usu. in p.p.); f. in, complete (outline), add what is wanted to complete (unfinished document, blank cheque, &c.); f. out, enlarge, become enlarged, to the proper limit; f. up, f. completely, supply vacant parts or places or deficiencies in, do away with (pond &c.) by filling, grow full; FEBRUARY f.-dike; hence filler (1, 2) n. (N.) full supply of drink or food (drink, have, &c., one\'s f.; also with intr. vbs as fret her f.); enough to f. something (a f. of tobacco). [old English] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  49. n. A full supply; as much as gives complete satisfaction;—a thill or shaft of a carriage. Cabinet Dictionary
  50. As much as may produce complete satisfaction; the place between the shafts of a carriage. Complete Dictionary

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