Spellcheck.net

Definitions of fire

  1. (archaic) once thought to be one of four elements composing the universe (Empedocles) Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  2. feelings of great warmth and intensity; "he spoke with great ardor" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  3. call forth; of emotions, feelings, and responses; "arouse pity"; "raise a smile"; "evoke sympathy" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  4. intense adverse criticism; "Clinton directed his fire at the Republican Party"; "the government has come under attack"; "don't give me any flak" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  5. destroy by fire; "They burned the house and his diaries" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  6. terminate the employment of; "The boss fired his secretary today"; "The company terminated 25% of its workers" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  7. provide with fuel; "Oil fires the furnace" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  8. the act of firing weapons or artillery at an enemy; "hold your fire until you can see the whites of their eyes"; "they retreated in the face of withering enemy fire" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  9. a fireplace in which a fire is burning; "they sat by the fire and talked" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  10. the event of something burning (often destructive); "they lost everything in the fire" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  11. a severe trial; "he went through fire and damnation" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  12. the process of combustion of inflammable materials producing heat and light and (often) smoke; "fire was one of our ancestors' first discoveries" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  13. Bake in a kiln; "fire pottery" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  14. cause to go off; "fire a gun"; "fire a bullet" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  15. start firing a weapon Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  16. go off or discharge; "The gun fired" Scrapingweb Dictionary DB
  17. once thought to be one of four elements composing the universe (Empedocles) Wordnet Dictionary DB
  18. bake in a kiln so as to harden; "fire pottery" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  19. drive out or away by or as if by fire; "The soldiers were fired"; "Surrender fires the cold skepticism" Wordnet Dictionary DB
  20. The evolution of light and heat in the combustion of bodies; combustion; state of ignition. Webster Dictionary DB
  21. Fuel in a state of combustion, as on a hearth, or in a stove or a furnace. Webster Dictionary DB
  22. The burning of a house or town; a conflagration. Webster Dictionary DB
  23. Anything which destroys or affects like fire. Webster Dictionary DB
  24. Ardor of passion, whether love or hate; excessive warmth; consuming violence of temper. Webster Dictionary DB
  25. Liveliness of imagination or fancy; intellectual and moral enthusiasm; capacity for ardor and zeal. Webster Dictionary DB
  26. Splendor; brilliancy; luster; hence, a star. Webster Dictionary DB
  27. Torture by burning; severe trial or affliction. Webster Dictionary DB
  28. The discharge of firearms; firing; as, the troops were exposed to a heavy fire. Webster Dictionary DB
  29. To set on fire; to kindle; as, to fire a house or chimney; to fire a pile. Webster Dictionary DB
  30. To subject to intense heat; to bake; to burn in a kiln; as, to fire pottery. Webster Dictionary DB
  31. To inflame; to irritate, as the passions; as, to fire the soul with anger, pride, or revenge. Webster Dictionary DB
  32. To animate; to give life or spirit to; as, to fire the genius of a young man. Webster Dictionary DB
  33. To feed or serve the fire of; as, to fire a boiler. Webster Dictionary DB
  34. To light up as if by fire; to illuminate. Webster Dictionary DB
  35. To cause to explode; as, to fire a torpedo; to disharge; as, to fire a musket or cannon; to fire cannon balls, rockets, etc. Webster Dictionary DB
  36. To drive by fire. Webster Dictionary DB
  37. To cauterize. Webster Dictionary DB
  38. To take fire; to be kindled; to kindle. Webster Dictionary DB
  39. To be irritated or inflamed with passion. Webster Dictionary DB
  40. To discharge artillery or firearms; as, they fired on the town. Webster Dictionary DB
  41. Heat and light developed by combustion or burning; a burning; conflagration; flame; discharge of firearms; light; intensity of feeling; ardor. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  42. To set on fire; inflame; kindle; bake, as porcelain; to cause to explode; to discharge, as a gun; excite violently; irritate. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  43. To become ignited; be inflamed; discharge firearms. The Winston Simplified Dictionary. By William Dodge Lewis, Edgar Arthur Singer. Published 1919.
  44. The heat and light caused by burning; flame; anything burning, as fuel in a grate, etc.; a confiagration; torture by burning; severe trial; anything inflaming or provoking; ardor of passion; vigor; brightness of fancy; enthusiasm; sexual love. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  45. To set on fire: to inflame: to irritate: to animate; to cause the explosion of; to discharge. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  46. To take fire; to be or become irritated or inflamed; to discharge firearms. The american dictionary of the english language. By Daniel Lyons. Published 1899.
  47. Heat and light caused by burning; flame; anything burning; ardent passion; enthusiasm. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  48. To set on fire; discharge; animate. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  49. To take fire; discharge fire-arms. The Clarendon dictionary. By William Hand Browne, Samuel Stehman Haldeman. Published 1894.
  50. To set on fire; kindle; bake, as pottery; discharge, as a firearm; impel, as from a gun; hurl. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  51. To inflame; excite. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  52. To take fire; be kindled, inflamed, or excited. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  53. To discharge firearms. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  54. The evolution of heat and light by burning; flame; flash; fuel as burning. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  55. The discharge of firearms. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  56. Intensity; ardor; passion; vivacity. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  57. Affliction; trial. The Concise Standard Dictionary of the English Language. By James Champlin Fernald. Published 1919.
  58. Heat and light emanating from a body burning; fuel burning on a hearth, &c.; the burning of a house or town; a conflagration; the discharge of fire-arms; light; lustre; that which inflames or irritates the passions; ardour or violence of passion; glow of imagination; severe trial; trouble; affliction. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  59. To set on fire; to inflame; to irritate; to animate; to cause to explode; to discharge; to cauterize. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  60. To take fire; to become irritated or inflamed; to discharge artillery or fire-arms. "Fire" a word of command for soldiers to discharge their fire-arms. To set on fire, to kindle; to excite violent action. To be on fire, to be in a state of ignition; to be highly excited. To be under fire, to be exposed to the attack of an enemy by cannonade or fusillade. Anthony's fire. See Anthony's Fire. Greek fire, an artificial combustible of a highly inflammable quality, used by the Greeks of the Byzantine empire against the Saracens, and which seems to have bad the power of burning even under water. Nuttall's Standard dictionary of the English language. By Nuttall, P.Austin. Published 1914.
  61. The result of the combustion or burning of bodies, as coal, wood, &c.; a conflagration; severe trial or affliction; flame; lustre; the burning fuel in a grate; anything which inflames the passions; ardour; rage; animation. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  62. To kindle; to set on fire; to take fire; to become irritated; to discharge firearms. Etymological and pronouncing dictionary of the English language. By Stormonth, James, Phelp, P. H. Published 1874.
  63. is represented as the symbol of Jehovahs presence and the instrument of his power, in the way either of approval or of destruction. ( Exodus 3:2 ; 14:19 ) etc. There could not be a better symbol for Jehovah than this of fire, it being immaterial, mysterious, but visible, warming, cheering, comforting, but also terrible and consuming. Parallel with this application of fire and with its symbolical meaning are to be noted the similar use for sacrificial purposes and the respect paid to it, or to the heavenly bodies as symbols of deity, which prevailed among so many nations of antiquity, and of which the traces are not even now extinct; e.g. the Sabean and Magian systems of worship. ( Isaiah 27:9 ) Fire for sacred purposes obtained elsewhere than from the altar was called "strange fire," and for the use of such Nadab and Abihu were punished with death by fire from God. ( Leviticus 10:1 Leviticus 10:2 ; Numbers 3:4 ; 26:61 ) biblestudytools.com
  64. The effect of combustion. The Juridical meaning of the word does not differfrom the vernacular. 1 Pars. Mar. Law, 231, et seq. thelawdictionary.org
  65. For sacred purposes. The sacrifices were consumed by fire ( Genesis 8:20 ). The ever-burning fire on the altar was first kindled from heaven ( Leviticus 6:9 Leviticus 6:13 ; 9:24 ), and afterwards rekindled at the dedication of Solomon's temple ( 2 Chronicles 7:1 2 Chronicles 7:3 ). The expressions "fire from heaven" and "fire of the Lord" generally denote lightning, but sometimes also the fire of the altar was so called ( Exodus 29:18 ; Leviticus 1:9 ; 2:3 ; Leviticus 3:5 Leviticus 3:9 ). Fire for a sacred purpose obtained otherwise than from the altar was called "strange fire" ( Leviticus 10:1 Leviticus 10:2 ; Numbers 3:4 ). The victims slain for sin offerings were afterwards consumed by fire outside the camp ( Leviticus 4:12 Leviticus 4:21 ; 6:30 ; 16:27 ; Hebrews 13:11 ). biblestudytools.com
  66. For domestic purposes, such as baking, cooking, warmth, etc. ( Jeremiah 36:22 ; Mark 14:54 ; John 18:18 ). But on Sabbath no fire for any domestic purpose was to be kindled ( Exodus 35:3 ; Numbers 15:32-36 ). biblestudytools.com
  67. Punishment of death by fire was inflicted on such as were guilty of certain forms of unchastity and incest ( Leviticus 20:14 ; 21:9 ). The burning of captives in war was not unknown among the Jews ( 2 Samuel 12:31 ; Jeremiah 29:22 ). The bodies of infamous persons who were executed were also sometimes burned ( Joshua 7:25 ; 2 Kings 23:16 ). biblestudytools.com
  68. In war, fire was used in the destruction of cities, as Jericho ( Joshua 6:24 ), Ai ( 8:19 ), Hazor ( 11:11 ), Laish (Judg. 18:27 ), etc. The war-chariots of the Canaanites were burnt ( Joshua 11:6 Joshua 11:9 Joshua 11:13 ). The Israelites burned the images ( 2 Kings 10:26 ; RSV, "pillars") of the house of Baal. These objects of worship seem to have been of the nature of obelisks, and were sometimes evidently made of wood. Torches were sometimes carried by the soldiers in battle ( Judges 7:16 ). biblestudytools.com
  69. Figuratively, fire is a symbol of Jehovah's presence and the instrument of his power ( Exodus 14:19 ; Numbers 11:1 Numbers 11:3 ; Judg. 13:20 ; 1 Kings 18:38 ; 2 Kings 1 Kings 1:10 1 Kings 1:12 ; 2:11 ; Isaiah 6:4 ; Ezek. 1:4 ; Revelation 1:14 , etc.). God's word is also likened unto fire ( Jeremiah 23:29 ). It is referred to as an emblem of severe trials or misfortunes ( Zechariah 12:6 ; Luke 12:49 ; 1 Corinthians 3:13 1 Corinthians 3:15 ; 1 Peter 1:7 ), and of eternal punishment ( Matthew 5:22 ; Mark 9:44 ; Revelation 14:10 ; 21:8 ). The influence of the Holy Ghost is likened unto fire ( Matthew 3:11 ). His descent was denoted by the appearance of tongues as of fire ( Acts 2:3 ). These dictionary topics are fromM.G. Easton M.A., D.D., Illustrated Bible Dictionary, Third Edition,published by Thomas Nelson, 1897. Public Domain, copy freely.[N] indicates this entry was also found in Nave's Topical Bible[T] indicates this entry was also found in Torrey's Topical Textbook[B] indicates this entry was also found in Baker's Evangelical Dictionary[J] indicates this entry was also found in Jack Van Impe's Prophecy Dictionary[S] indicates this entry was also found in Smith's Bible DictionaryBibliography InformationEaston, Matthew George. "Entry for Fire". "Easton's Bible Dictionary". . biblestudytools.com
  70. f[=i]r, n. the heat and light caused by burning: flame: anything burning, as fuel in a grate, &c.: a conflagration: torture or death by burning: severe trial: anything inflaming or provoking: ardour of passion: vigour: brightness of fancy: enthusiasm: sexual passion.--v.t. to set on fire: to inflame: to irritate: to animate: to cause the explosion of: to discharge.--v.i. to take fire: to be or become irritated or inflamed: to discharge firearms.--n. FIRE'-ALARM', an alarm of fire, an apparatus for giving such.--n.pl. FIRE'ARMS, arms or weapons which are discharged by fire exploding gunpowder.--ns. FIRE'-AR'ROW, a small iron dart or arrow furnished with a combustible for setting fire to ships; FIRE'BALL, a ball filled with combustibles to be thrown among enemies: a meteor; FIRE'-BALLOON', a balloon carrying a fire placed in the lower part for rarefying the air to make itself buoyant: a balloon sent up arranged to ignite at a certain height; FIRE'-BAS'KET, a portable grate for a bedroom; FIRE'-BLAST, a blast or blight affecting plants, in which they appear as if scorched by the sun; FIRE'-BOAT, a steamboat fitted up to extinguish fires in docks; FIRE'BOX, the box or chamber (usually copper) of a steam-engine, in which the fire is placed; FIRE'BRAND, a brand or piece of wood on fire: one who inflames the passions of others; FIRE'BRICK, a brick so made as to resist the action of fire, used for lining furnaces, &c.; FIRE'-BRIGADE', a brigade or company of men for extinguishing fires or conflagrations; FIRE'-BUCK'ET, a bucket for carrying water to extinguish a fire; FIRE'CLAY, a kind of clay, capable of resisting fire, used in making firebricks; FIRE'COCK, a cock or spout to let out water for extinguishing fires; FIRE'DAMP, a gas, carburetted hydrogen, in coal-mines, apt to take fire and explode when mixed with atmospheric air; FIRE'-DOG (same as ANDIRON); FIRE'-DRAKE, a fiery meteor, a kind of firework; FIRE'-EAT'ER, a juggler who pretends to eat fire: one given to needless quarrelling, a professed duellist; FIRE'-EN'GINE, an engine or forcing-pump used to extinguish fires with water; FIRE'-ESCAPE', a machine used to enable people to escape from fires.--adj. FIRE'-EYED (Shak.), having fiery eyes.--ns. FIRE'-FLAG (Coleridge), FIRE'FLAUGHT (Swinburne), a flash of lightning; FIRE'-FLY, a name applied to many phosphorescent insects, all included with the Coleoptera or beetles, some giving forth a steady light, others flashing light intermittently (glow-worms, &c.); FIRE'-GUARD, a framework of wire placed in front of a fireplace.--n.pl. FIRE'-[=I]'RONS, the irons--poker, tongs, and shovel--used for a fire.--ns. FIRE'LIGHT'ER, a composition of pitch and sawdust, or the like, for kindling fires; FIRE'LOCK, a gun in which the fire is caused by a lock with steel and flint; FIRE'MAN, a man whose business it is to assist in extinguishing fires: a man who tends the fires, as of a steam-engine; FIRE'-MAS'TER, the chief of a fire-brigade.--adj. FIRE'-NEW, new from the fire: brand new: bright.--ns. FIRE'-PAN, a pan or metal vessel for holding fire; FIRE'PLACE, the place in a house appropriated to the fire: a hearth; FIRE'PLUG, a plug placed in a pipe which supplies water in case of fire; FIRE'-POL'ICY, a written instrument of insurance against fire up to a certain amount; FIRE'-POT, an earthen pot filled with combustibles, used in military operations.--adj. FIRE'PROOF, proof against fire.--ns. FIRE'-PROOFING, the act of rendering anything fireproof: the materials used; FIR'ER, an incendiary; FIRE'-RAIS'ING, the crime of arson.--adj. FIRE'-ROBED (Shak.), robed in fire.--ns. FIRE'-SCREEN, a screen for intercepting the heat of the fire; FIRE'-SHIP, a ship filled with combustibles, to set an enemy's vessels on fire; FIRE'SIDE, the side of the fireplace: the hearth: home.--adj. homely, intimate.--ns. FIRE'-STICK, the implement used by many primitive peoples for obtaining fire by friction; FIRE'STONE, a kind of sandstone that bears a high degree of heat; FIRE'-WA'TER, ardent spirits; FIRE'WOOD, wood for burning.--n.pl. FIRE'WORKS, artificial works or preparations of gunpowder, sulphur, &c., to be fired chiefly for display or amusement.--ns. FIRE'-WOR'SHIP, the worship of fire, chiefly by the Parsees in Persia and India; FIRE'-WOR'SHIPPER; FIR'ING, a putting fire to: discharge of guns: firewood: fuel: cauterisation; FIR'ING-PAR'TY, a detachment told off to fire over the grave of one buried with military honours, or to shoot one sentenced to death; FIR'ING-POINT, the temperature at which an inflammable oil will take fire spontaneously.--FIRE OFF, to discharge a shot; FIRE OUT (Shak.), to expel; FIRE UP, to start a fire: to fly into a passion.--SET THE THAMES ON FIRE, to do something striking; TAKE FIRE, to begin to burn: to become aroused about something. [A.S. fýr; Ger. feuer; Gr. pyr.] gutenberg.org/ebooks/37683
  71. Active principle operative in combustion, flame, incandescence, (set f. to, kindle; strike f., elicit sparks by friction or blow; no smoke without f., always some ground for rumour); state of combustion (on f., burning, fig. excited; set on f., ignite, excite; set Thames on f., do something remarkable; catch, take, f., be ignited); burning fuel in grate, furnace, &c. (heap COALS of f.; burnt child dreads the f.; out of FRYING-pan into f.; FAT is in the f.), whence firing (3) n.; conflagration, destructive burning, (fire!, call for aid at a f.; pour oil on f., add to excitement while deprecating it; go through f. & water, face all perils); Greek f., combustible composition for igniting enemy\'s ships &c.; luminosity, glow, (St Elmo\'s f., corposant); burning heat, fever, (St Anthony\'s f., erysipelas); vehement emotion, fervour, spirit, lively imagination, vivacity, poetic inspiration; firing of guns (open, cease, f.; running f., successive shots from line of troops &c., esp. fig. of criticism, objections, &c.; between two ff., shot at from two directions; line of f., path of bullet about to be shot; under f., being shot at; HANG, MISS, f.); f.-alarm, automatic arrangement for giving notice of f.; f.-arm (usu. pl.), rifle, gun, pistol, &c.; fireback, Sumatran pheasant; f.-ball, large meteor, globular lightning, (Mil.) ball filled with combustibles; f.-balloon, made buoyant by heat of combustible burning at its mouth; f.-bird, kind of bee-eater; f.-blast, disease of plants; f.-blight, disease of hops; f.-box, fuel-chamber of steam-boiler; f.-brand, piece of burning wood, person or thing kindling strife; f.-brick, proof against f., used in grates &c.; f.-brigade, organized body of firemen; f.-cross, =fiery cross; f.-damp, miner\'s name for carburetted hydrogen, explosive when mixed in certain proportion with air; f.-dog, andiron; f.-eater, juggler who eats fire, great fighter, duellist; f.-engine, machine for throwing water to extinguish ff.; f.-escape, apparatus for saving people in burning house; f.-eyed (poet.), with glowing eyes; f.-flair, a fish, the sting-ray; f.-fly, winged insect emitting phosphorescent light; f.-guard. wire frame or grating to keep children, coals, from falling into f., room; f.-hose, hose-pipe for extinguishing ff.; f.-insurance, against losses by f.; f.-irons, tongs, poker, & shovel; f.-light, light from f.-place; f.-lighter, prepared kindlingfuel; firelock, antiquated musket in which priming was ignited by sparks; fireman, tender of furnace or steam-engine f., man employed to extinguish ff.; f.-new (archaic), =brand-new; f. office, insuring against f.; f.-pan, brazier; f.-place, grate or hearth for room-f.; f.-plug (abbr. F.P.), connexion in water-main for f.-hose; f.-policy, f.-insurance office\'s certificate guaranteeing compensation in case of f.; f.-raising, arson; f.-screen, to keep off heat of f.; f.-ship, freighted with combustibles and sent adrift to ignite enemy\'s ships &c.; fireside, space round f.-place, home life; f.-stone, kind that resists f., used for furnaces &c.; f.-teazer, stoker; f.-trap, building without proper exits in case of f.; f.-water, ardent spirits; firewood, wood prepared for fuel; firework, kinds of apparatus giving spectacular effects by use of combustibles &c., squib, rocket, &c.; f.-worship, treatment of f. as a deity. Hence fireproof, fireless, aa. [West German] Concise Oxford Dictionary
  72. Set f. to with intention of destroying; kindle (explosives); (of explosives, mines) catch f.; become heated or excited (f. up, show sudden anger); redden (t. & i.); bake (pottery, bricks), cure (tea, tobacco) by artificial heat; (Farriery) cauterize; supply (furnace, engine) with fuel; cause (explosive, gun) to explode (often off; f. salute, discharge number of guns as salute; f. broadside, discharge all guns on one side of ship), (abs.) shoot, discharge gun &c., (fig.) f. away, begin, go ahead; (of gun &c.) go off; propel (missile) from gun &c. (fig. f. off a postcard, a remark); (United States) f. out or f., expel, dismiss, reject, (person). Concise Oxford Dictionary
  73. n. [Anglo-Saxon, German, Greek] The evolution of light and heat in the combustion of bodies; combustion; state of ignition;—fuel in a state of combustion, as on a hearth or in a furnace; the burning of a house or town; a conflagration;—the discharge of fire-arms;—lustre; splendour;—torture by burning;—the future state of the impenitent;—ardour; violence, as of zeal or love;—intellectual force; liveliness of imagination; vigour of fancy; energy of thought or diction; animation in delivery;—rage; contention;—trouble; affliction. Cabinet Dictionary
  74. The element that burns; anything burning; a conflagration of towns or countries the punishment of the damned; anything that inflames the passions; ardour of temper; liveliness of imagination, vigour of fancy, spirit of sentiment; the passion of love; eruptions or imposthumations, as St. Anthony’s fire. Complete Dictionary

What are the misspellings for fire?

X